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CorollaCarClub.proboards.
93 & 98 Rolla
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This is a DIY on a full tune up job on a 8th gen non vvt-i Corolla .
More DIY http://rinconrolla98.blogspot.com


First thing you do is you carefully remove your spark plug wires , If there not numbered then number them or lay them in order as you take them off.


While your wires are off you can remove your PCV which is located above the ignition coil on the right side of your valve cover . To test the PCV you shake it and if it rattles freely then your PCV is ok if it doesn't rattle freely then it is clogged .


With a extension and a spark plug socket you remove all the spark plugs . Make sure before you remove your spark plugs it is free from dirt or liquids so that when the whole is open nothing drops in your cylinders .


My OEM plugs are the double sided spark plug . Denso #3194 . Some places you have to order them as in my case . Some people have their own preference . This is mine and what my corolla calls for .


Then I gap them at .44 each side .


Then I applied some anti seize because the corolla heads are aluminum and the spark plug is metal . If you don't apply this they will be a pain to get out . Once I applied the anti seize then I put the plugs back . Hand screw first so that you don't strip the threads .


The with the dielectric grease you put some inside the spark plug wires so that it will make it easier to pull the wires on and off with out breaking them .


Since this car doesn't have a distributor and coil packs . Inspect the coil packs lube as well with dielectric grease


In this case I have a aftermarket air filter . This air filter can be cleaned a reused . It's very simple you spray some degreaser all over the filter and let it sit for awhile . Then with a hose you spray from the inside out to remove all the dirt and grease . Do this as many times as needed . When you are done then you shake it dry or if you have a air hose you can use that to help it dry quicker . Set it out in the sun while you do other things and come back to it then spray the either transmission fluid or the oil spray that comes with it . Then you let it sit for awhile . This prevents it from rusting .


Next step is changing your oil . With your ratchet you remove your oil pan bolt . Make sure you have a oil pan underneath it . Let the oil drain for as long as you can , You want to make sure all your old oil is out . I do not use any oil cleaner additive but if you want to then you do what is best for you .


With that then you remove your oil filter make sure you have a oil pan underneath that cause oil will come over around the filter .



Then when you are ready to put your new filter back you wipe up the area where the old filter was then with your finger tip you apply a light coat of oil around the rubber ring of the oil filter . Then you hand tighten the filter . As the car runs it will tighten up more .

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Q2B2pa6pitU/THVxzFvpoBI/AAAAAAAABTM/haKJI9NKDn0/s320/diy+tune+025.jpg
Then when you are done you add your new oil , check all your fluids , put your air filter back . Start your engine let it run then shut it down and look for any leaks . Check your oil fluid again . Then you have completed your tune up .
 

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Gearhead
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I'd add checking the drain plug gasket. Depending on the material - plastic or aluminum/rubber, you might be able to reuse it one or two more times. If in doubt, replace it - they are pretty cheap.

Also, watch out and keep the anti-seize stuff off the last couple of threads on the plugs. Pretty easy to over do it and increase the potential for hotspots and predetonation from that extra anti-seize sticking into the combustion chamber. Also have to adjust your torque rating as well, assuming the base lubricant of the anti-seize is some sort of grease. Pretty easy to overtorque the plug, increasing the chance of stripping the threads off the head.
 

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Hi, thanks a lot for this post, very helpful. Currently I am looking for how to change the transmission oil in Toyota Corolla 1998 VE (Manual), I checked under the car and I could see only one plug which I believe is for draining the transmission oil. I could not find any fill plug. Can you please tell me of where to put the transmission fluid after draining out the dirty oil? I appreciate your help in advance.
Thanks.
Hadi
 

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Full Throttle
1993 Corolla SE Ltd
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6,774 Posts
Hi, thanks a lot for this post, very helpful. Currently I am looking for how to change the transmission oil in Toyota Corolla 1998 VE (Manual), I checked under the car and I could see only one plug which I believe is for draining the transmission oil. I could not find any fill plug. Can you please tell me of where to put the transmission fluid after draining out the dirty oil? I appreciate your help in advance.
Thanks.
Hadi
Welcome to the forums! This thread should come in handy for you (particularly post #10) -

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=245059
 

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hey everyone this is my first post on this forum. i apologize if i'm in the wrong thread but i've been searching for a DIY for a 2003 corolla coolant temp sensor. I have no idea where the sensor is located. i've tried searching the forums and on google but no luck. if there isnt any diys, would someone be able to just tell me where it is located? thanks to anyone with any information or help.
 

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2011 Hy AWD Limited
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where is the oil filter located at?
 

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Under the engine on the passenger front side about two feet in from the front bumper. The oil drain plug is on the bottom of the oil pan next to the oil filter there.
 

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NGK said:
NGK sparkplugs feature what is known as Trivalent plating. This silver or chrome colored finish on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. This coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs are installed at the factory dry, without the use of anti-seize. NGK tech support has received a number of tech calls from installers whom have over-tightened spark plugs because of the use of anti-seize. Anti-seize compound can act as a lubricant altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread breakage
(read: K-factor)

AFAIK, all modern spark plugs are, and have been, like this. This is why the threads are shiny. Whereas spark plug threads back in the day, are a dark grey color, and require anti-sieze. I have only used new spark plugs, and have never had a problem getting them out, whether it be short-life copper NGK's after 5k mi, or Bosch plugs after 40k mi. So I'm not sure why OP recommends the use of anti-sieze on the plug threads. I wouldn't do it.

Here is an example of a plug you would use anti-sieze on. This is for a Ford Model T.
 
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