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I decided not to wait and mess with it myself. I got a dozen recommendations for a local transmission shop.I scheduled an appointment with them. They wanted $123.xx.... dealer wanted $268.

The shop put the camry on the lift, inspected the underside. pulled the plug, pulled the straw. drained the used ATF WS. Then they pulled the pan off and inspected everything. My car is a Gen 6.5 (2011) that is suppose to have a sealed transmission.... Well it has a removable drain pan.

They put it back on, filled it. Ran it to temperature. checked the straw and plug.Level is correct.

I had 114,500 miles on the original ATF WS. I had them drain the fluid in a separate container that was clean and the original fluid still "Looked" good, it wasn't really dirty.

But after driving the car around a few days, You can tell the new fluid is thicker (The fluid with 144,000 miles on it did break down because the shifting felt a little stiffer/ smoother and not "loose" maybe that is not the right term)

But it feels like new and there is a difference.
you mean, the transmission is dead? did you have to replace it? My is 100k and never changed tranny oil. Thinking about getting it done.

Idea
1
2

With these 2 vdo and combine with this forum, i think it can be done successfully and fast

scotty kilmer said something about if tranny doesn't change at all the friction in the oil keeps the shift from stiffing. I am not even sure if that applies to your case.

Look here
 

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Scottydilmer is a babbling fool. I wouldn't waste time watching his videos.

Maintain your transmission. Whether complete fluid exchange, or a pan drain/refill regimen, is for you to decide.

I would also change the ATF filter every 100k and clean/replace the magnets and upgrade to 4 magnets.
 

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The 2 topics I wanted to shed light on....

1. Drain plug - I seen myself having to hammer the bit into the drain plug to make sure it got enough grip. There was a layer of rust I had to fight through and I was worried about stripping. I used a new plastic OEM washer but was so scared to crack the pan or strip bolt that I didnt tighten it enough and upon first test drive, i seen a leak at the bolt. Tightened it further and fixed leak. Understanding how easy it is to strip, I'll be sure to continue to be careful when removing and adding.

2. I did drain and fill because @ 213k miles with dark fluid, I hear the flush process can be a little aggressive on an older higher mileage fluid/tranny. The flush process only concerning because there is a risk area when most of the fluid is out. You could keep it running too long and I dont know what that will equate to with older/higher mileage tranny. I did that process on my tahoe with 120k miles but it idnt have a drain plug. We are fortunate to have one. I dont see why we dont play it safe...
 

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2015 4 Runner SR5
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you mean, the transmission is dead? did you have to replace it? My is 100k and never changed tranny oil. Thinking about getting it done.
Welcome to the site JP. Absolutely, with no equivocation, get your tranny fluid changed. However you opt to do it, do it. A simple drain and fill once will not get it all, but you could do it about three times and call it good (drain/fill, drive around the block, repeat). Or do the home flush method that is posted up here in a DIY. Or pay to have a shop do it. Whatever, just do it. 100k is just fine.
 

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Scottydilmer is a babbling fool. I wouldn't waste time watching his videos.

Maintain your transmission. Whether complete fluid exchange, or a pan drain/refill regimen, is for you to decide.

I would also change the ATF filter every 100k and clean/replace the magnets and upgrade to 4 magnets.
Thanks why the upgrade
found it
Part Number: 3539408010
2 names, what are they for ? I do not know
Automatic Transmission Oil Pan Magnet (Rear)
Automatic Transmission Oil Pan Magnet
 

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2. I did drain and fill because @ 213k miles with dark fluid, I hear the flush process can be a little aggressive on an older higher mileage fluid/tranny. The flush process only concerning because there is a risk area when most of the fluid is out. You could keep it running too long and I dont know what that will equate to with older/higher mileage tranny. I did that process on my tahoe with 120k miles but it idnt have a drain plug. We are fortunate to have one. I dont see why we dont play it safe...
The "flush" method described here and what most do is a flush in name only, as no added pressure is put to the system (no machine is used). All the fluid is changed, which doesn't increase any risk to the trans, really. When leaving old fluid in at least two things, and maybe more, might reduce slip if that was to occur: 1) the old fluid may have "grit" in it which is helping do the job of the friction pads that are probably eroded, 2) passages may have some gunk in them and the all new fluid has all that new detergent additive which does its job and cleans, which could dislodge then lodge some crud into a solenoid passageway causing some lockup issues.

When you just drain and fill once you get about 1/3 new fluid in there. I don't get the point as you aren't doing anything of substantive value to the transmission. The old fluid is the majority left in there and so you still don't get the protection you need, which absolutely guarantees the tranny will fail. Sometime. If the tranny is shot and the new fluid makes it obvious (and that is what is happening - the new fluid is not breaking anything, it is just un-masking a problem you already have) then you have early warning of an issue. Sucks to have a slipping tranny, but that was going to show up anyway, you just had no idea when.

As I said, I don't get the point of a single drain and fill, but that is what some people feel safer with I guess. It's psychology at that point, not maintenance. You may get some new symptons with all new fluid. You may get them with 1/3 new fluid. You will get them at some point having never changed the fluid, and every mile you add increases the risk that ANY new fluid you add in can lead to more issues faster (as the lubrication factor is dimishing faster as time goes by). The fluid has a job to do, and breaks down and can no longer do that job after some point. For the auto manufcaturer, 100k miles is great as they prefer you buy a new car by then, so they can dismiss the fluid in general as it should last about 100k without changing.
 

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I am scared now. I may have to pay to get it done.
It is a very easy thing to do yourself. The hardest part is if it is a sealed tranny then you have to remove that inner tube on the drain plug to drain it cold (not hard to do, just another step) - plus you have to pump the fluid into the fill plug instead of dumping it down the dipstick tube: a slight more PITA and needs a cheap fluid pump. It takes maybe 30 minutes or so if you do a full on "flush", which, after the initial drain and refill, requires you to pump out 1 quart at a time via the return hose. You don't muck around with the drain plug again, just the refill plug. Easier to get a ship to do it, you just pay well over $100 for labor and would want to verify they did more than a simple drain/refill one time.
 

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I had a drain and fill done at my local Toyota dealer done on my 2011 Avalon Limited at 53,000 miles. They used 4 quarts of World Standard ATF and it cost me $113.31. The transmission actually shifted much smoother when cold than it did before the service. No regrets.
 

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It is a very easy thing to do yourself. The hardest part is if it is a sealed tranny then you have to remove that inner tube on the drain plug to drain it cold (not hard to do, just another step) - plus you have to pump the fluid into the fill plug instead of dumping it down the dipstick tube: a slight more PITA and needs a cheap fluid pump. It takes maybe 30 minutes or so if you do a full on "flush", which, after the initial drain and refill, requires you to pump out 1 quart at a time via the return hose. You don't muck around with the drain plug again, just the refill plug. Easier to get a ship to do it, you just pay well over $100 for labor and would want to verify they did more than a simple drain/refill one time.
Need like a detail vdo please. Last month i got alternator and starter done by my self on corolla. But this camry 2011 is different.
Question

filter i should change right? Steps are a bit some what hard because of that engine mount. I want to learn but dont want to ruin the car.

Also I dont want to drive my car on borrowed time.

Found this, i think this is easy to understand gold mine
 

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Success, Thank you all for help. You can do it too.



1 big mistake, when I cleaned the oil and changed the filter for tranny. I forgot to put it back so I had to take it out and install 2 magnets back again. A lot happened because of no experience at all.



Problems with 10mm oil pan that lower arm and ball joint and then have to use jack to lift it tranny high enough and then go under take the 10mm out. I use the super rapid Daytona low profile from harbor freight tools $178, they got this black Friday going on now. It is a really good jack



Got this from another topic very helpful, the difficult is the 19mm is so tight. I used very short 19mm socket and 3/8. I don’t have short 19mm with ½ socket. Yes I took the wheel out.



“Remove the nuts securing the driver’s side transmission mount. Using your screwdriver pop out the hole covers for the lower mount studs. Then using your ratchet, 17mm socket, and extension remove the 3 1x19mm 2x17mm nuts from the transmission mount. 2 are under the stud covers and one is exposed under the mount. Finally using your ratchet and 19mm socket, remove the upper nut securing the transmission mount to the transmission.”

Spec below for the torque

17mm nuts and bolts to 94 ft-lbs. ball joint

19mm nuts 76 ft. lbs.



Start work flow

1 change tranny filter

2 clean the oil pan with 2 magnet u760e camry 2011 100k miles

3 put new atf oil into the pan

3 remove the return hose use tube 5/16” ID x 7/16” OD Clear PVC/Vinyl, bought it from homedepot about $7 (this part is tricky have to remove the airflow that is block my hand to get to the return hose and that clamp is tricky to get the tube out it is not easy)

4 new tube to the bucket from the return hose

5 start the car, shift gear p to d, pumping out

6 while pumping out, keep pouring the oil atf to the fill hole ( I spilled a lot oil the funnel keep slipping off the fill hole, they designed this not to DIY at all)

7 keep at it until the color is pink

8 put everything back and the I used ScanGauge II to monitor the temperature 104 F to 114 F

9 See the dripping then it is done, end up using about 12 atf fluid from Toyota 00289-ATFWS $7.55 per bottle, order online save some money from crowntoyota, local pick up.



Thoughts, the temp is very fast raising, I did it 3 times to get that dripping result. When turning off the engine, the fluid will push out a lot so, another mistake there.



Imagine using techstream, I have it connect USB connection after starting the car and it is so slow and then click data list another loading again. Only cable firmware version 2.0.1 will work for my car. 1.4.1, wont work, I bought mine $58 amazon



I find it is easy

XGauge command below

txd 07E12182 rxf 046105820000 rxd 2808 mth 00090005FFD8



I spent 10 hours to complete the job. I also did it on Toyota 2006 which is much easier with the dip stick. Next project pcv perhaps, I saw a picture from another topic. It is really hard.


I borrowed this picture from the original owner big thanks. I am thinking may be next time, I will use the supply hose to put the fluid in may be easier any thoughts?
 

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As I said, I don't get the point of a single drain and fill, but that is what some people feel safer with I guess. It's psychology at that point, not maintenance. You may get some new symptons with all new fluid. You may get them with 1/3 new fluid. You will get them at some point having never changed the fluid, and every mile you add increases the risk that
I drain that 1/3 every 30,000km and at 255,000km the fluid is all clean... so the drain and refill must do something useful, possibly it is maintaining the transmission.
 

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Update today driving 2 hours ATF temp reached to 210 F. What is the ideal temp when driving 2 hours? Everything seems well. Please help answer beginner question.
 
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