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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2009 Corolla LE. I accidentally cut the AC refrigerant liquid line, "Cooler Refrigerant Liquid Pipe A," Toyota Corolla Repair Manual: Refrigerant line - Heater & air conditioner. I've ordered a replacement.

I would like to ask how you disconnect this aluminum tube near the grommet union containing the AC pressure switch sensor and the adjoining refrigerant liquid line that snakes down and towards the front of the car. Please see the photo that shows this area circled in red. (BTW, the area circled in light yellow is where I cut the tube; it's covered with duct tape.)

Do I need to change the o rings on both sides of the new liquid line? If so, I'm hoping this universal o ring kit for car AC systems will work, https://www.autozone.com/cooling-he...-c-system-o-ring-gasket-kit-mt2584/121278_0_0.

Thanks in advance for your insight.

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How bad is the cut in the line?
Take it off and have a local radiator shop repair it, used to repair them regularly with a torch and aluminum stick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How bad is the cut in the line?
Take it off and have a local radiator shop repair it, used to repair them regularly with a torch and aluminum stick.
I believe the cut is too much to save the aluminum tube. I used an angle grinder to cut the top of the passenger side engine mount to access the screw (long story). While doing that, I accidentally hit the refrigerant liquid line, cutting off about 1/8". This is much more than a repairable slit. Even using a line splice kit may not work. Luckily, I was able to find an aftermarket one for a good price at Rock Auto.

I took a look at the AC pressure switch sensor and it appears it screws into the grommet and the refrigerant tube that I'm replacing. I hope it's a matter of unscrewing the sensor and removing the refrigerant tube but I'll stand by to hear from those who have done this task.


(Long Story: Attempted to replace passenger side control arm. Jacked up transmission after loosening transmission and front engine mounts. This is to gain access to the front-facing control arm bolt. I was able to remove the bolt.
However, I could not get the new control arm bushing in place no matter how hard I hit the control arm or used a pry bar on that bushing. I put back the old control arm, which was okay. Even this was tough. I must have jacked up the transmission and engine too much so that the engine was "hanging back-up" on the passenger side engine mount, shifting the top screw slightly out of view of the hole. I should have loosened this engine mount, too.
To lower and restore the engine-transmission's placement, I used an angle grinder to expand the hole on top of the mount that allows access to the screw. This screw connects the mounts two pieces: 1) frame and )engine. Was able to do so and loosen the passenger engine mount, straighten the engine-transmission, and reinstall all two engine and one transmission mounts. It would have ended okay except I cut the AC tube while using the angle grinder.)
 

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I feel your pain, I couldn’t find my glasses when cutting the exhaust on my highlander with a grinder, so I just reached up there and looked the other way. I put a nice cut in the yoke coming out of the trans and had to have it welded.🙄
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I feel your pain, I couldn’t find my glasses when cutting the exhaust on my highlander with a grinder, so I just reached up there and looked the other way. I put a nice cut in the yoke coming out of the trans and had to have it welded.🙄
Thanks. All it takes is looking away a split second or just being too hasty (in my case). I could have prevented cutting the AC line by simply twisting the angle grinder's plastic guard up 90 degrees or so. Live and learn.

I ordered the replacement refrigerant tube from Rock Auto on Monday (Labor Day), got the shipping notice with USPS tracking number on Tuesday, showing a label was created. Yet, it's Thursday and the item still has not been dropped off at the post office. I wonder why Rock Auto is so slow in shipping the item?
 

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I assume they're waiting for more packages to send via USPS. Warehouse B out of new York?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I assume they're waiting for more packages to send via USPS. Warehouse B out of new York?
According to the shipping info, the package is coming out of warehouse A. The tracking mentions a shipping label was created at a post office in Corona, California. I was expecting it this Saturday so I can install it and have AC starting next week. I'm in Hawaii and priority mail takes three days from California.

It looks like the package may come next week for installation next weekend (Sept. 18). I know we're in a pandemic but packages should be dropped off at the post office no later than two business days after placing and paying for an order. Oh well.
 

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I've had double charges for warehouse a and b coming out of new York. Makes no sense how they can double dip. Anyways......the USPS is swamped as is all others. I learned the hard way once. Paid express shipping the first time I ever ordered on RA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've had double charges for warehouse a and b coming out of new York. Makes no sense how they can double dip. Anyways......the USPS is swamped as is all others. I learned the hard way once. Paid express shipping the first time I ever ordered on RA.
Wow, that's not right that they charged you twice for shipping. It should just be one charge as it's on them to get them from warehouse to carrier to customer. I hope it's USPS holding on to the package due to being swamped versus Rock Auto being to busy to bring the package to the post office.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This parts diagram might help a bit.
ND Camry Owner, I appreciate your help in attaching that AC diagram. It helps me to see the parts and how they're connected. I feel more confident about changing the refrigerant line.

I will keep everyone posted on the status of this project. Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I received the replacement AC refrigerant line yesterday (Monday, Sept. 13). I got the USPS tracking email mentioning the item is out for delivery. I notice the tracking starts at "a shipping label was created" and jumps directly to "received at hub," skipping receipt of package by USPS. Oh well, it's here.

The tube was shipped in a large box as it's one long unit. I now notice the aluminum tube's connection ends with o rings are not bent in the same direction as where they need to be installed. For example:

  • The top of the tube needs to be at the expansion value near the car's firewall. The tube's end is now pointing towards 4 o'clock when it should be pointing at 12 o'clock.
  • The bottom of the tube's end needs to point left while it's now pointing to the right. It should also snake down and be installed pointing at around 7 o'clock (it's now pointing at 3 o'clock).

It looks like the tube needs to be bent. Should I rent a tube bender, https://www.autozone.com/loan-a-tools/loaner-tube-bender? Or, does this need to be taken to an AC shop.

Thanks in advance for your comments.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
After researching how to bend soft aluminum tubing, I rented a tube bender from Autozone, https://www.autozone.com/loan-a-too.../p/oemtools-heavy-duty-tube-bender/391367_0_0.
I opened the hood and began doing slight bends to the AC line. I then decided to take the plunge.

I removed the older tube. This involved removing a 10mm bolt holding the plate over the expansion valve near the firewall. Next was the bolt that holds the line to the condenser (front bottom of car). The 8mm head bolt holding the unit to a metal bracket was removed along with the nearby AC pressure switch sensor and electrical connection.

I then tried to insert the new AC tube near the front bottom of the car. I needed to manually bend the tube to be slightly straight and then maneuver it down the hole and rebend the tube with the 10mm bolt to the condenser. This section of the tube makes a 180 degree angle in relation to the center main rectangular piece. I tightened the 10mm bolt to the condenser connection.

The upper part of the line needed more bending work. I made the bends in this smaller tube match the nearby larger AC line. I inserted the new line into the firewall, placed the plate over it and the larger line, and tightened this 10mm bolt over the expansion valve.

I then installed the old AC pressure switch sensor and electrical connection to this new line.

Went to Autozone the next day to return the tube bender and buy a can of R-134a. I added it to the car and the AC blew ice cold air. I am happy.

I hope this thread can help someone who runs into this issue. Thanks to everyone who provided their insight.
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