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Hello everybody,
My 2021 HB has the Cvt and love it’s performance in manual with sport mode on. However, I am hesitant to continue further with the car because I am skeptical with the reliability of the Cvt. I do not plan to add any power to the vehicle. I have suspensions mods and sticky summers tires. Has any one experienced Cvt failure? Can I expect 200k miles out of the transmission with weekly spirited canyon drives?
If you want reliability keep your Corolla factory stock. I wouldn't mess with the power or the engine. Even the suspension. Just keep it factory Toyota. Does yours have paddle shifters? SE or XSE? Does the sport mode help in anyway for extra performance ?:unsure:
The vehicle is warrantied up to 100,000 miles; if you don't feel confident in the transmission then just trade it in at that point. Nobody knows how long they'll last because they haven't been used for that long.
I understand that the CVT has been in use since the generation before the current one since 2014? That would be an adequate amount to time to judge the reliability of the CVT in the Corolla. But I don't know if they used the first gear drive in the older generation Corollas like the current new ones.
 

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2019 Corolla Hatchback SE - CVT
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Rated for 90k in the maintenance schedule... I personally went for 60k because of my job requiring a lot of driving and I do beat on it pretty significantly because racecar and because Milwaukee Drivers are absolutely a species of their own.
 

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Rated for 90k in the maintenance schedule... I personally went for 60k because of my job requiring a lot of driving and I do beat on it pretty significantly because racecar and because Milwaukee Drivers are absolutely a species of their own.
90K is the suggested manufacturer's maintenance schedule? Under severe service it would be less?
 

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2019 Corolla Hatchback SE - CVT
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90K is the suggested manufacturer's maintenance schedule? Under severe service it would be less?

I just did it preemptively because i personally found 90k to be excessive even in normal use standards. If you like, run Sport Mode 24/7 and beat the hell out of it constantly, i'd go even as soon as 45k, then change it at regular intervals.

If my impression is correct, the transmissions will absolutely run fine, for a long time in fact. The physical first gear is a fantastic design tool for reducing the wear on the CVT belt and reduces less stress on it during a launch from a zero stop.

The downside to the directshift CVT is that because it has a Physical takeoff gear, it also has a torque converter, which means more fluid that can't leave the transmission on the first drain-fill, so in theory it might be best to do the initial Drain Fill, then do another one slightly earlier, then proceed as normal if you still have the car by then.


By the way the maintenance schedule goes, and by the way car ownership trends are these days, Toyota built the car to last a long time. But that doesn't mean they expect the average consumer to keep it to 100,000 miles. In reality their target is that most users are either going to lease the thing, or run it to somewhere in the 50s-60s range and trade it in.
 

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2019 Corolla Hatchback SE - CVT
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Remember too kids.

Get it done at the dealer. Don't be cheap and DIY or take it to some shop. You get what you pay for, and you also get the guarantee/insurance that if they screw it up that it's on them, not you.
Toyota OEM fluids are renowned for their quality. This includes dealer parts like oxygen sensors from Denso, and MAFs, Wheel bearings, etc.
 

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I just did it preemptively because i personally found 90k to be excessive even in normal use standards. If you like, run Sport Mode 24/7 and beat the hell out of it constantly, i'd go even as soon as 45k, then change it at regular intervals.

If my impression is correct, the transmissions will absolutely run fine, for a long time in fact. The physical first gear is a fantastic design tool for reducing the wear on the CVT belt and reduces less stress on it during a launch from a zero stop.

The downside to the directshift CVT is that because it has a Physical takeoff gear, it also has a torque converter, which means more fluid that can't leave the transmission on the first drain-fill, so in theory it might be best to do the initial Drain Fill, then do another one slightly earlier, then proceed as normal if you still have the car by then.


By the way the maintenance schedule goes, and by the way car ownership trends are these days, Toyota built the car to last a long time. But that doesn't mean they expect the average consumer to keep it to 100,000 miles. In reality their target is that most users are either going to lease the thing, or run it to somewhere in the 50s-60s range and trade it in.
I tend to keep my cars 20 to 30 years so I need longetivity.
 

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I just did it preemptively because i personally found 90k to be excessive even in normal use standards. If you like, run Sport Mode 24/7 and beat the hell out of it constantly, i'd go even as soon as 45k, then change it at regular intervals.

If my impression is correct, the transmissions will absolutely run fine, for a long time in fact. The physical first gear is a fantastic design tool for reducing the wear on the CVT belt and reduces less stress on it during a launch from a zero stop.

The downside to the directshift CVT is that because it has a Physical takeoff gear, it also has a torque converter, which means more fluid that can't leave the transmission on the first drain-fill, so in theory it might be best to do the initial Drain Fill, then do another one slightly earlier, then proceed as normal if you still have the car by then.


By the way the maintenance schedule goes, and by the way car ownership trends are these days, Toyota built the car to last a long time. But that doesn't mean they expect the average consumer to keep it to 100,000 miles. In reality their target is that most users are either going to lease the thing, or run it to somewhere in the 50s-60s range and trade it in.
When you run it in sport mode if you get that option that raises the rpm's on the engine = more wear n tear on engine?
 

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Blue car
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... why didn't Toyota just stick with a conventional automatic transmission for the Corolla like on older models or the 6 spd. manual transmission both of which are both more durable than the CVT Direct drive?
Hmmm … Is this true? I saw people expressed worry about the reliability of this CVT, and speculations based on older designs and non Toyota CVTs, but I did not see any wide spread Corolla CVT issues being reported. Is there real data to show this CVT is less durabe than conventional AT and MT? With the CVT providing better fuel efficiency, and programmable for drivability, I can see CVT will quickly take over as the transmission of choice with ICE by most manufacturers. In the next few years, the availability of conventional AT and MT will be rare.
 

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both of which are both more durable than the CVT Direct drive?
Two reasons : cost and efficiency (for both performance and mpg). Plus the take rate of manual is around 1%, not a very good buisiness case. That being said, outside North America, CVT are as old as automatics, Toyota have been using them for more than 20 years, the one from the previous generation Corolla was already a few years old when it came to North America (2014 model year) and was still used in some variants of the current generation until 2023 model year. Indeed, the Direct Shift CVT is only 4 years old but all in all, there is no indication that CVT are less durable.
 

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Hmmm … Is this true? I saw people expressed worry about the reliability of this CVT, and speculations based on older designs and non Toyota CVTs, but I did not see any wide spread Corolla CVT issues being reported. Is there real data to show this CVT is less durabe than conventional AT and MT? With the CVT providing better fuel efficiency, and programmable for drivability, I can see CVT will quickly take over as the transmission of choice with ICE by most manufacturers. In the next few years, the availability of conventional AT and MT will be rare.
Alot of the unreliability came from the Nissan brand CVT. CVT is suppose to give the best MPG. I am hearing mostly positive results of latest Corolla gas models with CVT.
 

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Alot of the unreliability came from the Nissan brand CVT
And actually from one specific iteration : the Nissan-Jatco JF011E that had a severe heat management issue. It was later solved but not without leaving many units already permanently damaged. And since the JF011E was also used by Jeep, Dodge, Mitsubishi and Suzuki it kind of tinted the general perception of CVT after that. But the infamous JF011E is not «all» CVT.
 

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And actually from one specific iteration : the Nissan-Jatco JF011E that had a severe heat management issue. It was later solved but not without leaving many units already permanently damaged. And since the JF011E was also used by Jeep, Dodge, Mitsubishi and Suzuki it kind of tinted the general perception of CVT after that. But the infamous JF011E is not «all» CVT.
So with the new Toyota Corolla with first drive grear CVT we can feel confident that's it's a reliable transmission?
 

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2022 Mazda CX-30 CE (Carbon), AWD
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I'm sure that stop & go driving & short trips vs regular extended highway cruising plays a big part in how the various mechanicals hold up over XXXXX amount of miles. It's safe to assume lower lifespan & reliability if most of your driving is the former rather than the latter.
 
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