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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
Situation: A month and a half ago I purchased a 2017 Toyota Camry LE from a dealership in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Mileage was 25k kms, no accidents nor recalls. It was in pristine condition. Since then I have only driven approximately1000kms. 350 kms involved my drive home from where I purchased it, and the balance due to the pandemic.
Note: It is not within the 3 year 60 kms warranty period.

Problem
About a week ago I noticed a slight crack on the left lower area of my media display. It has since started to expand. Photo attached. I contacted two dealers. The one I purchased it from claims it is a 'cosmetic' problem and therefore would not be considered under warranty. I took it in to my local Toyota dealer and they said it wouldn't be something they warranty, but I should contact the sales manager where I purchased it to negotiate some sort of deal, as it will cost in the range of $1200+ and tax to replace. This is not an option.

I urgently need advice about how top proceed to have this replaced at the cost of the dealer or Toyota corp.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Dealer or Toyota will not replace that or foot the bill, especially on a 4 years old car. Your best bet would be to replace it with something aftermarket from Kenwood, Sony, Alpine, etc. You will get a better-sounding system with way more features, even NAV if you like.

Check out Crutchfield for options.
 

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Captain Camry
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Three options. 1) replace the screen (digitizer) only, around $20. 2) replace the whole unit with a factory one (around $150 shipped) I literally just threw my old one in the garbage today because no one would buy it at $100. 3) buy an aftermarket stereo, around $500 with all the necessary parts to integrate steering wheel controls, backup camera, etc. This will GREATLY improve the audio quality and add a lot of new features.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dealer or Toyota will not replace that or foot the bill, especially on a 4 years old car. Your best bet would be to replace it with something aftermarket from Kenwood, Sony, Alpine, etc. You will get a better-sounding system with way more features, even NAV if you like.

Check out Crutchfield for options.
Thank you for your reply.

I understand your point. The car was sold as a Toyota Certified vehicle meaning it is essentially considered 'new.' Considering the exceptionally low mileage since the purchase and on the vehicle it was my hope that these facts would persuade the dealerships to at the very least provide some form of negotiated agreement. Unfortunately not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Three options. 1) replace the screen (digitizer) only, around $20. 2) replace the whole unit with a factory one (around $150 shipped) I literally just threw my old one in the garbage today because no one would buy it at $100. 3) buy an aftermarket stereo, around $500 with all the necessary parts to integrate steering wheel controls, backup camera, etc. This will GREATLY improve the audio quality and add a lot of new features.
Thanks for your feedback. I hear what you're saying. I will look into replacing the screen digitizer first. I this works great. If not, for the time being I am going to affix a clear screen saver (from an old tablet that died) that worked to prevent a crack in a phone screen from expanding after it had started. I have made it work for a similar situation in the past and it will allow me some time before I had to replace.
 

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Camry Freak
Camry & Accord
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2,160 Posts
Hello,
Situation: A month and a half ago I purchased a 2017 Toyota Camry LE from a dealership in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Mileage was 25k kms, no accidents nor recalls. It was in pristine condition. Since then I have only driven approximately1000kms. 350 kms involved my drive home from where I purchased it, and the balance due to the pandemic.
Note: It is not within the 3 year 60 kms warranty period.

Problem
About a week ago I noticed a slight crack on the left lower area of my media display. It has since started to expand. Photo attached. I contacted two dealers. The one I purchased it from claims it is a 'cosmetic' problem and therefore would not be considered under warranty. I took it in to my local Toyota dealer and they said it wouldn't be something they warranty, but I should contact the sales manager where I purchased it to negotiate some sort of deal, as it will cost in the range of $1200+ and tax to replace. This is not an option.

I urgently need advice about how top proceed to have this replaced at the cost of the dealer or Toyota corp.

Thanks in advance.
Thank you for your reply.

I understand your point. The car was sold as a Toyota Certified vehicle meaning it is essentially considered 'new.' Considering the exceptionally low mileage since the purchase and on the vehicle it was my hope that these facts would persuade the dealerships to at the very least provide some form of negotiated agreement. Unfortunately not.
First- I'm sorry that you are dealing with this. It's an unfortunate situation given the low miles on the odometer and the fact that the factory bumper-to-bumper warranty has expired. Are you sure that there wasn't evidence of damage when you bought the car? Maybe a small crack or imperfection? I can't help but wonder if the selling dealer did something to try and cover up the damage in order to sell the car. I have no idea how they would do that to cover up a crack like that- but I wouldn't put it past a dealer to try.

Your best bet (in my opinion) is to go with an aftermarket option. Toyota's infotainment systems aren't the best- and are often a generation or two behind the competition. Your 2017 infotainment system is no exception. Although an aftermarket system won't "look" factory- you'll probably get a better system that has better features and usability for a reasonable price.

Looking at the Toyota Certified Warranty information, it looks like you do get a 12 month, 12,000 mile warranty. The problem I see is that you have to convince Toyota that this part somehow developed this crack between the date of purchase and now because of a defect in the materials or workmanship of the vehicle. That's going to be a tough thing to try and do. If the crack began before you purchased the car- the warranty booklet indicates that it's not a covered repair. If Toyota believes that you did something to cause the crack- then it's not a covered repair.

Ultimately- Toyota needs to be convinced that somehow- for some reason- a crack spontaneously formed and spread on a car that didn't have an issue for the first four years of ownership. That's where your problem lies. The likeliness that this suddenly happened due to a defect in workmanship or materials on a four year-old car is going to be a very hard thing to prove. In addition- glass is one of the specific things that's not covered under the certified warranty. There have been a few posts about cracks in infotainment screens (I think most of them were for the 2018+ Camry)... but it seems like it was something that impacted relatively new cars and likely occurred due to things expanding and contracting as the temperature changed. On a four year-old car- it seems like if a stress-related crack due to temperature changes were to happen- it would have happened long ago- probably during the first twelve years of the car's life.

You can certainly call Toyota and ask them to investigate your case- but I wouldn't hold your breath about getting them to repair the issue under the certified warranty.

In general- those certified warranties often seem rather pointless. They can add a not-so-small amount to the transaction price (certified cars often are more expensive)... yet if you read the fine print- there's lots of little details that can often result in things not being covered under warranty that surprise people... especially for problems on the inside of the car. Often the powertrain components are cut and dry for what's covered and what's not- but the interior coverage is often very vague and not specific- which leads to lots of things not actually being covered when problems arise. A crack in the infotainment screen is one of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
First- I'm sorry that you are dealing with this. It's an unfortunate situation given the low miles on the odometer and the fact that the factory bumper-to-bumper warranty has expired. Are you sure that there wasn't evidence of damage when you bought the car? Maybe a small crack or imperfection? I can't help but wonder if the selling dealer did something to try and cover up the damage in order to sell the car. I have no idea how they would do that to cover up a crack like that- but I wouldn't put it past a dealer to try.

Your best bet (in my opinion) is to go with an aftermarket option. Toyota's infotainment systems aren't the best- and are often a generation or two behind the competition. Your 2017 infotainment system is no exception. Although an aftermarket system won't "look" factory- you'll probably get a better system that has better features and usability for a reasonable price.

Looking at the Toyota Certified Warranty information, it looks like you do get a 12 month, 12,000 mile warranty. The problem I see is that you have to convince Toyota that this part somehow developed this crack between the date of purchase and now because of a defect in the materials or workmanship of the vehicle. That's going to be a tough thing to try and do. If the crack began before you purchased the car- the warranty booklet indicates that it's not a covered repair. If Toyota believes that you did something to cause the crack- then it's not a covered repair.

Ultimately- Toyota needs to be convinced that somehow- for some reason- a crack spontaneously formed and spread on a car that didn't have an issue for the first four years of ownership. That's where your problem lies. The likeliness that this suddenly happened due to a defect in workmanship or materials on a four year-old car is going to be a very hard thing to prove. In addition- glass is one of the specific things that's not covered under the certified warranty. There have been a few posts about cracks in infotainment screens (I think most of them were for the 2018+ Camry)... but it seems like it was something that impacted relatively new cars and likely occurred due to things expanding and contracting as the temperature changed. On a four year-old car- it seems like if a stress-related crack due to temperature changes were to happen- it would have happened long ago- probably during the first twelve years of the car's life.

You can certainly call Toyota and ask them to investigate your case- but I wouldn't hold your breath about getting them to repair the issue under the certified warranty.

In general- those certified warranties often seem rather pointless. They can add a not-so-small amount to the transaction price (certified cars often are more expensive)... yet if you read the fine print- there's lots of little details that can often result in things not being covered under warranty that surprise people... especially for problems on the inside of the car. Often the powertrain components are cut and dry for what's covered and what's not- but the interior coverage is often very vague and not specific- which leads to lots of things not actually being covered when problems arise. A crack in the infotainment screen is one of them.
Thanks, you described the situation exceptionally well. I have been quickly coming to the same conclusion about the reality of having the crack covered by Toyota. It's not going to happen, and may not be worth it based on the quality of said system and the fairly minor cost to purchase a better quality unit.
FYI I fortunately was able to purchase at a very competitive price, and when all is reconciled I will be ahead. However, it is an unwelcome expense.

Cheers,

Scott
 

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Even though they won't cover the repair now, make sure it is documented. The radio is functioning now but you don't know how that crack will affect the radio if it keeps growing. In the meantime, I would try not to focus on the crack (yeah, i know, easier said than done) and save money to replace the radio down the road. Good luck.
 

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Camry Freak
Camry & Accord
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Thanks, you described the situation exceptionally well. I have been quickly coming to the same conclusion about the reality of having the crack covered by Toyota. It's not going to happen, and may not be worth it based on the quality of said system and the fairly minor cost to purchase a better quality unit.
FYI I fortunately was able to purchase at a very competitive price, and when all is reconciled I will be ahead. However, it is an unwelcome expense.

Cheers,

Scott
No problem.

I generally love Toyotas- but their infotainment systems are absolutely horrible- and have been for about the last ten years. When I purchased my 2007 Camry- I thought that the system was pretty competitive for the the time- but that was before the move to touchscreens and larger color screens. My 2007 Camry has the JBL 6-Disc in-dash changer. It's easy to use, has a large, easy-to-read display- and the controls are simple and intuitive.

Compare that to the mess that is the infotainment system in the 2021 Camry- or even the 7th Gen Camry's system. When I was shopping for a midsize sedan last year- I drove a Camry and was horrified at just how bad the infotainment system was for a 2021 car. It's really a shame- because Toyota does so many other things so well.

Both Toyota and Lexus need to completely redesign their infotainment systems and the way that you interact with them. The combination of the cost of a V6 Camry along with the lousy infotainment system was the largest reason why I went with an Accord over a Camry last year. Honda's current infotainment systems are really nice to use. Despite the fact that the Accord's system is now almost four years old- it still feels modern and is competitive in the segment. Maybe a little small (8"), but still really good.

As cars get more and more electronically advanced and more stuff is incorporated into the infotainment system- it becomes increasingly important for Toyota to rethink their user interface.
 

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No problem.

I generally love Toyotas- but their infotainment systems are absolutely horrible- and have been for about the last ten years. When I purchased my 2007 Camry- I thought that the system was pretty competitive for the the time- but that was before the move to touchscreens and larger color screens. My 2007 Camry has the JBL 6-Disc in-dash changer. It's easy to use, has a large, easy-to-read display- and the controls are simple and intuitive.

Compare that to the mess that is the infotainment system in the 2021 Camry- or even the 7th Gen Camry's system. When I was shopping for a midsize sedan last year- I drove a Camry and was horrified at just how bad the infotainment system was for a 2021 car. It's really a shame- because Toyota does so many other things so well.

Both Toyota and Lexus need to completely redesign their infotainment systems and the way that you interact with them. The combination of the cost of a V6 Camry along with the lousy infotainment system was the largest reason why I went with an Accord over a Camry last year. Honda's current infotainment systems are really nice to use. Despite the fact that the Accord's system is now almost four years old- it still feels modern and is competitive in the segment. Maybe a little small (8"), but still really good.

As cars get more and more electronically advanced and more stuff is incorporated into the infotainment system- it becomes increasingly important for Toyota to rethink their user interface.
Toyota hurt themselves by not adapting to Android and Apple sooner. They were one of the last manufacturers to include Android Auto and Apple CarPlay in their infotainment design; relying on in-house design. In this ultra competitive car market, thankfully Toyota is the standard for reliability (given the number of cars they sell) or this could have damaged their car sales. It will be interesting to see the improvements in the next iteration of the Camry, Rav4, ES350, etc.
 
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