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Discussion Starter #1
There have been reports from a structural engineer that the Queen Mary in Long Beach, California may soon become unsalvageable if nothing is done to address issues listed due to years of neglect.
 

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The stupid dickheads who own the Queen Mary would have solved a huge number of preservation problems if they had preserved the ship high and dry instead of keeping it in salt water. The initial expense of otherwise drydocking the ship would have paid for themselves decades ago, at least regarding hull maintenance but also directly attributable interior maintenance. IMHO
 

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Dickheads usually think only in now expense, not in future profit. My company has eyes way bigger than stomach but believes, that business will develop itself with negative investments into it.
I've worked for a few of those companies over the years. Last company would rub 2 nickles together to equal a quarter. That's how cheap they were.
 

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Yeah, yours rubbed something. Mine want you to add YOUR money to their business and then they take 80% of profit plus charge you for everything else they do.
But, what I am saying, modern business mindset is simple - if it costs anything, we do not do it.
Unless you are on non exhaustible money IV like Elon Musk. Bloody Elite special project to distract crowd from reality.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You just keep saying what a lot of us are thinking. I mean the state is broke, so where would it get to the money to fix it. Besides, it's a tourist trap.
The Queen Mary is the iconic symbol of Long Beach in the same way the Empire State Building is for New York, Eiffel Tower is for Paris, and the London Eye is for London.
 

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The Queen Mary is the iconic symbol of Long Beach in the same way the Empire State Building is for New York, Eiffel Tower is for Paris, and the London Eye is for London.
They sure don't do much to advertise it, though, at least not in the regional market out west.
 

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Token Aussie
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The Queen Mary is the iconic symbol of Long Beach in the same way the Empire State Building is for New York, Eiffel Tower is for Paris, and the London Eye is for London.
I would argue that the Queen Mary is nowhere near as iconic as the other places you mentioned (Long Beach itself probably doesn't mean anything to international tourists to begin with), sure it's an iconic ship but not as an attraction
 

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Camry Freak
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In this case it seems like the community in Long Beach needs to make a decision...

1) Either raise taxes or impose fees to help pay for the repairs AND provide a steady stream of money to pay for future ongoing maintenance. This doesn't have to be in the form of an income tax, property tax, or something similar- but maybe create a special tax district where businesses in the vicinity pay a bit more in taxes to help cover the repairs- with the hope that the improvement in the ship might generate additional customers who visit the area- driving up business to a point where the increase in revenue for those local businesses outpace the potential taxes. You could also propose a special sales tax just for the business district surrounding the ship. You'd need to have a study to see how different scenarios would work out the potential tax increases in comparison to likely revenue increases. My city created a special tax district around a new arena to help offset the cost that the city paid to help build the arena. Many people bitched about the new taxes- but after two years they are raking in the profits from the steady stream of people who frequent that arena- and often stop to shop and eat before/after the events at the arena. If they chose this option, they should figure out how to attract more people to the ship- because it's pretty clear that the current operational plan isn't bringing in enough people to pay for the costs of upkeep.
2) Seek private donors to help fund the repairs and the ongoing maintenance costs once it is repaired. Reach out to Cunard and Disney to start, and maybe some of the large cruise companies to see if they'd be willing to sponsor the ship in exchange for publicity/advertising. Cunard might have given up the ship decades ago- but they might have an interest in ensuring that the ship stays afloat and in business.
3) Sell it to the scrap yard. Yes, it's a piece of history and people in Long Beach want to keep it, but unless they are willing to pay for it, it's not feasible to keep it afloat. As a person who loves history, this isn't the most preferred option. There are very few of these ships left- but in the end, if it costs too much to keep afloat, it may have to join the many other ships from this era and head to the scrap yard.
 

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I would argue that the Queen Mary is nowhere near as iconic as the other places you mentioned (Long Beach itself probably doesn't mean anything to international tourists to begin with), sure it's an iconic ship but not as an attraction
I don't know what the QM's owner's options were at the time of purchase, but they'd have done themselves a favor by originally finding a better berthing location. Long Beach is not the garden spot of the L.A. basin, and that's being kind. They'd have been much better off locating it in San Francisco or San Diego. It would have been like locating the original Disneyland in Buffalo, New York. I'll wager the eagerness of tourists to visit that city would have been much less over the decades than California and Florida. I'm just saying....
 

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I don't know what the QM's owner's options were at the time of purchase, but they'd have done themselves a favor by originally finding a better berthing location. Long Beach is not the garden spot of the L.A. basin, and that's being kind. They'd have been much better off locating it in San Francisco or San Diego. It would have been like locating the original Disneyland in Buffalo, New York. I'll wager the eagerness of tourists to visit that city would have been much less over the decades than California and Florida. I'm just saying....
I visited Long Beach in the late 80's when a friend moved out there. Saw the Queen Mary from a distance but had no real desire to take a tour. Much of that was due to being to get on the Naval base a couple times. The second visit including getting on a dependent's day cruise on the USS Missouri. That obviously topped everything else.
 

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I've visited the Missouri, and it was a great tour. That was about five years ago, and I'll wager some areas they were working on then to put on public display, such as the engine room and engineering spaces, is probably open by now. Perhaps worth another visit.
 

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In this case it seems like the community in Long Beach needs to make a decision...

1) Either raise taxes or impose fees to help pay for the repairs AND provide a steady stream of money to pay for future ongoing maintenance. This doesn't have to be in the form of an income tax, property tax, or something similar- but maybe create a special tax district where businesses in the vicinity pay a bit more in taxes to help cover the repairs- with the hope that the improvement in the ship might generate additional customers who visit the area- driving up business to a point where the increase in revenue for those local businesses outpace the potential taxes. You could also propose a special sales tax just for the business district surrounding the ship. You'd need to have a study to see how different scenarios would work out the potential tax increases in comparison to likely revenue increases. My city created a special tax district around a new arena to help offset the cost that the city paid to help build the arena. Many people bitched about the new taxes- but after two years they are raking in the profits from the steady stream of people who frequent that arena- and often stop to shop and eat before/after the events at the arena. If they chose this option, they should figure out how to attract more people to the ship- because it's pretty clear that the current operational plan isn't bringing in enough people to pay for the costs of upkeep.
2) Seek private donors to help fund the repairs and the ongoing maintenance costs once it is repaired. Reach out to Cunard and Disney to start, and maybe some of the large cruise companies to see if they'd be willing to sponsor the ship in exchange for publicity/advertising. Cunard might have given up the ship decades ago- but they might have an interest in ensuring that the ship stays afloat and in business.
3) Sell it to the scrap yard. Yes, it's a piece of history and people in Long Beach want to keep it, but unless they are willing to pay for it, it's not feasible to keep it afloat. As a person who loves history, this isn't the most preferred option. There are very few of these ships left- but in the end, if it costs too much to keep afloat, it may have to join the many other ships from this era and head to the scrap yard.
Another option would be to tow it out, and sink it for an artificial reef.
 

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I've visited the Missouri, and it was a great tour. That was about five years ago, and I'll wager some areas they were working on then to put on public display, such as the engine room and engineering spaces, is probably open by now. Perhaps worth another visit.
I'd love to see the Missouri again, especially without time constraints. Then to the Arizona Memorial.
 

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I'd love to see the Missouri again, especially without time constraints. Then to the Arizona Memorial.
I misspoke myself earlier when I mentioned the Missouri. I had a brain fart because I was referring to the U.S.S. Iowa in Long Beach and not the Missouri at Pearl Harbor which I have not seen. I have seen the Arizona memorial, but that was almost thirty years ago. I'd like to go back and, like you said, visit both ships on the same day. Literally too cool for school.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
In this case it seems like the community in Long Beach needs to make a decision...

1) Either raise taxes or impose fees to help pay for the repairs AND provide a steady stream of money to pay for future ongoing maintenance. This doesn't have to be in the form of an income tax, property tax, or something similar- but maybe create a special tax district where businesses in the vicinity pay a bit more in taxes to help cover the repairs- with the hope that the improvement in the ship might generate additional customers who visit the area- driving up business to a point where the increase in revenue for those local businesses outpace the potential taxes. You could also propose a special sales tax just for the business district surrounding the ship. You'd need to have a study to see how different scenarios would work out the potential tax increases in comparison to likely revenue increases. My city created a special tax district around a new arena to help offset the cost that the city paid to help build the arena. Many people bitched about the new taxes- but after two years they are raking in the profits from the steady stream of people who frequent that arena- and often stop to shop and eat before/after the events at the arena. If they chose this option, they should figure out how to attract more people to the ship- because it's pretty clear that the current operational plan isn't bringing in enough people to pay for the costs of upkeep.
2) Seek private donors to help fund the repairs and the ongoing maintenance costs once it is repaired. Reach out to Cunard and Disney to start, and maybe some of the large cruise companies to see if they'd be willing to sponsor the ship in exchange for publicity/advertising. Cunard might have given up the ship decades ago- but they might have an interest in ensuring that the ship stays afloat and in business.
3) Sell it to the scrap yard. Yes, it's a piece of history and people in Long Beach want to keep it, but unless they are willing to pay for it, it's not feasible to keep it afloat. As a person who loves history, this isn't the most preferred option. There are very few of these ships left- but in the end, if it costs too much to keep afloat, it may have to join the many other ships from this era and head to the scrap yard.
My suggestion would be to have the Queen Mary featured heavily in travel advertising, top listing song, or an MCU or DC Comics movie. Also, there should be a big budget movie about a wartime transatlantic crossing on the Queen Mary from New York City to Scotland, showing it's importance in World War 2 as a troopship. This movie would be along the long of Titanic, Saving Private Ryan, or Dunkirk. These options could make the Queen Mary a profitable attraction finally and help pay for repairs and maintenance.
 
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