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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Alright. As some of you saw, I was hit and run last night snapping my wheel studs and sending my rim flying.

I got it towed back to my sisters apartment and it had been sitting there for the day. I came back at noon and had a warning sticker on my windshield AND a parking ticket. $100 ticket and the warning says your car must be removed within 24 hours or it will be towed. (at first I thought to myself...good luck towing it. haha)

So here's how to replace all five original OEM rusted-to-shit wheel studs in a parking lot.

DISCLAIMER: This is a very dangerous guide to be used in emergencies only. If you have the proper safety equipment, USE IT. If you don't know how to use it, back away from the car slowly... This is for people in a pinch without their tools and without time to waste and without money to have a mechanic do it. TN and myself are not responsible for any damage, injury or even death caused by your own stupidity.

Tools needed:

  • Jack
  • Jack Stands (or a rock if you're 2 hours from home...)
  • 10, 12, 17, 19 mm sockets
  • Socket wrench
  • Breaker bar for the 19 mm socket (since the torque wrench is 2 hours away...)
  • Hammer
  • Punch/chisel
  • Tin snips if your dust shield is bent and broken somehow
Time:
Took me about 4 hours in total.


  1. Jack the car up. Put it on jack stands. Chock the wheels. Set the parking brake. Or shove a rock under the frame if you don't have any of that stuff.
  2. Remove the tire and brakes and rotor.
  3. This is what my hub looked like:
  4. Grab your punch/chisel and start hammering them out.

    They're rusted in there. (If there's enough meat sticking out, you can hit it without the chisel to get it moving then use a chisel) Good luck. The first one was easy and filled with false hope. I got two off in about 25 minutes. The others took the rest of the hour to get off. It was kind of pathetic.
  5. When you get to this:

    You're good. Now. The only way I could get the new studs in without removing the dust shield was to turn the hub until the hole closest to the front of the car was in the spot it is pictured above. I know it sounds confusing, but you'll understand when you're doing it.
  6. Place the stud in and pull on the threads with your hand while you smack it with a hammer. It won't go in, but it will set it a little bit.
  7. If you're replacing all, you gotta move the hub so every stud is placed in that fashion. Also, when replacing all, after hammering and vibrating the hub all the way around, usually the first two or three are loose again. So re-hammer them in.
  8. Now you see a bunch of slack behind the studs that needs pulled in like this:

    You can't get enough of a swing to hammer it in so this is where I got creative. My tuner lugs are acorn shaped so stop after a while so I couldn't just pull the studs through using the lug nuts. But you could if you have the open type. Anyway. This is what I ended up doing to get enough room between the hub and the lugs to be able to pull them through using my tuner lugs:

    Call it ghetto if you wish, but I call it creative.
  9. I had two of my old lugs that I could find to use for this. The rest are gone. So I had to do it two at a time. Put one rotor on, then put another rotor BACKWARDS on top of that as shown above. Then install two lugs across from each other. Tighten the PISS out of them. This is where the breaker bar comes into play. I literally stood on top of it and jumped until they wouldn't go any further.
  10. Then move onto the next ones if you need more than one or two. If you want to check like I did to make sure it works, pull the rotors off. You'll see something like this:

    You can see the one is still out farther than the other. I hadn't gotten to that one yet. But I still had to re-do the ones I started with but I did notice my idea was at least working.
  11. Keep repeating the process until you see this:
  12. There ya go. You're done. Put it all back together.

    Next, replace your fender, if you're in the same situation as I am. You can see where the tire rubbed on the outside....:facepalm:
  13. Put your wheel back on. Start the lugs and lower the car. Use your breaker bar to tighten them and then use your foot to make sure they're extra tight. You don't want them loose...not now. If they're loose, you can rip your stud out...again.
  14. Put your tools away and drive off before the tow truck arrives to impound your car. Stop off at the beer store and grab a six pack (or get your sister to buy it for you, whatever works :spy: )
VERY IMPORTANT:

Re-check your lugs in a few days, couple miles, whatever. But DO IT.
 

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Turbo Snail
Cam A Roo
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5,300 Posts
I like how you used the old rotor to use as a giant spacer. Very creative :)

The only other thing you may want to mention is to make sure to put some anti-seize on the hub itself then slide the rotor over so the rotor will come off easier if you have to ever take it off again. I've seen rotors fused to hubs before and they take a torch to heat up the hub section of the rotor and a large hammer to smack it loose.

Good Write up though! :)
 

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pretty good field guide! since you went to the parts store to get new studs, should have picked up one open lug with a flat bottom =) also, greasing the studs splines helps a bit.
 

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2001 Camry XLE 1MZ-FE
2001 Camry XLE
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1,661 Posts
Good job. That's exactly how I did it when I changed out all my studs. The only thing I did different was I used a bigger hammer. :D

Still, my forearms were sore for a week.
 

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Toyota Collector
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12,016 Posts
Love the thread title! Clever idea to use the rotor like that as well. One tip I'd mention, is when putting in the new studs, try to align them so they match the old grooves in the hub. You can do this by rotating them slightly and feeling when the splines "drop in" to the grooves. This makes it easier to pull them through. You can also cinch the studs all the way when putting the wheel on, they will pull to the end of the travel by tightening the lug nuts as per usual.

Sorry to hear you were hit and run, that sucks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I like how you used the old rotor to use as a giant spacer. Very creative :)

The only other thing you may want to mention is to make sure to put some anti-seize on the hub itself then slide the rotor over so the rotor will come off easier if you have to ever take it off again. I've seen rotors fused to hubs before and they take a torch to heat up the hub section of the rotor and a large hammer to smack it loose.

Good Write up though! :)
Thanks! Yeah but I didn't have ANY cash when I got parts, so I couldn't get anything. I had to beg my sister to use her credit card over the internet to order the parts. Never heard of hubs sticking though....interesting.

pretty good field guide! since you went to the parts store to get new studs, should have picked up one open lug with a flat bottom =) also, greasing the studs splines helps a bit.
Yeah I realized that grease would help after I started, but didn't have that in my tool box.

Good job. That's exactly how I did it when I changed out all my studs. The only thing I did different was I used a bigger hammer. :D

Still, my forearms were sore for a week.
A bigger hammer would have been AWESOME. This one is from Ikea...and it's awful.

its amazing how much rust build up on that fender from 1 day. NICE DIY BTW
Most of that was old, but some was surface rust from this morning's storm.

Love the thread title! Clever idea to use the rotor like that as well. One tip I'd mention, is when putting in the new studs, try to align them so they match the old grooves in the hub. You can do this by rotating them slightly and feeling when the splines "drop in" to the grooves. This makes it easier to pull them through. You can also cinch the studs all the way when putting the wheel on, they will pull to the end of the travel by tightening the lug nuts as per usual.

Sorry to hear you were hit and run, that sucks.
I thought about trying to align them but didn't feel like wasting time. I probably would have pout the wheel back on and done it, but I didn't know if this would actually work to get the studs in! It was all my experiment hehehe

The rust isn't from the hit and run. Lol rust doesn't build up in a day.
There was some surface rust on the fender from the rain and the rotor was covered in rust just from the storm this morning.
 

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Turbo Snail
Cam A Roo
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5,300 Posts
the actual hub doesn't stick. the rotor slides over your studs and is pushed flush against the outside of the hub. over time it rusts and if you dont change your brakes for a really long time, it basically forms to the hub assembly making it a PITA to remove. Sometimes it doesn't but I've spent a good 20 minutes removing rusted rotors before with torches and a sledge hammer when all I should of had to do is at the most give it a light tap and pull it off
 

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What Toyota?
2008 Saab 9-3
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10,477 Posts
Adding this to the "I need to add this to the sticky" thread. :)
 

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What Toyota?
2008 Saab 9-3
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^ +1. Rust builds up on my rotors in less than 24 hours allllll the time.
 

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抵抗しても無駄だ
2002 Solara SLE V6
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9,091 Posts
hehe, that's pretty much how I replaced the broken wheel stud in front driver hub, just removed rotor and hammered the broken one out using a thick 1/2'' socket extension and home repair hammer ;)
then put the new one in. to push it all in I put the wheel on and torqued the lug nut to 100ft-lbs - it made it slide all the way in - then loosen the lug nut and torque it down to spec (77ft-lbs). no problems since :)
 

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Turbo Snail
Cam A Roo
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Hm.. didn't know rust builds up that fast. I'm guessing it's only the surface though and can easily be taken care of
Yeah its only surface rust. Body rust will take a little longer to appear. Surface body rust will show up almost immediately too though (if you have metal showing on the body)

Just drive normally.. the first time you tap your brakes its gone.

If it sits for a while though, it could lead to problems but as long as you keep them semi clean they arent even a worry.

There are some rotors available with a Zinc coating that dont do this, but most people just get the regular rotors and call it a day
 

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抵抗しても無駄だ
2002 Solara SLE V6
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9,091 Posts
Yeah its only surface rust. Body rust will take a little longer to appear. Surface body rust will show up almost immediately too though (if you have metal showing on the body)

Just drive normally.. the first time you tap your brakes its gone.

If it sits for a while though, it could lead to problems but as long as you keep them semi clean they arent even a worry.

There are some rotors available with a Zinc coating that dont do this, but most people just get the regular rotors and call it a day
yeah, rust builds up VERY quickly.

Had a chance to discover how all my car rotors looked like on first 02 solara when I was waiting for parts for like a month and then 00 solara when no one used it for over a week.

rotors looked like after car was sitting in parking lot for 6 months :facepalm:

though, the a few taps on brakes when moving in parking lot removes most of it, then 1 moderate braking down e.g. before the stop sign removes all of it.
 

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Very nice guide. :)
But by jumping on the breaker bar - isn't it a high risk of simply snapping the bolt off?
I mean, surly it depends on the lenght of the breaker bar and if you're 60kg or 130kg, but you know what i mean.

I've always been very carefull at least not to tighten it way too tight as i know a few who have smapped the bolts by overtightening them. And it wasn't very old and rusty bolts either. Not toyota bolts though... ^^
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Correct it can be dangerous, you can break the bolt or the tool. However I'm a pretty little dude so I'm not too worried about it :)
 
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