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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everybody,
My 2021 HB has the Cvt and love it’s performance in manual with sport mode on. However, I am hesitant to continue further with the car because I am skeptical with the reliability of the Cvt. I do not plan to add any power to the vehicle. I have suspensions mods and sticky summers tires. Has any one experienced Cvt failure? Can I expect 200k miles out of the transmission with weekly spirited canyon drives?
 

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19 Corolla HB SE 6-spd
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7,779 Posts
I ordered a used one from a 2021 with less than 2,000 kms on it. Thats as close to brand new as you can get. Paid extra for warranty and shipping to my Mechanic’s Garage. Warranty includes 1 year parts and labor unlimited milage. Total $1832.86.

Will get it installed on Thursday next week. Labour total is $700+tax, + cost of oil and any new seals that might have to be purchased for the install.
View attachment 379381

I can’t burn more time ‘resolving’ this issue. Time is $. 🙃
Speedometer Odometer Trip computer Tachometer Gauge



2019 XSE Hatchback - TRANSMISSION PROBLEMS 😡 | Toyota Nation Forum
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A great thread for review but one instance is not enough to make a good decision. Manuals are hard to come by plus the costs of CA tax to sell and re-buy. I agree with what was mentioned in the thread about product knowledge. It is frustrating there is so little expertise on these Cvt transmissions both in maintenance and troubleshooting.
 

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19 Corolla HB SE 6-spd
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7,779 Posts
A great thread for review but one instance is not enough to make a good decision. Manuals are hard to come by plus the costs of CA tax to sell and re-buy. I agree with what was mentioned in the thread about product knowledge. It is frustrating there is so little expertise on these Cvt transmissions both in maintenance and troubleshooting.
Replacing your CVT fluid is easy, if you wish to maintain it. Your K120 CVT was manufactured by Aisin.

Aisin ATF-TFE - REPLACES TOYOTA P/N 08886-02505

ATF-TFE Product Annoucement copy (aisinaftermarket.com)

AISIN ATFTFE Transmission Fluid | RockAuto

Finally got around to fully changing the AT fluid. Like before 1.5 Qts drained out after removing the drain plug and another 3 Qts after removing the plastic level plug, total 4.5 Qts.

The plastic piece you can remove with a Phillips or screwdriver, or even your pinky finger, it wasn’t torqued down in there. So I put it back the same way.

 

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I have a 2020 SE CVT with 20k and recently got codes P2757 and P2820. Car went into LIMP mode and could not drive past 35mph

Basically I was driving normal, then when accelerating the car would not upshift and was bouncing off the rev limiter. Seconds later, CEL came on, and went into LIMP mode

Pulled to the side of the road, but the car in P and waited about 5min to take in everything that just happened. Put back into D, and the car would not catch first gear. No throttle response from gas pedal. Repeated this 3 times, and finally the car went back into gear and I was able to drive the car in LIMP mode

Car is currently at Toyota dealer being looked at. I will plan to make thread and full video review depending on what I find out
 
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2022 Mazda CX-30 CE (Carbon), AWD
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From what I have read about chain/belt design CVTs over the years in researching vehicles & such, I wouldn't want one, or trust one much past any extended powertrain warranty period. The very different eCVT design (especially from Toyota), on the other hand, seems like a much better investment & has proven much more reliable/durable over time (as the Pruis has shown for many years now) - but those are limited to hybrid & EV vehicles only. Thus, I personally would buy a hybrid if I was going to go that route & purchase a vehicle with a non-geared "CVT" automatic of some type.
 
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I have a 2020 SE CVT with 20k and recently got codes P2757 and P2820. Car went into LIMP mode and could not drive past 35mph

Basically I was driving normal, then when accelerating the car would not upshift and was bouncing off the rev limiter. Seconds later, CEL came on, and went into LIMP mode

Pulled to the side of the road, but the car in P and waited about 5min to take in everything that just happened. Put back into D, and the car would not catch first gear. No throttle response from gas pedal. Repeated this 3 times, and finally the car went back into gear and I was able to drive the car in LIMP mode

Car is currently at Toyota dealer being looked at. I will plan to make thread and full video review depending on what I find out
Lucky this happened under the warranty period.
 

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2021 Avalon XSE Hybrid
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Mine was fine when the car was totaled in an accident.
5 years, 120,000 miles. Replaced the fluid at 80k.
One member here got over 300k on his... it was ultimately the top end of his engine that failed. He didn't change the ATF until around 150k, then changed it every 50 or 60k after that.

These Toyota CVT transmissions are rock solid.
 

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19 Corolla HB SE 6-spd
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From what I have read about chain/belt design CVTs over the years in researching vehicles & such, I wouldn't want one, or trust one much past any extended powertrain warranty period. The very different eCVT design (especially from Toyota), on the other hand, seems like a much better investment & has proven much more reliable/durable over time (as the Pruis has shown for many years now) - but those are limited to hybrid & EV vehicles only. Thus, I personally would buy a hybrid if I was going to go that route & purchase a vehicle with a non-geared "CVT" automatic of some type.
Hybrids (not EV's) have an eCVT which is actually a planetary gear Power Split Device... They are also easier to maintain, as the eCVT fluid can be completely drained and refiled (about 3.5 liters) like a manual gear box.
 

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Hello everybody,
My 2021 HB has the Cvt and love it’s performance in manual with sport mode on. However, I am hesitant to continue further with the car because I am skeptical with the reliability of the Cvt. I do not plan to add any power to the vehicle. I have suspensions mods and sticky summers tires. Has any one experienced Cvt failure? Can I expect 200k miles out of the transmission with weekly spirited canyon drives?
My wife’s 2013 Accord developed problems early-on, and we brought the car back into the dealership and they changed the entire unit! I believe the system was relatively new to the Accord models then Honda wasn’t taking chances with newly purchased vehicles. Later, backing out from our garage, at a slight incline, the CVT was what I would call sluggish or hesitant to complete the task - slow reverse on an incline. Surprisingly, that was the only negative found with the CVT.
 

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Ignore what the dealer says about "sealed unit" the fluid will last the life of the transmission, which will be shorter if you don't change the fluid. My 2014 Corolla needed a new transmission at 96K miles. My next car has a stick. Changing fluid is not a trival thing. They have made it difficult - you need to know the temperature of the existing fluid, overfill and let excess drain. There are YouTube videos on this.
 

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What worries me, will the Dealer do a proper fluid change procedure or will they rush that too? How do you find a compendant Toyota dealership that has a professional experience tech doing the job not some kid out of high school?
 

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What worries me, will the Dealer do a proper fluid change procedure or will they rush that too? How do you find a compendant Toyota dealership that has a professional experience tech doing the job not some kid out of high school?
Around here you have to schedule your appointment at a time that's convenient for you and allow extra if any problems come up.
 

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2021 Avalon XSE Hybrid
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What worries me, will the Dealer do a proper fluid change procedure or will they rush that too? How do you find a compendant Toyota dealership that has a professional experience tech doing the job not some kid out of high school?
A pan dump and refill every 50,000 miles is simple and not a big deal.
You can check the temperature of the fluid with a meat thermometer.
Ideal temp for checking the level with the "straw" that is installed in the pan is in the range of 104 to 110 F.
The biggest difficulty for DIY is elevating the car so you can work under it AND getting it level. You'll need a level surface to work on, and 4 jack stands to keep the car level.
 

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A pan dump and refill every 50,000 miles is simple and not a big deal.
You can check the temperature of the fluid with a meat thermometer.
Ideal temp for checking the level with the "straw" that is installed in the pan is in the range of 104 to 110 F.
The biggest difficulty for DIY is elevating the car so you can work under it AND getting it level. You'll need a level surface to work on, and 4 jack stands to keep the car level.
Thats the problem leveling the car on four jacks. That makes me nervous being under the car then starting the car, put in special mode while rapidly shifting from D and P. From what I hear Toyota usually charges between $300 and $400 for the procedure rather just have them do it.
 

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2021 Avalon XSE Hybrid
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Thats the problem leveling the car on four jacks. That makes me nervous being under the car then starting the car, put in special mode while rapidly shifting from D and P. From what I hear Toyota usually charges between $300 and $400 for the procedure rather just have them do it.
Yep... I had mine done when I took it in for the software update.
I'll do oil changes, brakes and such, but working in the condo parking lot, I have to be discreet and quick.
Level ain't gonna' happen, and all 4 corners on stands won't neither.
 

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Hello everybody,
My 2021 HB has the Cvt and love it’s performance in manual with sport mode on. However, I am hesitant to continue further with the car because I am skeptical with the reliability of the Cvt. I do not plan to add any power to the vehicle. I have suspensions mods and sticky summers tires. Has any one experienced Cvt failure? Can I expect 200k miles out of the transmission with weekly spirited canyon drives?
Don’t think anybody here would have enough real life data to answer your question. The HB is a new model introduced in 2018. Some bits and pieces may be carried over from previous models, but the CVT is a new design. Any car will deteriorate being driven over time, faster if you beat on them harder. If you want it to last, all you can do is to maintain it the best you can, or beat on it less, or both. Toyota has a good history of making long lasting cars, but until we have some meaningful real life data, we can only give you our wild guesses.
BTW, if you don’t already know, the engine is also new. Would it last longer than the CVT with your weekly spirited canyon drives? Definitely may be.
 

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2019 Corolla Hatchback SE - CVT
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A pan dump and refill every 50,000 miles is simple and not a big deal.
You can check the temperature of the fluid with a meat thermometer.
Ideal temp for checking the level with the "straw" that is installed in the pan is in the range of 104 to 110 F.
The biggest difficulty for DIY is elevating the car so you can work under it AND getting it level. You'll need a level surface to work on, and 4 jack stands to keep the car level.
the system has temp sensors you can read off with a Live Data scanner like Carista into Torque Pro
 

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2020 Corolla SE sedan 6-mt
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Any car will deteriorate being driven over time, faster if you beat on them
^^^This.

I always try to be gentle on my machinery. I want things to last a long time and cost me as little money as possible to run.. You can drive "sporty" without beating up on a car. The trick is to be the King (or Queen) of Smooth, in acceleration, stopping, cornering. shifting. And avoiding the upper reaches of the tachometer. Plus of course regular maintenance.

I owned several piston-engine aircraft over the years. You'll never see an aircraft owner shove the throttle forward. It's always a slow increase in power. By doing that, along with regular maintenance, I've never had to replace a jug on an engine, even high-time engines.

Formula 1 drivers are fast, but they also are smooth. Be kind to your machinery! If you want to beat up on a car, do it on a rental instead! (and never buy a used rental!)
 
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