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CVT Life-span worries

8281 Views 106 Replies 29 Participants Last post by  igzy
Hello everybody,
My 2021 HB has the Cvt and love it’s performance in manual with sport mode on. However, I am hesitant to continue further with the car because I am skeptical with the reliability of the Cvt. I do not plan to add any power to the vehicle. I have suspensions mods and sticky summers tires. Has any one experienced Cvt failure? Can I expect 200k miles out of the transmission with weekly spirited canyon drives?
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2022 Mazda CX-30 CE (Carbon), AWD
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Any car will deteriorate being driven over time, faster if you beat on them
True, but some designs/implementations will deteriorate faster than others, & perhaps be more stressed by certain driving behaviors. That is why the typical lifespans of chain/belt CVT designs is remarkably shorter & more prone to random failure than that of an eCVT design, for example. Same can be said of different types/sizes of geared automatics & even manuals.
 

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When draining the old fluid save it in a receptacle and measure the volume drained then put the same amount back and you should be very close provided the old fluid level was correct.. Then drive for the recommended time and ambient temperature and then measure with dipstick(if you have one) and you'll probably need to add a little fluid. Repeat until perfect. You may also consider switching to a synthetic fluid if you were on regular CVT fluid. Since most transmissions are damaged by heat, a transmission cooler would very likely extend the life of the CVT and are very easy to install.
 

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st185 GTFour CS
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When draining the old fluid save it in a receptacle and measure the volume drained then put the same amount back and you should be very close provided the old fluid level was correct.. Then drive for the recommended time and ambient temperature and then measure with dipstick(if you have one) and you'll probably need to add a little fluid. Repeat until perfect. You may also consider switching to a synthetic fluid if you were on regular CVT fluid. Since most transmissions are damaged by heat, a transmission cooler would very likely extend the life of the CVT and are very easy to install.
That's what I always do when I drain-fill automatic transmission. Just measure the extracted fluid volume and put exactly the same.

Based on my experience, I recommend going with the OEM fluid. I've had bad experiences using others with some transmissions, even manual ones.
 

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2021 Avalon XSE Hybrid
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True, but some designs/implementations will deteriorate faster than others, & perhaps be more stressed by certain driving behaviors. That is why the typical lifespans of chain/belt CVT designs is remarkably shorter & more prone to random failure than that of an eCVT design, for example. Same can be said of different types/sizes of geared automatics & even manuals.
Please leave the eCVT out of the discussion. It is completely irrelevant and causes confusion.
The eCVT has nothing in common with a conventional transmission or CVT transmission beyond the aluminum case and it sits between the engine and driveshaft(s).
eCVT has no clutches, no bands, no belts, no torque convertor, and no reverse gear (or any changeable gears for that matter).
It is effectively a differential connecting the driveshaft(s) to the ICE and two electric motors.

There is no evidence to show that the Toyota CVT used in the Corolla since 2014 has any difference in lifespan/durability than the conventional transmissions.
There was one recall where a software issue could potentially cause damage to a solenoid/valve. My '16 had 90k on it when I had the recall done, and their testing indicated no damage was present. It continued to run fine until the car was totaled at 120k.

The CVT was in use outside of the North American market in the 10th Gen Corolla platform prior to it coming here in 2014.

Refer to user @Di3S3L experience going beyond 300,000. His valve train failed before the transmission.
The Corolla CVT actually has fewer clutches than a conventional transmission, and the belt should not be slipping.
 

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Replacing your CVT fluid is easy, if you wish to maintain it. Your K120 CVT was manufactured by Aisin.

Aisin ATF-TFE - REPLACES TOYOTA P/N 08886-02505

ATF-TFE Product Annoucement copy (aisinaftermarket.com)

AISIN ATFTFE Transmission Fluid | RockAuto




Thats the problem leveling the car on four jacks. That makes me nervous being under the car then starting the car, put in special mode while rapidly shifting from D and P. From what I hear Toyota usually charges between $300 and $400 for the procedure rather just have them do it.
🤑🤢🤮🤮(n) That's if they will do it telling people BS about lifetime fluids and maintance schedules. That's why I would do it myself but I am no mechanic with proper tools, space and equipment. $300-$400+ is alot for frequent maintenance when you must go to the stealership for this service.
 

· 19 Corolla HB SE 6-spd
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🤑🤢🤮🤮(n) That's if they will do it telling people BS about lifetime fluids and maintance schedules. That's why I would do it myself but I am no mechanic with proper tools, space and equipment. $300-$400+ is alot for frequent maintenance when you must go to the stealership for this service.
Replacing all of the 1.5 liter (1.6 US quart) of Red Line MT-LV in my manual transmission every 60,000 kms is pretty easy.
 

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When draining the old fluid save it in a receptacle and measure the volume drained then put the same amount back and you should be very close provided the old fluid level was correct.. Then drive for the recommended time and ambient temperature and then measure with dipstick(if you have one) and you'll probably need to add a little fluid. Repeat until perfect. You may also consider switching to a synthetic fluid if you were on regular CVT fluid. Since most transmissions are damaged by heat, a transmission cooler would very likely extend the life of the CVT and are very easy to install.
More money $$$spent🤑 on parts and labor at stealership on a car that is suppose to be known for low maintenance and cost with super reliability from the factory?????🤔
Many of us are not mechanics or have the space, tools, and proper equipment to do this so off to the stealership that's if stealership will do this since it will void warranty as it doesn't come from factory as equipped above.
Replacing all of the 1.5 liter (1.6 US quart) of Red Line MT-LV in my manual transmission every 60,000 kms is pretty easy.
In a CVT Transmission?
 

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Then drive for the recommended time and ambient temperature and then measure with dipstick(if you have one) and you'll probably need to add a little fluid. Repeat until perfect. You may also consider switching to a synthetic fluid if you were on regular CVT fluid.
The car also has a mode to reach required temperature. No more dipstick in transmission (whether auto or CVT) nowadays. Corolla CVTs (K313 as well as K120) are compatible with only one specific type of fluid: CVT-FE, so regular vs synthetic doesn't apply.
 

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The vehicle is warrantied up to 100,000 miles; if you don't feel confident in the transmission then just trade it in at that point. Nobody knows how long they'll last because they haven't been used for that long.
Where does it say 100k mile warranty on a corolla CVT Transmission? Last I looked the warranty booklet said 5 years or 60k miles on my '21 Hatchback?
 

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My bad, I was thinking of the certified warranty. I guess they give you a little more breathing room if you purchase one that has a few miles on it already
I was thinking about the extended warranty like the Toyota Certified. My thinking is they wouldn't cover the CVT if they didn't believe it to be reliable up to 100k miles.
 

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2020 Corolla SE CVT, 2020 RAV4 LE AWD
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The vehicle is warrantied up to 100,000 miles; if you don't feel confident in the transmission then just trade it in at that point. Nobody knows how long they'll last because they haven't been used for that long.
In the US Market, the K120 Direct-Shift CVT and M20A-FKS is only found in the Corolla, Corolla Cross, and Corolla Hatchback. But in the rest of the world this same powertrain is found in the Toyota Rav4, Avalon, Camry, Harrier (Venza), to name a few. Much larger, heavier, and much more expensive vehicles, mind you.
 

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Hello everybody,
My 2021 HB has the Cvt and love it’s performance in manual with sport mode on. However, I am hesitant to continue further with the car because I am skeptical with the reliability of the Cvt. I do not plan to add any power to the vehicle. I have suspensions mods and sticky summers tires. Has any one experienced Cvt failure? Can I expect 200k miles out of the transmission with weekly spirited canyon drives?
TCH close to 150k (CVT obviously) . Not to jinx-not a repair yet at all. Nevermind the almost 0 maintenance. (Don't want to go off topic)
 
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