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2005 Corolla CE
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well my brother in law finally hit 110K and since I was already doing major maintenance, I decided to replace the PCV valve. This procedure is for the 2010-2011 Camry 2ARFE but should apply pretty equally for the most part to 1ARFE and 2ARFE equipped vehicles. This DIY will cover removal of the intake manifold, fuel rail, and PCV Valve, but will help those looking to replace the cowl or wiper components. Including breaks and the time to take pictures, this DIY took me about 5-6 hours to complete. Expect the novice DIYer to take a solid day. This job was pretty difficult the first time around. I would not recommend to do this unless the vehicle has at least 100K miles.

Disclaimer: Myself or Toyotanation are not responsible for any damage or injury that may result from use of the DIY. Automotive maintenance and repair should be performed by qualified technicians. This DIY is for informational purposes, use it at your own risk.

Tools and Parts needed:
Jack
Jack Stands
3/8 inch Drive Ratchet
3/8 inch Drive 10mm Socket
3/8 inch Drive 12mm Socket
3/8 inch Drive 14mm Socket
3/8 inch Drive Extensions (3” and 6")
10mm Box End or Combination Wrench (Ratcheting preferred)
12mm Box End or Combination Wrench (Ratcheting preferred)
19mm Open End or Combination Wrench
Small/Pocket Flat Head Screwdriver
Stubby Phillips Head Screwdriver
Normal Sized Flat Head Screwdriver
Needle Nose Pliers (Angled type and straight type)
Hose pliers
Brake Parts Cleaner
Throttle Body Cleaner (If cleaning throttle body)
Coolant (If removing throttle body)
Gloves
Rags or Towels



Part numbers:

Throttle Body Gasket - 22271-0V010
Intake Manifold Gasket - 17171-0V010
Fuel Injector Upper O-Ring - 90301-07037
Fuel Injector Lower O-ring/Vibration Cap - 23291-28020

For Air Filter, PCV Valve, and Wiper Blades, see the Maintenance Thread Below:

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/104-5th-6th-generation-2002-2006-2007-2011/686945-official-5th-6th-gen-maintenance-thread-all-you-ever-wanted-know.html

Warning: A hot engine can cause burns. Be sure the vehicle is cool before attempting this repair

Caution: Prior to removing the intake manifold, Toyota advises to close the ACIS flaps. To do this, you are supposed to connect the ACIS control harness to battery power and close the flaps. I found this was impossible to do in the space provided. Additionally, since the ACIS flaps should reopen automatically based on temperatures, there is no way to accomplish this using Techstream. Instead I closed the flaps manually using the procedure below.

Note: I did not remove the throttle body completely when doing this repair. If removing the throttle body, make sure to have engine coolant available.

Let's begin!

1. Park your car on a level surface, shut the engine off, and open the hood.



2. Remove the engine cover. Lift up the engine cover by grasping it pretty much anywhere and pulling straight up. Place the engine cover to the side.



3. Remove the wiper arms. Using your 3/8 inch drive and 14mm socket, remove the plastic nut securing the wiper arms to the cowl. With your hand near the nut end of the arm, push downward to release the arm from the wiper control unit. Set the arms aside.





4. Remove the upper wiper cowl. Using your stubby Phillips head screwdriver, remove the small clip located at each end of the wiper cowl. Separate the wiper cowl from the windshield seal extension and remove the wiper cowl.

Note: If the outer end of the clip spins or the Phillips head center keeps spinning, hold the outer portion with your hands and unscrew the center WITHOUT pressing downward.



5. Remove the wiper control unit. Depress the center and release the electrical connector securing the wiper control unit to the lower cowl. Using your small flathead screwdriver, separate the wire holder on the lower coil and remove the harness from the lower cowl. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, remove the 4 bolts securing the wiper control unit to the lower cowl. Set the unit aside.



6. Remove the lower cowl assembly. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, remove the four 10mm bolts securing the lower cowl assembly. Then switch the 14mm socket, and remove the four 14mm nuts securing the lower cowl to the strut tower. Lift the cowl from the car and tilt it slightly downwards to access the remaining harness clip. Using your flathead screwdriver, depress the sides of the holder one at a time and remove it from the cowl. Set the cowl aside.




7. Undo the upper airbox, from the lower airbox. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, loosen the two captive screws securing the upper airbox to the lower airbox. Lift the driver side of the upper airbox up and pull outward to disengage the rear claws.



8. Remove the breather hose from the intake manifold. Using your angled or straight needle nose pliers, depress the ears of the hose clamp and slide the clamp down the hose. Then either pull the hose off with your hand, or use your hose pliers to carefully twist and pull it off.



9. Remove the MAF sensor and EVAP VSV sensor connectors. Depress the center release and carefully pull the connector of the sensor and VSV.



10. Remove the EVAP VSV from the intake hose. Carefully grab the VSV and rock it up and out of the intake hose holes.



11. Remove the intake hose assembly. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket or 10mm wrench, loosen the set screw for the intake hose clamp until the clamp is loose enough to easily remove the hose. Remove the intake hose assembly with upper airbox.

 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
12. Undo the fuel rail line quick disconnect. Remove the fuel tank cap. Locate the fuel rail line under the brake master cylinder. Using your finger or a small flat head screwdriver, open the latch to the fuel rail line quick disconnect cover. Open the cover and pull downward the remove the cover. Depress the two yellow tabs and carefully pull off the fuel rail line quick disconnect. Pull the fuel rail line from the holder on the throttle body.

Note: Some fuel may leak out after disconnecting the quick disconnect.



13. Remove the throttle body from the intake manifold. Remove the throttle body connector by depressing the center release where "Push" is printed and pull up to remove the connector. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, remove the four 10mm bolts securing the throttle body to the intake manifold. Lift the throttle body off the manifold and set it aside in towards the driver side.



14. Remove the fuel injector connectors. Depress the center release on each fuel injector and remove the fuel injector connectors.



15. Remove the wiring harness from the intake manifold. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, remove the three 10mm bolts securing the wiring harness brackets to the intake manifold. Then depress the center release and remove the following harness connections:

EVAP VSV (Optional but not required)
ACIS Connector (Center of manifold on firewall side)
Downstream Oxygen Sensor (Underneath from exhaust pipe)
Crankshaft Position Sensor (Underneath on passenger side/front of engine)
Power Steering Sensor (Underneath on power steering pump)

Once the connections are removed, using your straight or angled needle nose pliers, remove the harness from the harness holder brackets by depressing both sides of the holder and removing the harness from the holder bracket. Remove the harness and set it over the valve cover and out of the way.

Note: In the first picture, arrows are connectors and dotted boxes are holder brackets.

Note: It was very difficult to photograph this step with the intake manifold installed.

 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
16. Remove the fuel rail. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 12mm socket, remove the two bolts securing the fuel to the cylinder head. Lift the fuel rail up and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the two fuel rail spacers from the cylinder head.

Caution: Failure to secure the fuel rail spacers will result in not being able to correctly reinstall the fuel rail.



17. Remove the VSV, PCV, and Brake Booster hoses from the passenger side of the intake manifold. Using your needle nose pliers, hose pliers, or fingers, either pull the hoses straight off or twist and pull the hoses off. Set the brake booster and PCV hoses aside. Set the VSV itself with hoses attached aside.

Caution: The PCV hose does have a clamp that may need to be slid up the hose.

Note: The VSV hoses were STUCK on the manifold. It took a lot of effort to pull them off of the manifold.

Note: Make note of the orientation of the VSV hoses when removing.



18. Remove the intake vacuum hose. Using your angled or straight needle nose pliers, depress the ears of the hose clamp and slide the clamp down the hose. Then either pull the hose off with your hand, or use your hose pliers to carefully twist and pull it off.



19. Remove the ACIS control harness brackets. Locate the ACIS control harness bracket on the rear of the intake manifold (firewall side) towards the driver side. Using your 10mm wrench, remove the one 10mm bolt securing the bracket to the intake manifold. Then using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket and/or 10mm wrench, remove the two 10mm bolts securing the second bracket to the intake manifold, near the ACIS actuator.

Note: I could not photograph this step with this intake manifold installed.



20. Unbolt the intake manifold. Locate the six bolts securing the intake manifold. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 12mm socket, remove the six bolts securing the intake manifold to the cylinder head. Carefully pull the intake manifold off the cylinder head a few inches.

Caution: Failure to carefully remove the intake manifold may result in damage to the ACIS flaps. If the flaps are damaged, the only fix is to replace the entire intake manifold.

Note: My flaps were open all the way on intake manifold removal.

Note: Now is a good time to check and verify anything that could hold the intake manifold in is disconnected/unplugged.



21. Remove the ACIS control actuator connector. Depress the center release and remove the ACIS control actuator connector.



22. Remove the intake manifold. Unbolt the brake booster line from the firewall. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, remove the one nut securing the brake booster line to the firewall. Pull the line out and up to make room for intake manifold removal. Then carefully maneuver the intake manifold out of the engine bay.

Caution: Failure to carefully remove the intake manifold may result in damage to the ACIS flaps. If the flaps are damaged, the only fix is to replace the entire intake manifold.



23. Close the ACIS actuator flaps. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 12mm socket, remove the two bolts securing the ACIS actuator to the intake manifold. Once removed, manually close the ACIS flaps. Reinstall the ACIS actuator onto the intake manifold.



24. Clean the intake manifold and throttle body (optional). Using throttle body cleaner, liberally spray and clean the throttle body. Using throttle body cleaner, liberally spray and clean the intake manifold ports. Using a rag or towel, wipe as much carbon as you can from the intake manifold. Then using brake parts cleaner, liberally spray the intake manifold ports to dry off any throttle cleaner residue. Using your rag or towels, wipe dry and areas.

Caution: The seal around the ACIS flaps are rubber. Make sure to dry the area as soon as possible to avoid damaging the seals.



25. Clean the cylinder head. Using throttle cleaner on a rag or towel, clean the intake side ports of the cylinder head of all carbon residue. Then using brake parts cleaner on a rag, clean the mating surface of the cylinder head to remove any residue.



26. Remove the PCV valve. Using your angled or straight needle nose pliers, depress the ears of the PCV valve hose clamp and slide the clamp down the hose. Then either pull the hose off with your hand, or use your hose pliers to carefully twist and pull it off. Using your 19mm wrench, remove the PCV valve from the ventilation block. Then using your 19mm wrench, install the new PCV valve in the ventilation block. Reinstall the PCV valve hose.

 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
27. Install the new intake manifold gasket onto the intake manifold.

28. Install a new throttle body gasket into the intake manifold. Remove the old gasket and install the new gasket in the same orientation. (mesh towards the radiator).

Caution: Failure to install the throttle body gasket correctly, may result in a throttle that won't open and/or damage to the throttle body gasket.



29. Install new injector o-rings onto the fuel rail (optional). Clean the fuel injectors of outside dirt and debris. Remove the injectors and replace the o-rings.

30. Reinstall the intake manifold. Place the intake manifold back into position on the cylinder head. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 12mm socket, reinstall the intake manifold in the following order:



Torque spec for the manifold bolts is: 15 lb ft.

31. Reinstall the brake booster line onto the firewall. Place the line back into position on the firewall stud. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, tighten the 10mm nut.

32. Reinstall the ACIS control valve actuator connector. Place the connector into position and push it into place.

33. Reinstall the ACIS control harness brackets. Using your 10mm wrench, install the one 10mm bolt securing the ACIS control harness bracket on the rear of the intake manifold (firewall side) towards the driver side.. Then using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket and/or 10mm wrench, tighten the two 10mm bolts securing the second bracket to the intake manifold, near the ACIS actuator.

Note: See photo for orientation of the bracket near the ACIS control actuator.



34. Reinstall the intake manifold vacuum hoses. Reinstall the intake vacuum hose near the throttle body. Reinstall the PCV valve hose, brake booster hose, and VSV hoses near the passenger side.



35. Reinstall the fuel rail. Clean the fuel injectors of outside dirt and debris. Place the two fuel rail spacers into position. Carefully place the fuel injectors and fuel rail into position and gently seat them down. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 12mm socket, tighten the two fuel rail bolts. Reinstall the fuel tank cap.

Note: The fuel rail spacers are different from top to bottom. Install the spacers with the longer extension downward into the cylinder head.

Torque spec for the fuel rail bolts is: 15 lb ft.



36. Reinstall the wiring harness onto the intake manifold. Reinstall all wiring harness holders into their respective brackets. Connect the wiring harness connectors to the following locations:

EVAP VSV (If removed)
ACIS Connector (Center of manifold on firewall side)
Downstream Oxygen Sensor (Underneath from exhaust pipe)
Crankshaft Position Sensor (Underneath on passenger side/front of engine)
Power Steering Sensor (Underneath on power steering pump)

Then using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, tighten the three 10mm bolts securing the wiring harness brackets to the intake manifold.

Torque spec for the wiring harness bracket bolts is: 7 lb ft.



37. Reinstall the throttle body. Place the throttle body into position on the intake manifold. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, tighten the four 10mm bolts securing the throttle body to the intake manifold. Reinstall the throttle body electrical connector.

I forgot to get the torque spec. I used good and tight.



38. Reinstall the fuel rail quick disconnect onto the fuel line. Press the fuel rail quick disconnect onto the fuel line until you hear a distinct click. Attempt to pull off the hose to verify installation. Then reinstall the fuel rail quick disconnect cover. Coming from the bottom, place the cover into position and push upward. Close the door to the cover to secure it.

Warning: Failure to adequately seat the fuel rail quick disconnect may result in a fuel leak. This could result in a fire and serious injury, death, or property damage.



39. Reinstall the intake hose assembly and upper airbox. Place the intake hose into position over the throttle body. Slip the hose over the throttle body and push downward to seat it. Tighten the hose clamp until it is tight.

40. Reinstall the EVAP VSV. Line the extensions of the EVAP VSV up with the holes in the intake hose and push downward.



41. Reinstall the EVAP VSV and MAF sensor connectors.



42. Reinstall the breather hose. Push the hose onto the valve cover. Using your straight or angled need nose pliers, lower the clamp back down to secure the hose.



43. Secure the upper airbox to the lower airbox. Line the upper airbox claw with the lower airbox slots and push inward. Then push down at the front and using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, tighten the two captive 10mm screws that secure the upper airbox to the lower airbox.

Note: Now would be a good time to replace the engine air filter.

44. Reinstall the lower cowl assembly. Place the lower cowl into position over the strut mount studs. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, install the 4 bolts securing the cowl to the car. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 14mm socket, install the four 14mm strut mount nuts securing the lower cowl. Install the wiper control harness into the holder on the lower cowl.

Torque Spec for the Strut Mount Nuts is 63 ft. lbs.



45. Reinstall the wiper control unit. Place the wiper control unit into position and using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 10mm socket, reinstall the four 10mm bolts securing the wiper control unit to the lower cowl. Reinstall the wiper control unit harness into the lower cowl holder and close the holder. Install the wiper control unit connector onto the wiper control unit.



46. Install the upper cowl cover. Place the upper cowl cover into position. Install the two outer cover clips and press them into position. Connect the flexible outer cowl seal onto the upper cowl.



47. Install the windshield wiper arms and wipers. Reinstall the arms into the correct position over the upper cowl. Using your 3/8 inch drive ratchet and 14mm socket, install the two plastic nuts securing the wiper arms to the upper cowl.



48. Reinstall the engine cover. Make sure all of the engine cover holders are on the cover itself. Press the cover into position and press down to seat the holders over their posts.

49. Start the engine and check for any rough running, leaks, or unusual noises.

Note: Your check engine light may be illuminated. If it is, remove the negative battery terminal for one minute. If you have a scanner and the code is a ACIS valve stuck open/closed code, disregard it. If it is something, diagnose the issue.

50. Go for a test drive and verify everything operates as designed.

Enjoy your work! This job would be very expensive to have someone else do. You can save hundreds of dollars doing it yourself.
 

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Honda-Tech White Ops
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1,581 Posts
Big props for a great write up with great pics!



I will say, trying to remove stuck hoses is a pain.. I use a pick set to slide around the inner hose and un-lodge it. This reduces damage to hoses that are stuck on and wont give.
 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Big props for a great write up with great pics!



I will say, trying to remove stuck hoses is a pain.. I use a pick set to slide around the inner hose and un-lodge it. This reduces damage to hoses that are stuck on and wont give.
Thanks for the kind words. Total up time for this DIY was approximately 8 hours. I just went back and made some minor improvements.

As for the hoses, being in Florida I am a little spoiled. Stuff like rust and extremely stuck/corroded stuff is not normal for me. I would hate to do exhaust work on this car.
 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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Discussion Starter #8
All of this work for just the PCV valve?

What so the 4 cylinder is getting as hard as the V6 to work on now...
Most modern PCV valves are ventilation blocks like this engine. The 2ZR is the same way and I am sure most other new engines will follow suit.

I think if it had electric power steering like the Gen 7, it may have been doable without manifold removal.

Besides this one thing, the 2ARFE is still a very simple engine to work on and is nothing compared to a V6.

Most of these same steps would have applied to a 2AZFE Gen 6 as well.
 

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Honda-Tech White Ops
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1,581 Posts
Im in florida also.. but the heat just makes some hses quite difficult to remove sometimes..



But a pick set from Harbor Freight is about 5.00, or was is Advenced Auto i bought it from..?


either way, sliding a pick around to work it loose helps alot.
 

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06 Sienna, 10 Camry
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842 Posts
A few things:

1. I'm all for preventative maintenance, and I like to replace PCVs on a schedule because they're cheap, but screw that! We're going to see how long mine can last now!

2. Wow, is that rust on your firewall? On a Florida car at most 7 years old? Yikes!.

3. Very nice write up, thank you, I'm sure I'll need it some day unfortunately.
 

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Super Moderator
2005 Corolla CE
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14,605 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
A few things:

1. I'm all for preventative maintenance, and I like to replace PCVs on a schedule because they're cheap, but screw that! We're going to see how long mine can last now!

2. Wow, is that rust on your firewall? On a Florida car at most 7 years old? Yikes!.

3. Very nice write up, thank you, I'm sure I'll need it some day unfortunately.
1. It's a decent amount of work, but at $20 over 100k miles, not really concerning.

2. This car is from Delaware. I'm storing it while he's away and decided to do the maintenance. The firewall spots are leaves/dirt. Nearly all rust was on fasteners vs. general metal rust.

3. Thanks!
 

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1995 LE
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All of this work for just the PCV valve?

What so the 4 cylinder is getting as hard as the V6 to work on now...
My thoughts exactly! All this to just replace the PVC valves:surprise:!!! What the heck was Toyota thinking? I wonder how much this would cost at the dealership for those who can't do their own repairs.
Is the V6 more complicated than this?
hardtopte72, your thread is excellent but it has pointed out some glaring problems with serviceability.
W95c
 

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2005 Corolla CE
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Discussion Starter #13
My thoughts exactly! All this to just replace the PVC valves:surprise:!!! What the heck was Toyota thinking? I wonder how much this would cost at the dealership for those who can't do their own repairs.
Is the V6 more complicated than this?
hardtopte72, your thread is excellent but it has pointed out some glaring problems with serviceability.
W95c
The V6 is located on top and is easier to service.
 

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10 Camry 16 Highland
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My thoughts exactly! All this to just replace the PVC valves:surprise:!!! What the heck was Toyota thinking? I wonder how much this would cost at the dealership for those who can't do their own repairs.
Is the V6 more complicated than this?
hardtopte72, your thread is excellent but it has pointed out some glaring problems with serviceability.
W95c
Agree. I am not doing this until it is dead. I am used to a PCV valve replacement taking less than 5 minutes, and some don't even require any tools!
 

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Hi, thanks for the detailed and clear post and information.
I followed your steps one by one, broke one of the four throttle body’s bolts. Everything else is fine. Two issues I’m facing now:
-High idle at 1300rpm
-Brakes are not working, emergency brakes are fine though
Any ideas of the cause and fix?
 
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