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Well my brother in law's 2008 Camry V6 had an alternator die at 135K miles. I figured it was a good time to make a DIY for this job. This procedure is for the 2007-2011 Camry V6 but should apply pretty equally for the Avalon Sienna, ES350, or other 2GRFE vehicles, assuming they have a removable upper radiator support. This DIY will also provide steps on how to replace the drive belt, front bumper, coolant, and upper radiator support. Total time spent on this DIY was approximately 4 hours, including time to take pictures. Expect it to take around 3 hours.

Disclaimer: Myself or Toyotanation are not responsible for any damage or injury that may result from use of the DIY. Automotive maintenance and repair should be performed by qualified technicians. This DIY is for informational purposes, use it at your own risk.

Note: This job is long and tedious, but is actually very easy on a difficulty scale. Only basic hand tools are required. The biggest snag was getting the fan out of the car, which was not really that hard.

Note: No helper is required, but since the vast majority of this job is working on the same thing on both the driver and passenger side, a helper is recommended.

Tools and Parts needed:

3/8 inch Drive Ratchet (Flex head preferred)
3/8 inch Drive 10mm Socket
3/8 inch Drive 12mm Socket
3/8 inch Drive 14mm socket
3/8 inch Drive Extensions (3 and/or 6 inch)
10mm Box End or Combination Wrench (Ratcheting Preferred)
14mm Box End or Combination Wrench (Ratcheting Preferred)
#2 Phillips Screwdriver
Thin Blade or Pocket Flathead Screwdriver
Larger Blade Flathead Screwdriver
Pry Bar
Angle Noise Pliers
Needle Nose Pliers
Small Hose Pliers
Drain pan
Jack
Jack Stands
Brake parts cleaner
Gloves
Rags or towels
Coolant
Lisle Spill Free Funnel (Optional but Highly Preferred)
5/16" ID Hose Section (Optional but Preferred)
Multimeter (To Verify Repair)
5mm Pin or Similarly Sized Screw



Part numbers:

Alternator -
Toyota (Reman): US Built - 27060-0P141-84 Japan Built - 27060-31081-84
Denso (Reman): US Built - 2100654 Japan Built - 2100737

Drive Belt (if required) –
Toyota: 90916-A2010
Bando: 7PK2090
Gates/Napa Micro-V AT: K070822
Goodyear Gatorback: 4070825

Part numbers:
Splash shield clips: 90467-07214 (At least 25 as most the clips will likely break)

Coolant -
Check Maintenance Sticky: http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/104-5th-6th-generation-2002-2006-2007-2011/686945-official-5th-6th-gen-maintenance-thread-all-you-ever-wanted-know.html

Note: Like with most Toyotas built in two different countries, Toyota/Denso list two different alternators for US and Japan Built vehicles. Both alternators are interchangeable and identical. At Toyota the US alternator is significantly less expensive and on Rockauto, the Japan alternator is significantly less expensive. There is no difference between them and they have the same plug, mounting, amp rating, and pulley.

Note: All splash shields for this job are 7mm. Regardless of the type of clip you remove/break, you can use the above listed clip (lower shield clip, inner shield, radiator cover clip, etc.)

Warning: Hot engines and fluids can cause burns. You should only attempt this repair when the engine is cold.

Let's begin!

1. Park your car on a level surface, shut the engine off, and open the hood. If using a breaker bar or ratchet to remove the wheel, loosen it now before lifting. Jack the vehicle up and secure it on jack stands using either the frame rail or pinch weld.



2. Remove the engine cover. Lift up the engine cover by grasping it pretty much anywhere and pulling straight up. Place the engine cover to the side.



3. Remove the battery and battery tray. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet or 10mm wrench, separately loosen both battery terminals and remove them from the battery post. Remove the 10mm bolt holding the hold down to the front of the upper radiator support. Loosen the "J" bolt nut until you can unlock the bolt from the slot. Remove the J bolt and hold down. Remove the battery from the vehicle and set it aside. Lift the tray out of the vehicle and set it aside. Reinstall the front hold down bolt into the radiator support.

Note: I originally only removed the negative terminal. This bit me later when repositioning the lower air intake duct.

Note: It would be a good idea to save your radio presets now.

Note: I did not take pictures of this step.

4. Remove both the driver and passenger side lower splash shield. Depending on who has worked on your car previously or any kind of curbs you may have hit some of these may be missing. Using your flat head screwdriver remove the 3 push clips holding the splash shield by prying out the center section and removing the clip. Remove the 10mm screws securing each splash shield and small mud guard piece to the car and remove the splash shields and mud guard.

Note: When doing this job, both shields were missing. Pictured below is the driver side, but it is the same for the passenger side.

Note: Take note of the different types of screws used along the shield. Some have larger washers to account for larger openings.



5. Remove the passenger side inner splash shield. Turn the steering wheel all the way to the right. Remove the inner splash shield by removing the two 10mm bolts using your 10mm socket and ratchet and 1 plastic clip by depressing the center of the clip down until it unlocks and then using your fingers or screwdriver to remove the clip. Remove the inner splash shield from the vehicle.

Note: Driver side is pictured, but the procedure is identical.



6. Remove the upper radiator support cover. Using your thin blade screwdriver, pry out the center to the upper radiator support cover clips. Remove the cover and set it aside.



7. Remove the front bumper.

a. Using your #2 Phillips head screwdriver, remove the two Phillips head bolts securing the outer portions of the bumper to the radiator support.

b. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, remove the center bolt securing the upper portion of the bumper to the radiator support.

c. Using your flathead screwdriver, push the outer bumper clips inward to release the center. Pull the clip upward to remove the clip.

Note: There are several false clips on the bumper. The correct clip is just outside of the #2 Phillips head bolt on each side of the bumper.

d. Using your flathead screwdriver, turn the clip securing the wheel shield to the front bumper to the unlock (horizontal) position. Remove the clip by pulling it straight out.

e. With the clip removed, carefully pull back the wheel shield to expose the 10mm screw securing the front bumper to the fender. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, remove the 10mm screw securing the bumper to the fender.

f. Unplug the fog light connectors. Depress the center release and remove the fog light connector from the fog light bulb.

g. Carefully pull the bumper outward at the end where the bumper meets the fender, to unlock the bumper from the fender.

g. Repeat steps 6c - 6f for the other side.

h. Remove the bumper. Carefully pry the upper portion of the bumper up and over the radiator support. Remove the bumper from the vehicle and set it aside.

 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
8. Drain the engine coolant. Remove the radiator cap. Locate the radiator drain and attach your section of 5/16" ID hose to the drain port (if applicable). Place your drain pan under the radiator drain hose. Using your hands or a pair of needle noise pliers, turn the drain petcock counterclockwise a bit to allow the radiator to drain slowly. Once it begins to drain, remove your radiator cap. Open the drain until the maximum amount of fluid flows out of the hose, without leaking out of the threads of the petcock. Loosely place the radiator cap on top of the opening but do not secure it. Once draining complete, re-tighten the petcock using your hands and remove the 5/16" ID hose.



9. Drain the coolant reservoir. Using your hose pliers, remove the overflow hose from the radiator filler neck. Using your hands, lift the coolant reservoir straight up to remove it from the vehicle. Drain the reservoir and reinstall it into its bracket. Leave the overflow hose disconnected.



10. Remove the drive belt. Using your 14mm box end or combination wrench, turn the idler pulley counterclockwise (loosening) to loosen tension on the belt. While maintaining released tension on the belt, use your 5mm allen wrench or similarly sized pin or screw to lock the tensioner in place. Remove the drive belt from around all pulleys and set it aside (I put it around the passenger mirror).



11. Remove upper inlet duct from the upper radiator support. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, remove the two 10mm bolts securing the upper inlet duct to the radiator support. Using your hands, remove the two vacuum hoses which are pressed into the upper radiator support duct. Remove the upper inlet duct and set it aside. Place the bolts back into the radiator suppport for safekeeping.



12. Remove the lower inlet duct from the radiator support and air box. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, remove the 10mm bolt securing the lower inlet duct to the radiator support and lower air box. Remove the lower inlet duct and set it aside. Place the bolt back into the radiator suppport for safekeeping.



Note: Steps 12 through 15 do not have to be done in the following order. This order just makes it easiest to document.

13. Remove the wiring connections securing the horns and hood latch open indicator (XLE models) to the the front wiring harness. Using your finger or a flat head screwdriver, depress the center release and remove the horns and hood latch indicator harness.



14. Remove the hood latch assembly from the radiator support. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, remove the 10mm bolt holding the front upper portion of center support bar to the hood latch assembly. Using your 10mm wrench, remove the 10mm bolt holding the rear upper portion of the center support bar to the hood latch and radiator support. Then using your 10mm socket and ratchet, remove the two 10mm bolts securing the hood latch the upper radiator support. Lift the hood latch over the center support bar and unhook the cable where it is held to the upper radiator support. Remove the hood latch and set it aside.



15. Remove the center support bar. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, remove the 10mm bolt securing the center support bar to the lower radiator support. Remove the center support bar and set it aside.



16. Remove the upper radiator support. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, remove the four 10mm bolts securing the upper radiator support. Using your hands, carefully pull back on the top, middle, and bottom of the two plastic side covers to disengage them from the holes in the front apron. Lift up the upper radiator support and set it aside.

 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
17. Disconnect the radiator fan wiring. Locate the fan mounted fan controller/ECU. Using your finger or a flat head screwdriver, depress the center release and remove the large black fan main connector and remove it from the fan ECU. Locate the active engine mount wiring. Depress the center release and remove it from the active engine mount VSV. Remove the right wiring harness holder from the radiator fan. Using your needle nose pliers, depress the sides of the wiring holder and push the holder rearward to disengage it from the radiator fan.

Caution: The black connector was stuck to the ECU. I had to depress the center and carefully pry the connector body off the ECU with a screwdriver.



18. Remove the upper radiator hose from the radiator. Using your flathead screwdriver, open the wiring holder securing the oxygen sensor wire to the upper radiator hose. Using your needle nose pliers, depress the radiator hose clamp inward to lock it in the open position. Move the clamp downward on the hose. Using hose pliers, a pocket screwdriver, or your hand, carefully break the seal on the radiator hose and remove it from the radiator.

Caution: The oxygen sensor wire holder broke on this car. I replaced it with zipties.



19. Disengage the fan from the radiator. Locate the three holding clips at the top of the radiator fan. Using your needle nose pliers, squeeze the clips inward and pull the fan outward to disengage the fan from the radiator. You will need to do one at a time while slightly pulling the fan the entire time. Pull the fan towards the rear to disengage it from the radiator.



20. Remove the left wiring harness holder. Using a screwdriver or needle nose pliers, depress the sides of of the wiring holder and push it rearward to disengage it from the radiator fan. Remove the radiator fan harness and set it aside.



21. Remove the radiator fan assembly from the vehicle. Using your hands, carefully pull the radiator and condensor towards the front of the car to create space for the radiator fan. Carefully lift the radiator fan assembly out of the vehicle from the top. Set the fan aside.

Caution: Do not pull the radiator and condenser back too far or you may damage the A/C lines.

Note: This is the most difficult part of the entire job. The fan needs to come out at a slight foward tilt (top towards the front towards the front angle).

Note: This is another time when removing the lower intake duct would have made things easier.



22. Remove the alternator connector. Using your finger or a flat head screwdriver, depress the center release and remove the alternator connector.



23. Remove the alternator power wire. Using your flathead screwdriver, pop the cover off of the alternator terminal. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket or 10mm combination wrench, remove the 10mm nut securing the power wire to the alternator. Slide the wire of the terminal. Replace the nut on the alternator for safe keeping.

Warning: It is very important to have the battery disconnected. Severe injury, death, or damage could result from removing the power wire while the battery is connected.



24. Remove the wiring harness holder from the alternator and front valve cover. Using your small flat head screwdriver, push the center catch outwards (towards the driver side) and pull the holder from the alternator. Using your small flat head screwdriver, push the center catch outwards (towards the passenger side) and pull the holder from the valve cover.



25. Remove the large A/C compressor connector (main compressor harness). Using your finger or a flat head screwdriver, depress the center release and remove the alternator connector.



26. Remove the camshaft position sensor connector. Using your finger or a flat head screwdriver, depress the center release and remove the sensor connector.



27. Remove the lower radiator hose from the thermostat housing. Using your needle nose pliers, depress the radiator hose clamp inward to lock it in the open position. Move the clamp downward on the hose. Using hose pliers, a pocket screwdriver, or your hand, carefully break the seal on the radiator hose and remove it from the thermostat housing. Set the hose aside.



28. Remove the old alternator from the engine.

a. Using your ratchet and 14mm socket, remove the upper 14mm alternator mounting bolt securing the alternator to the engine.

b. Using your pry bar or screwdriver, carefully pry the threaded rear bushing to move it towards the rear of the alternator.

c. Using your 14mm wrench, remove the front lower 14mm alternator mounting bolt securing the alternator to the engine.

d. Locate the rear lower alternator mounting bracket.

e. Using your ratchet, extension, and 12mm socket, remove the bolt securing the rear alternator bracket to the engine.

f. Using your pry bar or large screwdriver, carefully pry the alternator away from the engine but do not attempt to remove it fully.

Caution: Do not pry too much or you may rip the compressor harness wiring out of the compressor pins.

g. Locate the wiring holder securing the A/C compressor harness to the alternator.

h. Using your needle nose pliers or screwdriver, depress the sides of of the wiring holder and push it downward to disengage it from the alternator.

i. Carefully remove the alternator from the vehicle.

Caution: Be careful not to contact the radiator assembly with the alternator.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
29. Swap the wiring harness holder, lower mounting bracket, and power wire nut from the old alternator to the new alternator. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, remove the front wiring holder bracket from the old alternator. Reinstall the bracket in the same orientation on the new alternator. Using your 12mm socket and ratchet, remove the lower mounting bracket from the old alternator. Reinstall the bracket in the same orientation on the new alternator. Remove the old power nut and temporarily install it on the new alternator.



30. Reinstall the new alternator onto the engine.

a. Set the alternator into position and using your hands, finger tighten all three alternator mounting bolts into their respective holes.

b. Reinstall the wiring harness into the holder you removed in step 27h.

c. Once all three bolts are threaded in, tighten the bolts in the reverse order of removal; rear lower bracket, lower front mounting, and upper mounting.



31. Reinstall the alternator and engine wiring. Reinstall the following connectors: camshaft position sensor connector, A/C compressor connector, alternator power wire, alternator connector, alternator wiring holder wiring, valve cover wiring holder.



32. Install the drive belt. With the tensioner still locked, use the diagram below to install the belt around the engine drive pulleys. Leaving the belt tensioner pulley for last will make it easiest. Once the belt is on all the pulleys and lined up correctly on all the grooves, using your 14mm box end or combination wrench, turn the idler pulley counterclockwise (loosening) to release the tension. Then with the belt tension still released, remove the pin or Allen wrench you used to secure the tensioner and slowly release the 14mm bolt to secure the drive belt.





33. Reinstall the radiator fans onto the radiator. Carefully lower the fans into position and line the clips up with the holes of the fan. Push the fan forward to lock into the radiator.

Caution: Make sure to install the lower hose in the radiator fan shroud hose slot. Failure to do so may cause the hose to rub and wear a hole in it.



34. Reinstall the radiator fan and engine wiring. Reinstall the two wiring harness holders by pushing the holders into the slots in the radiator fans. Reconnect the main Fan ECU and Active Engine Mount connectors.



35. Reinstall the radiator hoses. Seat the hoses fully on both the radiator and thermostat housing. Move the radiator clamps upward on the hose. Using your needle nose pliers, depress the clamp ears while carefully twisting to unlock the center catch of the clamp and lock the clamp in the open position. Reinstall the wiring holder securing the oxygen sensor wiring to the upper radiator hose.



36. Loosely install the upper radiator support. Guide the upper radiator support into position over the upper radiator mounting bushings. Place the upper radiator support into position and install the four outer mounting bolts finger tight.



37. Loosely install the hood latch assembly. Guide the hood latch into position by guiding the cable behind the driver side horn. Install the two outer hood latch bolts finger tight.



38. Loosely install the center support bar. Guide the upper portion of the support into position under the hood latch assembly. Install the one lower mounting bolt and two upper mounting bolts finger tight.



39. Carefully tighten the upper radiator support. Using your 10mm socket, ratchet, and extension, carefully tighten the upper radiator support.

Caution: Be sure to install the bolts in the original locations on the upper radiator support. Use the original bolt head impressions to make sure the bolts are correctly installed.

Caution: Failure to carefully align the bolts could result in a misaligned hood latch that may bind or break when used.

 

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40. Carefully tighten the center support bar and hood latch. Using your 10mm socket, ratchet, and extension, carefully tighten the two bolts securing the hood latch the upper radiator support. Using your 10mm socket, ratchet, and extension, carefully tighten the lower center bar to lower radiator support bolt. Using your 10mm wrench, carefully tighten the upper rear center support bar bolt onto the radiator support. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, carefully install the upper front center support bar bolt.

Caution: Be sure to install the bolts in the original locations on the upper radiator support. Use the original bolt head impressions to make sure the bolts are correctly installed.

Caution: Failure to carefully align the bolts could result in a misaligned hood latch that may bind or break when used.



41. Reinstall the radiator side covers. Using your hands, align the cover hole and slots and push the covers towards the rear of the vehicle to lock them into place.

42. Reinstall the horn and hood open indicator wiring connectors (XLE only).



43. Reinstall the lower intake duct. Maneuver the lower intake duct into position and ensure the duct is correctly fitted into the lower air box and water drain reservoir. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, reinstall the lower intake duct bolt.



44. Reinstall the upper intake duct. Maneuver the upper intake duct into position and ensure the duct is correctly fitted into the lower intake duct and upper air passage. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, reinstall the upper intake duct bolts. Push the two vacuum hoses back into the holder on the upper intake duct.



45. Reinstall the front bumper.

a. Carefully position the bumper onto the front of the vehicle.

b. Start by slipping the upper portion of the bumper over the upper radiator support.

c. Carefully line the sides of the bumper near the fender area and push inwards to lock the bumper into the fender.

d. Ensure the bumper is correctly installed on both sides.

e. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, reinstall the upper center bumper bolt.

f. Using your #Phillips head screwdriver, reinstall the two upper side bolts onto the bumper.

g. Reinstall the two 7mm clips securing the top of the bumper to the radiator support.

Note: There are several false clips on the bumper. The correct clip is just outside of the #2 Phillips head bolt on each side of the bumper.

h. Reinstall the fog light connectors (if equipped).

i. Reinstall the screws securing the bumper to the fender. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet, reinstall the screws securing the bumper to the fender on each side.

j. Reinstall the flathead bumper clip. Place the clip into position (horizontal) and push inward to seat the clip. Using your screwdriver, turn the clip to the vertical position to lock it into place.



46. Reinstall the reservoir overflow hose to the radiator. Push the hose onto the radiator inlet until fully seated.



47. Fill the engine coolant. Using your Lisle spill free funnel or other funnel, fill the engine with coolant. If using Zerex Asian, Toyota Pink, or other premixed coolant, add the entire gallon. If using Toyota Red, Pentofrost A1, or other concentrated coolants, mix the correct amount using distilled water and add roughly one gallon.

Caution: Make sure the radiator drain petcock was installed prior. Failure to do so will result in leaking out all of your new coolant.

Note: This Camry took slightly less than two gallons to do this job. However having 3 gallons is safest in case you lose a little more than I did.



48. Reinstall the battery. Place the battery tray into position by lining up the nubs in the plastic tray with the holes in the metal tray. Place the battery on the tray with the positive side toward the passenger side of the vehicle. Place the hold down, with "J" bolt installed, into position over the battery and install the front bolt finger tight. Reinstall the J bolt's hooked end into the hole in the at the rear of the battery (towards the air filter). Tighten the bolt securing the hold down to the upper radiator support. While holding the J bolt's hooked end upward to keep it tight in the hole, tighten the J bolt nut to secure the battery down.

49. Reinstall the battery terminals. Place the positive terminal into place. Using your 10mm wrench, tighten the positive terminal. Place the negative terminal into place. Using your 10mm wrench, tighten the negative terminal.

50. Do a pre-start check. Ensure your belt is correctly installed on all pulleys and fully seated, ensure all wiring and wiring holders are connected. Ensure there are no loose tools in an area where they may fall into the belt path or other unwanted areas.



51. Start the engine and check for leaks. If you find a leak. Stop and repair the source of the leak.

52. Bleed the cooling system. Set the temperature setting to full heat, A/C off, vent setting to face, and blower on high speed. Start the engine and allow it to bleed. If using a spill free funnel, you will see the bubbles in the reservoir. If not, you will see the bubbles in the filler neck though it may be a bit harder. The thermostat opens at 82°C/180°F, but the system usually is bled at around 90°C/195°F. Check for any coolant leaks while bleeding. The system is considered bled when the heat coming out of the vents is so hot that it burns your hand (meaning you can't keep your hand in front of it). Once the system is bled and no bubbles come out of the funnel/filler neck, remove the funnel and reinstall the radiator cap. If you used a spill free funnel, you can plug the funnel and use the remaining coolant to fill the reservoir. If not, fill the coolant reservoir the HOT level.

Caution: Keep an eye on the temperature gauge while bleeding. Failure to do so may result in an overheated engine if you miss overheating temperatures.

Note: You may have to rev the engine and squeeze the hoses to assist with bleeding.



53. Verify alternator output. Using a Digital Multimeter or Voltmeter, set the meter to measure DC Volts. Conduct a load test and ensure the alternator functions properly.

a. With the engine off, verify you have approximately 12-13V at the battery

b. With the engine still off, turn the headlights on and ensure the battery stays at approximately 12-13V for at least one minute.

c. Start the engine and allow it warm. With the engine at idle, check the votage at the battery and ensure it is at least 13.5 to 14.5 volts.

d. Turn on the high beam headlights, blower to max speed, and A/C on. Check the voltage after 2-3 minutes and ensure the voltage is still at approximately 13.5 to 14.5 volts.

Here is a video showing varying types of load tests:


Note: This reading was with blower at Max and headlights on after several minutes of running.



54. Install the inner splash shield. Using your 10mm socket and ratchet install the two bolts hand tight and one clip securing the inner splash shield.

55. Reinstall the lower splash shields. First using your brake parts cleaner liberally spray and clean any spilled fluid from under the car. Set the splash shield into position (remember that at the front of the splash shield/bumper area the splash shield extensions go under the bumper. Install your clips and screws. Be sure the the mud guard piece goes on the outside towards the wheel area. Remove the drain pan from under the car.



56. Lower the vehicle off of jack stands.

57. Install the engine cover. Line up the rubber engine cover holders with the appropriate cover mounting extensions on the engine and gently push down to secure the engine cover.



58. Install the upper radiator cover. Place the cover into position over the radiator and hood height adjusters and reinstall the clips.

Note: I had to literally replace every single clip on the upper radiator cover.



59. Go for a test drive and verify there are no leaks, overheating, noises, and that you installed the belt correctly (I cleaned the engine bay up as well).



Admire your work and money you saved!
 

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Holy mother of macaroni #([email protected]*!(*@

Ummm....so...alternator change on the 2GR is...umm...



No wonder I've seen a Gen3 Avalon with a bad alternator being sold cheap. Considering alternators in the 1MZ platform, I can get this done in a matter of 15 minutes....

I thought the IS250 4GR engine was a PITA for the alternator, this take the cake and the knife!

It's a good write up! Holy crud!
 

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Holy mother of macaroni #([email protected]*!(*@

Ummm....so...alternator change on the 2GR is...umm...



No wonder I've seen a Gen3 Avalon with a bad alternator being sold cheap. Considering alternators in the 1MZ platform, I can get this done in a matter of 15 minutes....

I thought the IS250 4GR engine was a PITA for the alternator, this take the cake and the knife!

It's a good write up! Holy crud!
It's really not that bad. If I was doing one without DIY, I expect it take 2 hours or less. It's a lot of small steps and nothing is hard to get to or difficult to remove.

Sure it's harder than a 1MZFE, but overall you do much less stuff to a 2GRFE than a 1MZFE/3MZFE.
 

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It's really not that bad. If I was doing one without DIY, I expect it take 2 hours or less. It's a lot of small steps and nothing is hard to get to or difficult to remove.

Sure it's harder than a 1MZFE, but overall you do much less stuff to a 2GRFE than a 1MZFE/3MZFE.
True. Although I seem to have a bad luck with alternators in general. I can't see myself having to remove everything in the front end just for the alternator. I don't know, maybe because I grew up with the mentality is if X is bad, all I need to remove is just stuff around the X and not also Y Z and the kitchen sick. Maybe because I had to do 3 alternator replacement in my 2004 XLE V6 in the last 3 years, I'd be pretty annoyed (and probably good at this).

I don't know, I'm just old school. I like 'straight forward' repairs and maintenance. Everything newer usually requires less maintenance but becomes a longer DIY if you do it.



But if I ever do get a 2GR engine it would be a toss between the 05/06 Avalon and the serviceable ATF or a Camry...but dang man it's so crammed that engine bay lol...
 

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True. Although I seem to have a bad luck with alternators in general. I can't see myself having to remove everything in the front end just for the alternator. I don't know, maybe because I grew up with the mentality is if X is bad, all I need to remove is just stuff around the X and not also Y Z and the kitchen sick. Maybe because I had to do 3 alternator replacement in my 2004 XLE V6 in the last 3 years, I'd be pretty annoyed (and probably good at this).

I don't know, I'm just old school. I like 'straight forward' repairs and maintenance. Everything newer usually requires less maintenance but becomes a longer DIY if you do it.



But if I ever do get a 2GR engine it would be a toss between the 05/06 Avalon and the serviceable ATF or a Camry...but dang man it's so crammed that engine bay lol...
The only repairs this car has needed in 135K was an axle and an alternator. It's 9.3 years old (built 02/2008) and drives like a dream.
 

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The only repairs this car has needed in 135K was an axle and an alternator. It's 9.3 years old (built 02/2008) and drives like a dream.
Post subtitle: How people learn to love the power of a 4 cylinder. Great documentation!
Probably one reason why a fair amount of manufactures are dumping the 6 and going with just the 4. Although yea, it is simple but having to deal with broken fasteners and screws are not fun and the chances that a nut or bolt would be stuck/sheared off is higher versus being smack dab right in the engine bay.

With that said, maybe hardtopte72 should do some DIY on the new to be out 2018 Camry V6 since all of the DIY are such excellent quality >:D
 

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A most thorough and detailed post. What do you do for a living? I'm a little confused. Why did you make mention of the battery positive cable removal? I know you always need to lift the negative terminal when working on alternators because the alternator is always "hot" if the battery is left in the electrical circuit. The old "three unit control" (voltage regulator) used on the six volt systems had a reverse current relay that prevented the battery from discharging to ground.If I remember from my A&P training, the alternator doesn't have a path to ground because of the diode bridge. No, I never put a wrench on a real airplane so the flying public was never endangered. The alternators I was around were considerably larger than a car alternator. Our generators (alternators) had sixty ton rotors and it took a bit of doing to remove the rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A most thorough and detailed post. What do you do for a living? I'm a little confused. Why did you make mention of the battery positive cable removal? I know you always need to lift the negative terminal when working on alternators because the alternator is always "hot" if the battery is left in the electrical circuit. The old "three unit control" (voltage regulator) used on the six volt systems had a reverse current relay that prevented the battery from discharging to ground.If I remember from my A&P training, the alternator doesn't have a path to ground because of the diode bridge. No, I never put a wrench on a real airplane so the flying public was never endangered. The alternators I was around were considerably larger than a car alternator. Our generators (alternators) had sixty ton rotors and it took a bit of doing to remove the rotors.
The entire battery needs to be removed to allow for property removal of the lower intake duct.

For safety, only the negative battery terminal needs to be removed. I did that and it burned me hence this note I mentioned:

Note: I originally only removed the negative terminal. This bit me later when repositioning the lower air intake duct.
 

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Very similar steps for our 07 ES350, except I didn't have to remove any bumper pieces in step 7. Done this twice. The lower alt bolt is a PIA, but everything else wasn't too bad.

I'm waiting for you to do a water pump how-to. : ) Coming up on 200K on the OEM water pump and want to replace it before it goes kaput.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Very similar steps for our 07 ES350, except I didn't have to remove any bumper pieces in step 7. Done this twice. The lower alt bolt is a PIA, but everything else wasn't too bad.

I'm waiting for you to do a water pump how-to. : ) Coming up on 200K on the OEM water pump and want to replace it before it goes kaput.
Not looking forward to that!
 

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Very good write up and pictures, I pretty much do most of what you removed except I don't take the bumper off, you can pop out the Toyota emblem to get to the hood latch bolts easy.
Also good to use an OEM Toyota reman alternator like you did, will save you from doing the job again in a few months, aftermarket alternators usually do not last.
 

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I started this project yesterday. It took me much more than 3 hours and I haven't even finished yet. :crying:

I'm also replacing radiator hoses, thermostat and coolant so did an engine block drain as well.

A couple of questions Hardtop:

1)I've got everything done except the back, bottom bolt on the alternator removed however the upper mount bushing nut is stuck in there good. I pried on in with several pry bars and it won't budget. I'm just chewing up the hex part. Any suggestions? I put some penetrating oil on it to sit overnight and hopefully that will work and I can pry it out. Debating whether I need to get something in there to hammer it out.

2) You said you got almost two gallons of coolant out. I probably only got out a little over 7 qts, maybe 7.5 and I opened the block drains on front and back and jacked up the rear. How did you get out so much?
 

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Great article, but this work is a bit excessive.
Just changed mine out and bumper removal and other jazz wasn't even necessary. Just removed the passenger side radiator top mount, pushed the radiator forward and had enough room to get it done right there. Super easy job for it being the 2GR-FE's limited space. Yes, it was all a tight fit, but I figured it all out.
I did have to reference one article on how to remove that wire mount underneath the alternator's rear lower mount. A sharpened screwdriver did the trick.

Pics on the way!

-TiM
 

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Just removed the passenger side radiator top mount, pushed the radiator forward and had enough room to get it done right there.-TiM
I'm not sure what you mean. What vehicle? I followed these steps and replaced mine this weekend and I can't imagine doing this another way. You didn't remove the radiator fans?
 

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I started this project yesterday. It took me much more than 3 hours and I haven't even finished yet. :crying:

I'm also replacing radiator hoses, thermostat and coolant so did an engine block drain as well.

A couple of questions Hardtop:

1)I've got everything done except the back, bottom bolt on the alternator removed however the upper mount bushing nut is stuck in there good. I pried on in with several pry bars and it won't budget. I'm just chewing up the hex part. Any suggestions? I put some penetrating oil on it to sit overnight and hopefully that will work and I can pry it out. Debating whether I need to get something in there to hammer it out.

2) You said you got almost two gallons of coolant out. I probably only got out a little over 7 qts, maybe 7.5 and I opened the block drains on front and back and jacked up the rear. How did you get out so much?
Update: On point 1) above I finally got it loose. I had to get a hammer and chisel. I put penetrating oil on it the night before so maybe that helped.
 
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