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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone. Finally did the front brakes on my 2009 Camry with 121K miles on OEM pads. I still had a good 5-10K left in them, but they were beginning to squeak and annoy the crap out of me. This procedure is the same for all 2007-2011 Camry and should be the same for 7th Generation (2012+) and very similar to 2002-2006 Gen 5 Camry and 2004-2009 Solara. Additionally this procedure will apply nearly identically for any Toyota that uses a similar caliper with hex head slides (Avalon, Highlander, etc.)

Disclaimer: Myself or Toyotanation are not responsible for any damage or injuries you may face when following this DIY. Automotive repair should be performed by qualified technicians. This DIY is for informational purposes. Use this DIY at your own risk.

Tools and Supplies needed:

Air Compressor (if using impact gun)
Impact gun
Long 1/2 Inch Drive Ratchet or Breaker Bar(if not using impact and compressor)
1/2 Inch Drive Torque Wrench (needs to read to at least 100ft lbs)
3/8 Inch Drive Ratchet (or wrenches)
1/2 Inch Drive 21mm impact socket
3/8 Drive 12mm socket (or whatever size is needed for your M8 x 1.25 bolts)
3/8 Inch Drive 14mm socket
3/8 Inch Drive 17mm socket (shallow well)
17mm open end or combination wrench with relatively thin open end head (to hold caliper slide head if stuck)
2 M8 x 1.25 Bolts (for rotor removal)
Thin flathead screwdriver
C-Clamp or caliper Compressing Tool
Wirebrush (tooth brush style)
Jack
Jack Stands
New Brake Pads
New Rotors, Machined Rotors, or Old Unmachined Rotors
Slide grease (i.e. SilGlyde)
Brake Contact Point Lube (i.e Sta-Lube Moly Grease)
Anti-seize compound or ultra expensive Toyota Brake Lube
Brake Parts Cleaner
Rags
Gloves
Drain pan

Some of the supplies pictured:



For a full list of brake pad part numbers based on specific models, see the Maintenace Sticky here: http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/104-5th-6th-generation-2002-2006-2007-2011/686945-official-5th-6th-gen-maintenance-thread-all-you-ever-wanted-know.html

Note: If your car is extremely rusty, someone used the incorrect grease previously, or you just want to ensure no issues, it is recommended to replace the Lower Caliper Slide Pin Bushings. These can swell and cause slide pin binding or the pin to not reinstall into the caliper bracket. Part number for the bushing is 47769-50010 and you need two.


Let us begin

1. Park the car on and level surface, chock the rear wheel, and set the parking brake. Jack up the car and place it on jack stands. Jack the car up at the nub of the front subframe and lower the car onto jack stands placed on either the pinch weld or frame rails (if you do not have an air compressor and impact gun, loosen all the lug nuts first using your 21mm socket and long 1/2 inch drive ratchet or breaker bar before jacking up the car). Raise the vehicle hood and remove the brake fluid reservoir cap. Sit the cap on the reservoir opening to keep out dirt.



2. Remove the wheel by removing all 5 lug nuts using your 21mm socket and impact gun. Set the wheel to the side.




3. Remove the caliper from the caliper mounting bracket. Using your 3/8 drive ratchet, 17mm wrench and 14mm socket remove the two 14mm bolts securing the caliper to the caliper mounting bracket/caliper slides.

Note: Sometimes these bolts can simply be loosened and sometimes they require you to hold the slide head with a wrench. You need a thin 17mm wrench or improvise with pliers or vise grips to fit between the caliper and bracket.



4. Hang the caliper on the strut (this is much better than letting it hang by its brake line and keeps it out of the way). Attaching to a bungee cord is a good idea but I never do that.




5. Remove the brake pads and caliper mounting bracket. Remove the 2 pad springs by starting on one side and pulling out the spring from the pad. Remove the brake pads from the caliper then using your shallow well 17mm socket and 3/8 inch drive ratchet remove the two 17mm bolts that secure the caliper bracket to the backing plate. These are usually very tight. I recommend a shallow socket here as a deep socket will barely fit if the wheel is straight. Remove the bracket with the brake pads and set it to the side.



6. Remove your rotor. From the factory these rotors have bolt holes predrilled to aid in rotor removal. If doing a pad slap skip this step. If using a new or machined rotor, using your 2 M8 x 1.25 bolts alternately tighten the bolt in the predrilled holes until the rotor is free from the hub.





7. Clean the caliper mounting bracket. Using your wire brush clean all the rust/brake dust/crud from the caliper bracket hardware. The benefit of this simple step is huge.



8. Clean and lubricate the caliper slides. Remove the slides from the caliper mounting bracket. Clean off the old crud with your rag and apply a thin layer of slide grease to the slides.

Caution: Using too much slide grease can cause the slides to bind in the caliper bracket and cause issues. Use only enough grease to cover the metal surface with minimal excess.

Note: The slide with the rubber grommet ALWAYS goes on the bottom side of the bracket (towards the ground when mounted). On the Gen 6 Camry these slides are not interchangeable anyway.

Note: If replacing the slide pin bushing, now is the best time.





9. Transfer the OEM hardware to the new pads. Make sure you are working on a clean surface. You do not want any grease or crud on your new brake pad friction surface. If reusing OEM hardware clean the hardware off and then remove it from the old pad. If your new pads came with cheap hardware like my Akebonos remove it from the new pads as well. Apply a small dab of anti-seize or Toyota brake lube to the new pad backing and install the hardware onto the new brake pads. Not too much here or it will glob out everywhere when you clip on the hardware. If you had OEM pads remove the wear sensor and transfer it to the new pads by using a flathead to release it from the old pad at the pad backing.

Note: I am a firm believer in the superiority of OEM hardware. I highly recommend you either reuse the OEM 2 piece hardware or buy new OEM hardware.

Note: Watch out as if too hasty in removal the wear sensor may go flying.

Note: Make sure you install the hardware correctly. It will be two pieces with one that will clip onto the other like pictured.

















 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
10. Lube the pad to caliper contact surface. Apply a very light layer of anti-seize compound or brake contact point grease to the pad where it contacts the caliper mounting bracket hardware. There is also a very small and hardly noticeable raised section on the pad side that is toward the rear of the caliper. I highlighted them below as "wear areas". Lightly lube the pictured pad contact surfaces. Again very thin layer here.

Note: Failure to apply the contact lube may result in pad binding or brake noise.

Note: I recently found that I was getting some rotational noise from my front brakes. Initially I thought it was the backing plate rubbing. After taking everything apart I found the problem. There is a small raised section on the pad contact that needs to be lubed. I have updated the DIY to reflect this change.






11. Clean hub and apply a layer of anti-seize to the hub circle. This will make the next brake job and wheel removal so much easier. A very light layer is all that is necessary.



12. Using your brake cleaner clean off all the brake parts not greased to include the brake rotor, caliper, and the backing plate. Install the brake rotor on the hub and secure it with one lug nut all the way finger tight.



13. Install the caliper mounting bracket. Install the caliper mounting bracket on the backing plate. Make sure to move it carefully around the rotor as to not gouge it. Tighten the two 17mm bolts. Tighten them tight very tight but do not break them. These are bolts you do not want coming loose.

Torque spec for the two 17mm caliper bracket mounting bolts is 79 ft lbs.



14. Install the pads on the caliper mounting bracket. Position the pads in the caliper mounting bracket while making sure they are oriented correctly. Install the outboard pad as shown by positioning it inside the caliper at an angle then seating it straight in.

Caution: The brake pad wear sensor must always face up when the pads are mounted in the caliper bracket.

Caution: Be careful not to get any grease on the rotor face.





15. Compress the caliper piston. Using your c-clamp or caliper tool and an old brake pad, compress the caliper piston to the fully seated position in the caliper. This is done with by compressing the old pad against the piston.






16. Install the caliper on the caliper mounting bracket. Install the two pad springs into their respective holes and while holding the pads together, simultaneously slide the caliper over the pads and on the caliper bracket. Tighten the two 14mm caliper/slide bolts while holding the slide head with your 17mm or equivalent wrench. Also be careful tightening these bolts down. Too tight and they can break. Just snug them down or torque them to spec.

Torque spec for the two 14mm caliper mounting bolts is 25 ft lbs.

Note: My Akebono ProACT ACT1212 Pads did not come with new pad springs like OEM Toyota pads do.






17. Install the wheel. Remove the lug nut from the rotor, install the wheel, snug the lug nuts down hand tight and lower the car.



18. Using your 1/2 inch drive torque wrench and 21mm socket, torque the wheels to 76 lb. ft. Reinstall the brake fluid reservoir cap and lower the hood.



19. Now get inside the car and without starting pump the brakes several times to move fluid in the calipers. Start the car and do this one more time.

Warning: Failure to depress the brake pedal prior to moving the vehicle may result in damage or injury.



20. Break in the new pads. I do this by accelerating slowly up to 50MPH and then slowly braking to a complete stop. I do this 3-4 times total. After that go for a normal drive and verify there is no squealing, rattling, grinding, dragging or any other unusual noises.

Enjoy your sense of accomplishment, peace of mind, and money savings.
 

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Registered
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1,264 Posts
Another great post Hardtop. I usually bleed out the fluid instead of pressing it back in. You probably had good fluid already. I just like to get some fresh fluid.

Do you torque the caliper bolts (76 lbf?) and slider bolts (26 lbf?) or just tighten? On my Ody looks like mechanic did not and the bottom one fell off. I got new bolts and torqued them. That one loose bolt was causing stickiness and warped the rotor. So I started to torque on all our cars now.
 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
Joined
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Another great post Hardtop. I usually bleed out the fluid instead of pressing it back in. You probably had good fluid already. I just like to get some fresh fluid.

Do you torque the caliper bolts (76 lbf?) and slider bolts (26 lbf?) or just tighten? On my Ody looks like mechanic did not and the bottom one fell off. I got new bolts and torqued them. That one loose bolt was causing stickiness and warped the rotor. So I started to torque on all our cars now.
I have torque hands lol.

I don't use a torque wrench but I triple check my bolts and my tightening would be right around those specs.
 

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2004 Camry LE
Cars
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713 Posts
My Akebono brake pads came with a little packet of grease. Is it anti-seize or is it a pin lubricant?
 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
My Akebono brake pads came with a little packet of grease. Is it anti-seize or is it a pin lubricant?
It's moly lube for pad backing and contact points for the pad to caliper.
 

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09 Camry SE V6
09 Camry SE V6
Joined
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126 Posts
Started working on my brakes today too, needed new rotors so i am changing everything, one thing i was concerned was my car only has 82k and when i was attempting to pull slide pins out and clean, one of them moved freely while the other took a little bit of force to push in and pull out... is that normal? this is factory still too and this is its first brake job.
 

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イリジウム
Joined
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11,765 Posts
No, one of the pin is seizing in the bore probably because of the rubber bushing. All pins should move freely with little pressure. IMO these bushings are more problems than they're worth, but they're a cheaper design than metal spring clips to prevent caliper rattle noises. Hardtop's two visible pads look evenly worn, so these weren't a problem on his.

You can either replace them and then use a light coat of silicone grease on the pins, or you can leave them out. I usually don't like to make "modifications", these bushings are supposed to keep the calipers quiet, but in most cases you shouldn't have a problem without them. Don't use petroleum based greases on rubber parts.

It's a good time to change out the dust boot while you're at it.

If you clean the bores with brake parts cleaner make sure everything is dry, or the petroleum based cleaner will degrade the rubber and cause the pins to seize again, if you do use the bushings.

$3.01 + shipping, verify your application:
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=3387558&cc=1442326
 

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09 Camry SE V6
09 Camry SE V6
Joined
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126 Posts
No, one of the pin is seizing in the bore probably because of the rubber bushing. All pins should move freely with little pressure. IMO these bushings are more problems than they're worth, but they're a cheaper design than metal spring clips to prevent caliper rattle noises. Hardtop's two visible pads look evenly worn, so these weren't a problem on his.

You can either replace them and then use a light coat of silicone grease on the pins, or you can leave them out. I usually don't like to make "modifications", these bushings are supposed to keep the calipers quiet, but in most cases you shouldn't have a problem without them. Don't use petroleum based greases on rubber parts.

It's a good time to change out the dust boot while you're at it.

If you clean the bores with brake parts cleaner make sure everything is dry, or the petroleum based cleaner will degrade the rubber and cause the pins to seize again, if you do use the bushings.

$3.01 + shipping, verify your application:
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=3387558&cc=1442326
Okay, I had already put everything back together, what I did was just clean around the bushing and the slide pins, then used moly grease instead of what the factory used. is that okay? if not i can still take back apart and redo it. Also, should I clean the inside where the slide pin sits? I think I might just buy all four new boots cause like I said, on pin moved fairly easy while the other felt like it was stuck. Thanks
 

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nice write up! its too complicated for me but i wanted to see if i can diy as the last shop i took to get my brakes had me waiting several hours before even moving the car,

i had new brake pads on all 4 . problem is that it makes weird noise , kind of grinding noise . I have NOT taken my car back because now i dont trust them and will NEVER go back to them bad experience .

any suggestions as to what my grinding noise is? all new pads 07 camry
 

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09 Camry SE V6
09 Camry SE V6
Joined
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126 Posts
nice write up! its too complicated for me but i wanted to see if i can diy as the last shop i took to get my brakes had me waiting several hours before even moving the car,

i had new brake pads on all 4 . problem is that it makes weird noise , kind of grinding noise . I have NOT taken my car back because now i dont trust them and will NEVER go back to them bad experience .

any suggestions as to what my grinding noise is? all new pads 07 camry
Grinding noise? Is it during braking or while driving? If its during braking, it could be the type of padas they used, if it is not then I would take the wheels of and inspect for rubbing etc.. changing out brakes are fairly easy but if first time doing it, just take your time
 

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イリジウム
Joined
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11,765 Posts
I don't know what kind of moly grease that is. If it's Molykote 77, then it should be ok with rubber. However, these moly greases are meant for pad to caliper/bracket contact points. I personally use Permatex Ceramic Extreme or you can use the Silglyde Hardtop mentioned.

http://www.permatex.com/products-2/product-categories/lubricants/specialty-lubricants-brakes/permatex-ceramic-extreme-brake-parts-lubricant-detail
http://www.agscompany.com/lubricants/automotive/154

You can use a screwdriver wrapped with paper towel to remove old silicone brake lube and in many cases that's sufficient. But if you remove the bracket, then might as well do a complete cleaning.

Consider leaving the rubber pin bushings off. If the ever calipers rattle, then put the new ones back on.


Okay, I had already put everything back together, what I did was just clean around the bushing and the slide pins, then used moly grease instead of what the factory used. is that okay? if not i can still take back apart and redo it. Also, should I clean the inside where the slide pin sits? I think I might just buy all four new boots cause like I said, on pin moved fairly easy while the other felt like it was stuck. Thanks
 

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イリジウム
Joined
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11,765 Posts
If it's the brake pads, then swap them out for Akebono ProAct ceramics like Hardtop used. Check rockauto and Amazon for prices. Use the 5% discount code: http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/103-3rd-4th-generation-1992-1996-1997-2001/360084-rockauto-discount-code-10.html#post6728946

Otherwise recheck the installation as well as the anchor pin and caliper piston movement. If brakes make noise after a shop worked on it, then they suck. Period.


nice write up! its too complicated for me but i wanted to see if i can diy as the last shop i took to get my brakes had me waiting several hours before even moving the car,

i had new brake pads on all 4 . problem is that it makes weird noise , kind of grinding noise . I have NOT taken my car back because now i dont trust them and will NEVER go back to them bad experience .

any suggestions as to what my grinding noise is? all new pads 07 camry
 

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09 Camry SE V6
09 Camry SE V6
Joined
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126 Posts
If it's the brake pads, then swap them out for Akebono ProAct ceramics like Hardtop used. Check rockauto and Amazon for prices. Use the 5% discount code: http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/103-3rd-4th-generation-1992-1996-1997-2001/360084-rockauto-discount-code-10.html#post6728946

Otherwise recheck the installation as well as the anchor pin and caliper piston movement. If brakes make noise after a shop worked on it, then they suck. Period.
Well since I still have my rear calipers off, I went ahead and regreased though by fully cleaning out the slide pin and the area it goes in, and went to Napa and bought some Sil-glyde and it made it better. Not gonna grab that CRC brake grease anymore.. but it didnt make it much better, im sure it still needs to warm up and then hopefully it works great... ill monitor it but the rubber bushings still looked good so I just cleaned it.. Thanks for the help
 

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its during the morning, when i first start it up let it warm up and once its ready the noise is not much
the Akebono ProAct ceramics has different edition but amazon says it wont work with my 07 camry and
i was thinking gong to costco for my next time. what you guys think? do the Akebono ProAct ceramics are they oem quality or greater? how much does toyota charge for their set of brake pads .


Grinding noise? Is it during braking or while driving? If its during braking, it could be the type of padas they used, if it is not then I would take the wheels of and inspect for rubbing etc.. changing out brakes are fairly easy but if first time doing it, just take your time
If it's the brake pads, then swap them out for Akebono ProAct ceramics like Hardtop used. Check rockauto and Amazon for prices. Use the 5% discount code: http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/103-3rd-4th-generation-1992-1996-1997-2001/360084-rockauto-discount-code-10.html#post6728946

Otherwise recheck the installation as well as the anchor pin and caliper piston movement. If brakes make noise after a shop worked on it, then they suck. Period.
 

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2009 Camry SE I4 MGM
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1,451 Posts
Nice DIY write up Hardtop. Awesome as always !!!!!!
 

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04 & 09 I4 XLE
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2004 Front pads won't go in

I tried to do my 2004 Camry's front pads today. I removed the caliper and hung it with a rope. Was able to remove the old pads but can't fit in the new pads. I did not remove the caliper support bracket. When I did the rear last year, did not have this problem. No such problem either with the other cars I've done (early years Nissan and Subaru). Does the support bracket have to come off in order to put in new pads for 2004?
 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Updated Step 10 with new info on lubrication points.
 

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If I put the wear indicators on the bottom instead of the top, is that a big deal? If not, then I'll wait until winter tire change over to rotate the pads.
 
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