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2000 Toyota Camry LE
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Hi All, I have an 01 Camry with the 5S-FE 4-cyl engine and I need to replace the coolant. I have a friend who owns a repair shop and he lets me use the lifts once in a while. Since I don't have access to the pumps and other gear to flush out the cooling system (plus I am not a fan of flushing especially on a car with the mileage that mine has) I am going to put my car on a lift and open the radiator drain valve and drain the radiator and whatever else might come out from the engine and block. I am using the green anti-freeze because that is what the man I bought the car from used. I am trying to find out how much the radiator holds so I make sure I have enough anti-freeze with me to adequately fill the radiator. I am thinking I will do a drain and fill next weekend and then another in 2 to 3 weeks and have about 90% new anti-freeze in the car. I used this method which I learned about on this forum with my power steering system and it worked great. Thanks all.
 

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1995 Camry LE Wagon
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You don't need a lift, drain cock is easily accessible from above, under the hood, DS - at least on my year.

One gallon per rad flush, or a little bit more.

Walmart 5 year green is just fine. Use premix or undiluted and distilled water.
 

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イリジウム
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Yeah I think it was a little less than a gallon if you just do a simple drain/refill. So get 2 gallons of Zerex Asian from Walmart at about $13-14/gallon, and return one if you don't use it.

If you open the block drains and change the coolant in the reservoir then you'll use the 2nd jug.

Hey what's with the pictures Stillrunning? :wink::wink::wink:

https://www.toyotanation.com/forum/103-camry-3rd-4th-gen-1992-1996-1997-2001-1st-gen-solara-1999-2003/1375489-coolant-flush-method.html

https://www.toyotanation.com/forum/103-camry-3rd-4th-gen-1992-1996-1997-2001-1st-gen-solara-1999-2003/391224-diy-coolant-flush-change-4-cylinder-gen-4-a.html
 

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2001 Camry
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I have the same car you do. I posted this procedure somewhere before (post #35 of the linked thread):

https://www.toyotanation.com/forum/104-camry-5th-6th-gen-2002-2006-2007-2011-2nd-gen-solara-2004-2008/1652414-incompatible-antifreeze-coolant-mixed-3.html

Sorry for the late response. I did a radiator flush for my first time last May on my 2001 Camry. As I am also new to DIY... I tried to find the most simple, straightforward process to do the flush. I drove the car onto ramps and took the splash shield off from underneath. I noticed afterwards that you could probably get away with not removing the splash shield. There is a hole in the splash shield that the coolant can drain through (the hole is right underneath the radiator drain valve). You could probably stick a piece of plastic tubing into the drain valve and have it drain into your bucket directly. If you do choose to remove the splash shield, make sure to use WD-40 on the splash shield bolts. I was stupid and didn't, and ended up breaking a few bolts from rust.

After draining the radiator, I think slightly less than a gallon came out. I filled up the radiator with distilled water (about one gallon, so it was like $1.50 at Walmart... I don't think it's worth saving a few bucks to use tap water rather than distilled water). I then let the engine run for a few minutes to operating temperature so the thermostat would open and the car would get to operating temperature. Then I did the same process again twice more (so a total of 3 drains and filling with distilled water). After 3 drains/fills with distilled water, the system is mostly just water. For example, assume the system was 50% coolant and 50% water to begin with, and about half the system is drained with each drain. After the first exchange, you will have 25% coolant. Second, 12.5% coolant. Third, 6.25%. So your system will be 6.25% coolant and 93.75% water. Good enough in my book.

The cooling system total capacity is slightly less than 2 gallons. So, I drained the radiator for a fourth time, and filled it with concentrated (non-diluted) coolant. This would give me an approximate 50% coolant and 50% water ratio.

The recommended coolant for your car (Toyota Pink, or an equivalent like Pentofrost A4) comes diluted. My coolant flush process would only work for non-diluted coolant. I forget if you can use the Toyota Red concentrate (equivalent to Pentofrost A1). I *think* that the Toyota Red is forward-compatible (meaning you can use the Toyota Red in your car) but the Toyota Pink is NOT reverse-compatible (so I couldn't use the Toyota Pink in my 2001). If this is the case (and please do double check), then you can use Toyota Red/Pentofrost A1 concentrated 100% coolant after flushing with water for a proper 50/50 mixture.

Toyota Red only has a 5 year lifespan compared to Toyota Pink's 10 year lifespan. So, if you choose to use this process with Toyota Red, then just remember to do a simple drain and fill 4-5 years down the road and use Toyota Pink then.


I also used the green coolant. Looking back, I should have used the proper red one, but I don't think it's a big deal and I'm not going to do the whole process again. You should be fine with the green coolant. Our cars (2001) should NOT use Toyota Pink, it will corrode the heater core or something of that nature. Red is the proper coolant.
 

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I'll give my opinion on coolant.

Prestone green (light green/lime)....my friends use it in their toyota because it's cheap etc. They never had per say a coolant issue in their cars. It'll work but I have been finding it will cause corrosion (especially on the neck of the metal upper radiator and lower radiator hoses on the engine) long term. I've seen pictures of incorrect coolant (prestone green) in aluminum engines where there is moderate pitting that occurs. When I did some upper top end work on my friends 1995 Camry V6, the engine looked OK, but the lower intake pendium gasket had a bit of white corrosion along with the radiator neck. My bought 1998 V6 had similar as well w/ green coolant. My 2004 XLE V6 with pink had no corrosion what-so-ever along with my 2006 IS250 when I did some coolant system work.

Personally for me I would use Toyota red or pink depending on application. It's not much more for me here between red or pink.
 

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08 Toyota Camry 2AZ-FE R9K Tuned
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I've seen many, many cars at the salvage yard with destroyed cooling systems due to the generic Preston crap.
But were they destroyed or were they dismantled? :whatthe: Though honestly when I still worked in the shop I don't know what coolant we used other than it was just a giant drum of green coolant concentrate that we filled a coolant jug with and diluted with water. It might've been from Corey Oil along with our semi-synthetic oil.

To me at least, unless you are the first or second owner or know the service history you should use OEM coolant or compatible fluid. If you are the third or forth or just one of many owners, who knows what is in it and if it ain't red anymore might just be better off with green coolant. Though I am probably just being a hypocrite with this.
 

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To me at least, unless you are the first or second owner or know the service history you should use OEM coolant or compatible fluid. If you are the third or forth or just one of many owners, who knows what is in it and if it ain't red anymore might just be better off with green coolant. Though I am probably just being a hypocrite with this.
When I got my 2004 SE I4, the coolant color was brown. They had a big chain shop do a 'coolant exchange' and filled it with some generic green in one of the many repair work I inhered for the car. The 2004 had pink. I'm betting they never did a proper 'exchange'.

I drain/refilled many times to get it somewhat back to pink. Figure do it every year or two and it'll eventually get okay.
 

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Hmmm.... now you guys are making me wonder if I should do another flush and fill with red coolant. My radiator is about 5 years old so I'm sure it'll last a bit longer regardless of what coolant I use. But my radiator hoses are original, and I wouldn't want to wear them out with the green coolant.

Perhaps the rate of corrosion will be slowed down if I changed the green coolant on a more frequent schedule (say, every 2 years)?
 

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1995 Camry LE Wagon
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But my radiator hoses are original, and I wouldn't want to wear them out with the green coolant.
Coolant can affect metal not hoses.

Perhaps the rate of corrosion will be slowed down if I changed the green coolant on a more frequent schedule (say, every 2 years)?
I use the Walmart green 5 year and change rad coolant every 2 years - works well.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Doesn't the Prestone green have silicates, and doesn't that turn into silt in the cooling system which eventually plugs it up?
There was a thread on this just last week, where the Toyota trained techs who post here did a much better job than I, explaining the chemistry of it.

That's why we are supposed to only use the red Asian coolant which is correctly formulated to avoid that, and it costs no more when bought at Walmart.


Of course, it takes time for that damage to accumulate, making it easy for some folks to believe that green is just fine. I recently bought a very well cared for '92, with 190k miles, which had been using green. Every part of the cooling system had a fine layer of silt in it when I took it apart. Unclear just how much had accumulated, or how many years the green had been used, but the silt was there.


Norm
 

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^this.

Been a bit confusing for me personally and I want to get to the bottom of this, but empirically what I see on Toyotas that have been run on silicate coolants is the aforementioned pitting (you usually notice it when you take off any hoses or the tstat housing, and silt. I finished a 2UZ timing belt and a 5S last week, both had been running green coolant. The 5S was regular changes every year according to the owner, and the 2UZ was unknown (guy just bought it and it was 10K overdue for tbelt). Both had pitting and dumped the silt/sandy stuff into my drain pan. I refilled them both with Zerex Asian Red. The 2UZ WP had been leaking out the weep hole and had minor play in the shaft; not sure if that was accelerated by coolant choice, but the rubber-embossed metal gasket was shredded and there was severe pitting on the block surface where the WP goes.
 

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Walmart SuperTech Anti-freeze:

CONTAINS GLYCOL (107-21-1), DIETHYLENE GLYCOL (111-46-6), SODIUM 2-ETHYL HEXANOATE (19766-89-3), AND SODIUM NEODECANOATE (31548-27-3).

"Formulated to mix with any anti-freeze in any make or model engine."

Where are the silicates?
 

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short-throw dipstick
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^maybe not in that but I could swear I've seen green with silicates at other parts stores (universal yellow almost always does). The 2-EHA would have a detrimental effect on the head gaskets and composite/nylon gaskets such as most intake manifold gaskets on our cars.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Yeah, I was thinking the same thing! I wonder if the reputation of 3VZ engines to eat head gaskets at 200k intervals was caused by people using the incorrect green/yellow antifreeze?

Mine went to 200k and I always used Toyota red. Rebuilding it now, curious what the head gasket will look like when I get to that point.


It is interesting how people will use something, and just because it doesn't blow up immediately they assume it is fine and the manufacturer's warning was silly.
Norm
 
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