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Part Numbers

Do you happen to have the part number for the shoes from Part Source? I've only been able to locate the shoes from the dealership at a ridiculous price. (everyone sells the hardware kit but no shoes!) I'm working on a 1997 Camry, your DIY is great, thanks for taking the time to post it!
 

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2002 Camry
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Discussion Starter #22
The shoes were Wagner #PAB528. On sale for $34.78 + taxes. Reg. price = $38.65 + taxes. I just walked in to Parts Source and asked them what they had for shoes. These were middle of the line. Neither the cheapest nor the most expensive.
 

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Thanks

Thanks for the info. I have called two PartSource locations and neither said they carried shoes for camry's and didn't have it in their system. Thanks for the parts number...hopefully this leads them to find them!
 

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Many Thanks !

dz63, I want to thank you for posting this thread on the rear drum brake job !

I am a somewhat clueful backyard mechanic, but going by the Haynes manual I have for my wife's 2002 Camry , there was no indication that the emergency cable needed to be loosened in order to retract the spring on the cable where it attaches to the secondary shoe/e-brake contraption.

I have something of value (I hope) to add. The passenger side rear drum was not as easily removed as the driver's side, even after I turned the "star wheel adjuster".

I looked at the drum, and there are two (2) shallow drilled and threaded indentations. I found the right size bolts, threaded the bolts in, and the drum popped right off.

Again, thanks for a great DYI, dz63 :thumbsup:
 

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Justin '93 Camry Owner
5 Spd 93 Camry Delux
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95 Posts
Nice tutorial, how does the parking brake end up so bad like that in the first place? Mine is pretty bad I have to pull it almost all the way back, and when my dad was tightening a lug nut with the rear wheel off the ground he accidentally got the wheel free from the brake for a split second.... When me and my dad checked all 4 brakes today the rear drums came right off and it is very clean with no severe rust. Note it's a 93 Camry... If it's really that difficult to fix the parking brake I think I'm gonna leave it up to the Mechanics... Neat tutorial though!
 

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2002 Camry
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450 Posts
Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
AAF - Very good question. My parking brake cable is now loose again. I can pull it up about 8-10 clicks before it engages - exactly the same symptoms before I changed the rear shoes.

Note that I was able to free up the stuck cable by alternating pulling on the cable at the rear drum and then pulling up the parking brake lever...but over the last few months it drifted back to the same problem. I don't know why this is happening.

This is on my list of problems to solve. If I figure it out, I will post back. If you figure it out, please let me know.

Edit: Upon further investigation, I found that both parking brake cables were binding. The cables were getting stuck when pulled up and not returning to the "home" position.

After replacing both cables, I cut the old ones apart to see where the cables were getting hung up and found that it was at the point where the cable passes through the “white metal” part that is bolted to drum backing plate. I suspect that the “white metal” part corroded inside and this eventually caused the cable to seize. After replacing both brake cables, the "loose" parking brake cable phenomenon disappeared.
 

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Justin '93 Camry Owner
5 Spd 93 Camry Delux
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95 Posts
I doubt I'll figure it out before you as I won't be taking it to the shop to get a new clutch and such until July. When I get my car fixed up before I go to college the parking brake is on the list of things I want done with my car while at the shop, but I'll ask what he had to do to correctly fix it when I get it fixed. Best of luck with finding out how to fix it though.
 

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96 Toyota Camry
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dz63,

I looked at the drum, and there are two (2) shallow drilled and threaded indentations. I found the right size bolts, threaded the bolts in, and the drum popped right off.

Again, thanks for a great DYI, dz63 :thumbsup:
Exactly! Before reading your post, I wondered about those 2 threaded indentations - as I was having trouble getting a rear drum off, and the Haynes and Chilton manuals were no help - and wrong at times!. And sure enough, I too just discovered that threading the correct size (?) bolts in them pops a stubborn rear drum right off my 96 Camry! (Given the star adjuster isn't forcing the brake shoes out too tight).
 

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92 Camry 5S-FE
92 Camry 5S-FE
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485 Posts
Thinking about tackling this project in the near future, as my shoes are most likely original at 171k. As old as the last comment is on here, I thought I'd throw something out. I know some cars have self-adjusting rear brakes and if you brake hard while in reverse the star wheel will tighten up the drums. Does the camry do this? That would help the people with loose e-brakes.
 

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mixed bag 'o vehicles
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Thinking about tackling this project in the near future, as my shoes are most likely original at 171k. As old as the last comment is on here, I thought I'd throw something out. I know some cars have self-adjusting rear brakes and if you brake hard while in reverse the star wheel will tighten up the drums. Does the camry do this? That would help the people with loose e-brakes.

yes, the drums are self-adjusting, but they adjust by pulling up on the parking brake handle. at least on mine, after i installed new drums and shoes, when i pulled up on the parking brake (about 20 times) each time if i listened closely, i could hear the adjusters clicking about twice (IIRC) per pull until the handle felt tight to pull.
 

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Thanks so much for this great post. I stripped my back brakes only to find it was actualy the adjuster at the brake lever which had worked it's way lose. A tip for those with central locking button on the centre console. Once the console is loose as per the above method, placing your hand underneath the console work the switch up and out. You can then easily reach the electrical plug to release the wiring harness to the switch. Without doing this I could not remove the console completely and access the adjuster easily. I think, when I sent it in to the shop the last time, they adjusted it with a socket through the top and that is what caused it to loosen as the adjusment nut and lock nut cannot be properly locked unless you remove the console.
 

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Mission Accomplished

I just want to tell you guys in here that I just finished replacing rear drum brakes on my 95 Camry. I am disabled and can't bend or squat so I had to do this job sitting on the ground by the rear wheels. Thanks to you guys, and the excellent photos of the process, I was able to complete the task in one day.

I know you experienced guys are probably going "HOLY SMOKES" all day just for the rear brakes! But given my limitations, I actually completed the job in about 5 hours. Had it not been for the photos and directions/instructions, I would have had to pay someone else which I did about 6 months ago.

I thank you guys a whole bunch and appreciate the forum you have here. I have a couple other tasks to perform on the Camry so I am sure I will be back in a few days seeking advice. The biggest job I have coming up is trying to figure out why the steering wheel is a half round out of sync with the front wheels and how to correct it. I was told it was a two or three day job so I am a bit anxious to begin that job.

What do you good folks in here think? The car was hit on the right front in a hit and run in Atlanta a couple years ago and the previous owner didn't have the steering wheel aligned when he had the damage to the front end repaired. So, do you guys think it is going to take me a couple days to accomplish this task? I was handy with tools and still enjoy the feel of good wrenches and ratchets in my hands but since I can't bend, squat or lift, what are my chances do you guys think I have in doing this job by myself?
 

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2002 Camry
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450 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
I just want to tell you guys in here that I just finished replacing rear drum brakes on my 95 Camry. I am disabled and can't bend or squat so I had to do this job sitting on the ground by the rear wheels. Thanks to you guys, and the excellent photos of the process, I was able to complete the task in one day.

I know you experienced guys are probably going "HOLY SMOKES" all day just for the rear brakes! But given my limitations, I actually completed the job in about 5 hours. Had it not been for the photos and directions/instructions, I would have had to pay someone else which I did about 6 months ago.

I thank you guys a whole bunch and appreciate the forum you have here. I have a couple other tasks to perform on the Camry so I am sure I will be back in a few days seeking advice. The biggest job I have coming up is trying to figure out why the steering wheel is a half round out of sync with the front wheels and how to correct it. I was told it was a two or three day job so I am a bit anxious to begin that job.

What do you good folks in here think? The car was hit on the right front in a hit and run in Atlanta a couple years ago and the previous owner didn't have the steering wheel aligned when he had the damage to the front end repaired. So, do you guys think it is going to take me a couple days to accomplish this task? I was handy with tools and still enjoy the feel of good wrenches and ratchets in my hands but since I can't bend, squat or lift, what are my chances do you guys think I have in doing this job by myself?
Glad the procedure helped! No idea about the steering wheel alignment. Sorry, can't help you with that one.
 

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First time poster here...

So I followed the Haynes manual instructions for the brake shoe replacement procedure, which more or less mirrors the process documented here (minus the opening of the center console), and I have a question.

Now that the new brake shoes are in place, I'm having to press the brake pedal down much further than I did before I changed them. Is this normal or to be expected? My fear is that they are not adjusting to the proper setting and thus my new brake shoes are not making contact with the drum.

The adjuster was close to all the way in when I put the drums back on, and I did NOT get the drums resurfaced (not sure if that affects anything).

Any insight you guys can provide would be much appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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2002 Camry
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Discussion Starter #37
First time poster here...

So I followed the Haynes manual instructions for the brake shoe replacement procedure, which more or less mirrors the process documented here (minus the opening of the center console), and I have a question.

Now that the new brake shoes are in place, I'm having to press the brake pedal down much further than I did before I changed them. Is this normal or to be expected? My fear is that they are not adjusting to the proper setting and thus my new brake shoes are not making contact with the drum.

The adjuster was close to all the way in when I put the drums back on, and I did NOT get the drums resurfaced (not sure if that affects anything).

Any insight you guys can provide would be much appreciated.

Thanks!
There are a couple reasons for a "low" brake pedal. There is either air in the system or excessive movement between the surface of the brake shoe and the drum. In your case, I suspect that the excessive movement is the problem. It is likely due to a lack of proper adjustment of the shoes. A seized star-wheel adjuster screw may be the culprit.

If you did not thoroughly clean the adjusters and wire brush the threads, when you had it apart, then I recommend that you take the adjusters out and thoroughly clean them. Then apply a light coating of high temperature brake lube to the adjuster threads and shaft before buttoning everything back up. You can get this lubricant in a small tube at any auto parts supply store. Here is one for example.

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Permatex-20353-Ultra-Caliper-Nozzle/dp/B000HBM85C/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1335827872&sr=1-1[/ame]

After everything the drums are back on, adjust the shoes outward using the star adjuster wheel as described in the above procedure, until there is a just a slight amount of resistance when the drum is rotated. A bit of trial and error is involved. Alternatively, slowly pull up the parking brake lever all of the way, repeatedly, until you hear no more audible "clicks" each time the parking brake lever is pulled up. If the adjusters are clean and lubricated, and you listen carefully, you will hear them click when the brake lever is pulled upward.

Good Luck. Let us know if this works.
 

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There are a couple reasons for a "low" brake pedal. There is either air in the system or excessive movement between the surface of the brake shoe and the drum. In your case, I suspect that the excessive movement is the problem. It is likely due to a lack of proper adjustment of the shoes. A seized star-wheel adjuster screw may be the culprit.

If you did not thoroughly clean the adjusters and wire brush the threads, when you had it apart, then I recommend that you take the adjusters out and thoroughly clean them. Then apply a light coating of high temperature brake lube to the adjuster threads and shaft before buttoning everything back up. You can get this lubricant in a small tube at any auto parts supply store. Here is one for example.

http://www.amazon.com/Permatex-20353-Ultra-Caliper-Nozzle/dp/B000HBM85C/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1335827872&sr=1-1

After everything the drums are back on, adjust the shoes outward using the star adjuster wheel as described in the above procedure, until there is a just a slight amount of resistance when the drum is rotated. A bit of trial and error is involved. Alternatively, slowly pull up the parking brake lever all of the way, repeatedly, until you hear no more audible "clicks" each time the parking brake lever is pulled up. If the adjusters are clean and lubricated, and you listen carefully, you will hear them click when the brake lever is pulled upward.

Good Luck. Let us know if this works.
Thanks for the feedback! Yeah between those alternatives I would definitely guess it's too much space between the shoes and the drum, since I bled my brake system about 2 weeks ago with no problems.

I'll try out your suggestions tomorrow most likely. One thing to add... in addition to a loose brake pedal, my parking brake now moves all the way up and has no effect at all. I know that they are positioned correctly inside of the shoe, because I had to take the shoes apart again and re-do it because they were not correct the first time. I was hoping to not have to mess with the parking brake, but I guess I will have to adjust from the center compartment now??
 

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2002 Camry
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Discussion Starter #39
One thing to add...my parking brake now moves all the way up and has no effect at all.
I had a similar problem with mine too. There was no resistance when I pulled up the parking brake lever and my rear brake shoes were not engaging the drums to prevent the car from rolling.

It took me a while to figure out what the probem was. What I eventually discovered was that my parking break cables were were seizing when I pulled up the lever and not returning to the "home" position. You can determine this by watching for cable movement (or should I say "lack" of cable movement) when you release the parking brake lever.

I temporarily "unstuck" it by pulling the cable back and forth, alternating between a pair of vice grips at the back of the car, and the brake lever inside the car. But, this only lasted a few months before they completely seized again.

I eventually replaced both cables. Not an easy job - all of the cable clamp bolts under the vehicle were rusted solid. I had to grind many of the bolts and replace them. If you are interested, I posted a DIY procedure for the cable replacement at this link...

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/103-3rd-4th-generation-1992-1996-1997-2001/299108-diy-gen3-2-2l-parking-brake-cable-replacement-procedure.html

After replacing the cables, I cut the old ones apart to see where the cables were getting hung up and found that it was at the point where the cable passes through the “white metal” part that is bolted into backing plate. I suspect that the “white metal” part corroded inside and the corrosion eventually caused the cable to seize at this location. After I changed both parking brake cables, the problem diasppeared.

I am not sure if this is your problem, but it is pretty easy to check now that you know what to look for. Make sure to post back on the forum to let us know how you resolved this issue.
 

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Update: So I got my anti-seize compound all ready to go and was ready to go in and take apart the brakes again to lubricate the adjusters and to try to adjust the parking brake tension. When I pulled into home and put it in park, out of habit I pulled up in the parking brake, but this time I felt just the slightest resistance that I hadn't felt before, so I thought maybe the brakes were starting to adjust. I pulled the parking brake all the way up about 20-30 more times, hearing a soft clicking sound coming from the rear each time as the lever gradually gave me more and more resistance.

Now the pedal no longer feels loose and it brakes stronger than ever! Glad I didn't have to go back in there. Brake drums are an absolute pain the first time you do them, but now that I've taken them apart and put them back together a couple of times, I'm confident that I can maintenance them without too much trouble. Just takes one or two trial runs to see how everything works. Definitely worth the time spent to save the money!!
 
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