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You will have to go back each time, as long as the numbers are written down its easy, I think the Land Cruiser is the only Toyota that can store 2 sets of numbers
Bummer.... :headbang: Another way to get more $$ from you. I know my Tundra didn't like it and I kept getting the light, but it would go off after awhile if I was running my other wheels and tires during the summer.

I'm told the newer systems, like on the HH, it will cause a problem if they are not there.
 

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Check out this thread in the 08+ Highlander forum, which may answer your questions. Hope it can help some.....

Thanks, that was a help.

I guess the one question I still have would be can you just run regular valve stems for the winter tire and wheel combination and not have it cause a problem with the vehicles ECM system. I know on the Tundra I had (early ECM), where I had summer tires and TRD wheels with no sensors I was OK unless I was on a longer trip and then the light would come on for the tire system. But if that's the only thing one would have to live with for a time during the winter VS paying $320 for additional sensors on the winter tire wheels and/or going to the dealer at $80 a pop, or buying the tool shown for $150 that would be worth it to me.
 

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Thanks, that was a help.

I guess the one question I still have would be can you just run regular valve stems for the winter tire and wheel combination and not have it cause a problem with the vehicles ECM system. I know on the Tundra I had (early ECM), where I had summer tires and TRD wheels with no sensors I was OK unless I was on a longer trip and then the light would come on for the tire system. But if that's the only thing one would have to live with for a time during the winter VS paying $320 for additional sensors on the winter tire wheels and/or going to the dealer at $80 a pop, or buying the tool shown for $150 that would be worth it to me.
Probably the best/fastest way to answer that question would be to bump the thread I linked in the 08+ Highlander forum and ask that question. One of those guys should be able to provide you with an answer most ricky tick. Glad to be able to lend a hand....:thumbsup:
 

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2006 HH tire pressure sensor?

Hi,
Would anyone advice if the 2006 HH has or not tire pressure sensors?
I could not find anything in the manual about them, and no gage light appear to be about tire pressure sensors.

If it has tire pressure sensors, is it OK to use snow tires on rims WITHOUT tire pressure sensors during the winter season?

Thanks.
 

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:welcome: to Toyota Nation!

Yes, your 2006 has TPMS sensors. Read this very recent thread which will answer some of your questions, but also search this forum and the 08+ Highlander forum for "TPMS" and you'll come up with several informative threads.
 

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Your 1st generation Highlander should have an indirect tire sensors which only detect rotational differences among the tires using the same sensors for the antilock brakes, there is no direct tire pressure sensor. Only 2nd generation Highlanders(2008+) have the direct pressure sensors which also monitor the spare. Your owners manual should have something on the tire sensor system and how to reset it, my non-hybrid owners manual does.
 

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Bad Gas Mileage & Tire PSI (tire or car sticker?)

:confused:Recently bought a toyota certified 08 Highlander Hybrid (14K miles). I have only been getting around 16 or 17 mpg! I leave it on ECON mode and I drive city only, stop and go. I drive slowly and try to get the EV mode going whenever I can. What am I doing wrong? Or is this typical?

Another question - My PSI on the sticker on the door say max. 32 for the tires. The TOYO tires (I assume are manuf. bought given the low mileage) say max 43. I currently have my tires at 34 psi. Do you go with the what the car sticker says or what is actually on the tire? I have no heavy loads (only 3 small kids occasionally).

I am starting to think that it was a mistake to sell my Sienna minivan (which gets 17 mpg city) because it got the same gas mileage (however, definitely not as cool to drive). Oh well, so much for saving the environment! LOL

Hopefully you all can help me out - this forum seems to have by far the best advice:clap:
 

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:welcome: to Toyota Nation!

I'm not a hybrid owner myself so I'll leave the mileage issue to other members, but IMO 34 PSI is just fine. You'll get widely ranging opinions about tire pressure, but personally I think manufacturers typically set the pressure too low. I have always kept my vehicles at 34-35 PSI, and have never in 30 years of driving had a set wear unevenly. I keep my Highlander's tires at 35.

I will say this about your mileage as it's unusually low. I've got a V6 Base model and I consistently get 18/19 in the city and 27/28 highway, just for comparison.
 

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Hi have an 08 HH (6K Miles) and in town, this time of year, I average 26-27 MPG and that's with some mixed driving thrown in (Highway 70 MPH). The lowest I ever got with either my 06 or this HH was 19 MPG and that was in the dead of winter and sub zero temps. So I would say you are not getting what you should either as a result of your driving style or a programming issue with the vehicle.

Do you have a lot of hills? Hills really kill the mileage. Also, try not driving in the ECON mode and feather the gas pedal a little more, I found it allows you to be out of the gas more and get to EV mode quicker and my mileage went up when I did this, but this could be as a result of where I drive. As for the tire pressure, I run mine at 36 currently and am thinking of bumping it to 38 as some have reported better tire wear on the Toyo tires there.

I would certainly go back to the dealer and have them check it out as that is not close to what you should be getting.
 

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I have an 06 HiHy and we get around 26mpg in mixed, mostly freeway driving. so your 17mpg in stop and go is concerning. mpg will vary widely based on driving style, and driving conditions. ECON mode moderates throttle response to try and keep the ICE off as much as possible, whereas EV mode is strictly electric. mind you, only the newer hybirds come with these modes as my 06 does not, but these things i have learned by driving the newer hybrids and speaking with the largely not very informative folks at Toyota.

as i've said, driving style is one of the most important determinants of resultant mpg, and therefore your goal while driving the vehicle should be to drive it gently. i learned to adjust my driving style by observing the power flow display, basically the less time the ICE is on, the better your mpg. this, combined with coasting to stoplights to maximize the regenerative braking as well as feathering/pulsing the throttle will maximize the potential of the hybrid. and for the best advice on how to maximize fuel economy, just do a yahoo search on "prius driving tips" and do some reading, as the prius folks have been doing this for longer than we have and they know how to hypermile...

a word on tire pressure, you can inflate your tires beyond the manufacturers specs as these specs are geared more toward comfort and ride compliance and less toward fuel economy. just make sure that you never exceed the MAX PRESS printed on the tire sidewall. also realize that air expands as it gets hot and tire pressure will elevate further with distance driving, usually about 3-4 psi for long distance nonstop trips. with all this said, the max press printed on my tires are 44psi, and i run my tires between 38-40psi cold.

lastly, there is a chance there is something mechanically wrong with the vehicle, but i do not think this is likely. so try some of these tips and if your mpg still sucks, have the stealer look at it.
 

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Do you have a lot of hills? Hills really kill the mileage. Also, try not driving in the ECON mode and feather the gas pedal a little more, I found it allows you to be out of the gas more and get to EV mode quicker and my mileage went up when I did this, but this could be as a result of where I drive. As for the tire pressure, I run mine at 36 currently and am thinking of bumping it to 38 as some have reported better tire wear on the Toyo tires there.
I totally agree with that. People who tend to rely on the ECON mode or, even regular HL owners who engage the "Snow button" in an effort to improve mileage consistently report poorer mileage. Being lighter, smarter on the gas while driving will give you the biggest mileage improvement. Just an opinion.
 

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I've compared the ECON and the 'snail mode' driving back to back, and have consistently done better with ECON mode. Not only does it dull throttle response, but it also changes the metrics for the way the climate control works and changes the response of the hybrid system and transmission. It is there for a reason.

I do agree on the 'snow mode' issue for non-hybrids though--a waste of time and potentially hazardous to your tranny for long term use.

I get ~29 at present with my 09 hybrid. I'd take yours into the dealer.
 

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the only way to correlate the display to the physical tires is to do the following:

using 2 people, one to observe and report tpms data and the other to physically adjust each tires pressure:

display the tpms data on the mfd, noting each lines tire pressure.

starting with the left front tire and moving clockwise,

1) denote maximum tire pressure for specific tire as displayed on tire wall.
2) add or remove tire pressure while observing tpms data. you are looking for the tpms line that indicates a change in tire pressure. if you increase pressure, look for a positive change. if you decrease pressure, look for a negative change. it might take a minute or two for the tire sensor to report a change in pressure. be sure not to exceed maximum tire pressure. if more than one line reports a change in pressure, wait a few minutes and repeat step 2 until only 1 line changes.
3) record line number of tpms display and tire position(lf,rf,rr,spare,lr). the tpms line that indicates the change in tire pressure is now correlated with that physical tire.

continue steps 1-3 above until all 5 tires uniquely correlate to an individual line in the tpms display.

save correlation data

reset all tires to your desired pressure one at a time using above steps to verify correlation data.

remember: this correlation will change any time a tire is physically moved to another tire location. i.e., tire rotation.
 

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when the toyota service technician did the above procedure on my 09 hihy, he told me to have the procedure repeated after the tires are rotated. I assume the sensors are in the tire or attached to the tire stem. i did not see anything on the rim.
 

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when the toyota service technician did the above procedure on my 09 hihy, he told me to have the procedure repeated after the tires are rotated. I assume the sensors are in the tire or attached to the tire stem. i did not see anything on the rim.
TPMS is usually associated with the stem, but when tires are rotated they are not remounted...the entire tire and rim are moved (doh), thus the original correlation will work. you just need to know where they were moved..LOL
 

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they are still correlated, but the labeling or name of the tires location will change. i.e., if line #1 is rf and that tire is moved to rr, then line #1 becomes rr(duh)! lol
 
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