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Discussion Starter #1
I had a stuck passenger side axle on 09 Camry, it was stuck in the bearing carrier/bracket like everyone has dealt with in this forum and elsewhere. I followed the idea on a youtube video, which was to remove the "keeper bolt," or retainer bolt that is on the side of the bearing carrier, and thread in a longer bolt and tighten it until it cracks the bearing race and this should help get the axle unstuck. Even after doing that, I still had to use a punch in there to break the rest of the bearing and race but eventually it worked and the axle got unstuck.

However, I damaged the threads in the process, and a thread chaser wouldn't help as some of the threads were gone and it's too wide for rethreading. So I can't get the bolt back in there that's supposed to go in there. But I'm wondering if it's really such a big deal. I'm not exactly sure what the function of that bolt is in the first place. There's a retaining snap ring on one end and the carrier has a retaining lip on the other end. Am I ok just leaving it off???
 

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1995 Camry LE Wagon
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Drill the hole to next larger bolt size then retap. You could even use english thread tap if metric to hard to find. Use grade 8 bolt hardness.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It would have to be english thread because next size is M11 and that doesn't really exist, or rare at least.

But that wouldn't accomplish anything anyway. The bolt itself isn't long enough to reach to the bearing. Apparently there's a rubber tip that the bolt presses into which presses into the bearing, and that piece is long gone. I kind of suspect that many people who do this job and really beat up on that bracket end up without that rubber piece. In which case the bolt is literally doing absolutely nothing.

Which once again begs the question, why exactly is this bolt needed again in the first place?
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Don't over think it: Just because you or I don't know the answer, they absolutely would not have included it if it wasn't necessary to prevent some kind of trouble.

Note that if you drill it larger and then use a regular bolt which doesn't have the rubber tip you run the risk of damaging the new bearing (there's other posts on here of folks who'd done that by mistake). Another option would be to fit a heli-coil insert to restore the original threads (this is how a machine shop would do it). Either drill, tap, insert while in place, or remove the whole housing / rear engine mount and do it on a workbench.

Norm
 

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'00 4 Cyl. Auto Camry LE
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The bolt is there to place tension on the outer bearing race, and prevent it from shifting in the carrier bracket. If you are confident the fitment of the new bearing in the carrier is good, you might try leaving it out, but would seal up the hole to prevent water / dirt intrusion: a rubber plug, a bolt inserted into a length of rubber hose to fill the gap, some RTV to form a plug, etc.

I do agree w/ Norm that doing a proper repair would be the best way to address it though.
 

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It would have to be english thread because next size is M11 and that doesn't really exist, or rare at least.
Go M12 then, not a big issue as long as there is enough meat to drill.

The bolt itself isn't long enough to reach to the bearing.
Buy a longer bolt.

Apparently there's a rubber tip that the bolt presses into which presses into the bearing, and that piece is long gone.
[/QUOTE]

Find a rubber spare from something else. I do bench engineering all the time on my 95.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The bolt is there to place tension on the outer bearing race, and prevent it from shifting in the carrier bracket. If you are confident the fitment of the new bearing in the carrier is good, you might try leaving it out

LOL there is no way that that bearing race is shifting, quite a fair amount of pounding was needed to get that bearing to finally sit in the carrier.

Anyway, the only possible motion that that bearing race could theoretically do in there (which I'm pretty sure is not going to happen in this instance) is circular, which is to say that in theory the race could rotate ALONG with the bearing, which I guess they're trying to prevent. Because its movement in any other possible direction is prevented by its placement design. If this "worst case" scenario of the race rotating occurred, I can't imagine anything catastrophic would occur. Yes, I realize they designed it this way for a reason, that it's ideal for the race to be fixed in place. I just don't know what would happen if it rotates. And anyway can't imagine how it could possibly rotate in my application even if it wanted to. I live in the rust belt 😀😀

And I did peer in the hole while rotating the axle with the bearing, and the race indeed remained stationary.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Google seems to indicate that the reason it is desired for a race to remain stationary is to limit wear to the area between the bearing and the race, and to prevent wear to the housing. I'm feeling fine about leaving it out. Thanks to all for your advice and suggestions though!

Earlier when I was pounding in the axle to get it to seat in the carrier, I was regretting not sanding down the rust lip in there before reinstalling. Now I'm happy I didn't, because it will keep the race from moving.
 

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'00 4 Cyl. Auto Camry LE
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LOL there is no way that that bearing race is shifting, quite a fair amount of pounding was needed to get that bearing to finally sit in the carrier.
On a properly cleaned & prepped carrier - that bearing would have slid right in there, like a knife through warm butter ... just saying. Hence the bolt.

Google seems to indicate that the reason it is desired for a race to remain stationary is to limit wear to the area between the bearing and the race, and to prevent wear to the housing.
That's true: there are torsional forces at work, from both sides of the axle.

Earlier when I was pounding in the axle to get it to seat in the carrier, I was regretting not sanding down the rust lip in there before reinstalling. Now I'm happy I didn't, because it will keep the race from moving.
That will certainly lock it in the carrier! If you had to pound it in, it ain't moving anywhere.
 

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All the bolts I've removed from these have the rubber squished so far down that it can't be putting much pressure on the outer race. If you compare a new one to an old one there's a drastic difference in length of the rubber tip.

You could use some loctite sleeve retainer but like you said I think you're going to be fine without it.
 
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