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Well I guess my "Toyota Engineers Know What's Up" thread was a little bit of a premature celebration, as it didn't go 100% flawlessly, lol.

I was doing some other maintenance/repairs at the same time so I still hadn't started up the car when I posted that thread (I know, counting my eggs before they hatch). After finishing up everything else today, I set the car back on the ground, and went to start up the car. Turn the key, and I get nothing, not even a click. I check the battery voltage, read 13.1 volts, so I am fine there. I have lights, radio, door chime, etc. Next I check the alternator to make sure it's hooked up correctly, and it is. I'm getting frustrated at this point, but decide to check the fuses.

Well, stupid me, I know I should've disconnected the battery cables before I did anything, and admittedly I can be a little more careless on my own vehicles (when I'm not worried about breaking other peoples' stuff) so I didn't disconnect them. I know, dumb move on my part.

So at some point during the course of my repair, I guess I grounded out the positive wire for the alternator, and in doing this burned up the fuse. It must've been brief, because I didn't see/hear/feel a spark.

So the 120 amp fuse for the alternator is a PAL type fuse, and it is a bit of a PIA to remove. I'm a mechanic, so it wasn't very difficult for me, just time consuming. However if you were an average Joe who somehow made the same mistake, you'd almost certainly be going to a shop.

I had to remove the battery (yeah, NOW I disconnect it, lmao), remove the intake and air cleaner housing, disconnect the MAF, and then unbolt the fuse box. From there, I had to push in all the tabs on the side of the fuse box to separate it so I could gain access to the screws holding the fuse blades to the terminals themselves. Once in half, I had to fish my a socket past the mess of wires inside the box, and unscrew both terminals. Now I could remove the fuse, and swap it with the new one, and reassemble everything.

Also I was lucky that I have a big assortment of these pal type fuses on hand, as a lot of auto parts store do not stock these, and I know they'd take a day or two to get one from a dealership.

Anyways, it was a lot of extra work for a stupid mistake that I should know better not to have done. So learn from my mistake, and DISCONNECT YOUR BATTERY CABLES BEFORE YOU START ANYTHING!
 

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2004Toyota Camry V6
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If I remember correctly, the old generators used a three unit control(often referred to as the voltage regulator) that prevented dead shorts to ground. One thing about those mishaps, you will never do that again. A valuable lesson for me many years ago. Not going to do that again.
 

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short-throw dipstick
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Same here, I disconnect the battery nowadays after too many (2) sparkings doing timing belt jobs on 1MZs. Luckily I've not blown the fuse yet, hopefully never will.
 

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Well I guess my "Toyota Engineers Know What's Up" thread was a little bit of a premature celebration, as it didn't go 100% flawlessly, lol.

I was doing some other maintenance/repairs at the same time so I still hadn't started up the car when I posted that thread (I know, counting my eggs before they hatch). After finishing up everything else today, I set the car back on the ground, and went to start up the car. Turn the key, and I get nothing, not even a click. I check the battery voltage, read 13.1 volts, so I am fine there. I have lights, radio, door chime, etc. Next I check the alternator to make sure it's hooked up correctly, and it is. I'm getting frustrated at this point, but decide to check the fuses.

Well, stupid me, I know I should've disconnected the battery cables before I did anything, and admittedly I can be a little more careless on my own vehicles (when I'm not worried about breaking other peoples' stuff) so I didn't disconnect them. I know, dumb move on my part.

So at some point during the course of my repair, I guess I grounded out the positive wire for the alternator, and in doing this burned up the fuse. It must've been brief, because I didn't see/hear/feel a spark.

So the 120 amp fuse for the alternator is a PAL type fuse, and it is a bit of a PIA to remove. I'm a mechanic, so it wasn't very difficult for me, just time consuming. However if you were an average Joe who somehow made the same mistake, you'd almost certainly be going to a shop.

I had to remove the battery (yeah, NOW I disconnect it, lmao), remove the intake and air cleaner housing, disconnect the MAF, and then unbolt the fuse box. From there, I had to push in all the tabs on the side of the fuse box to separate it so I could gain access to the screws holding the fuse blades to the terminals themselves. Once in half, I had to fish my a socket past the mess of wires inside the box, and unscrew both terminals. Now I could remove the fuse, and swap it with the new one, and reassemble everything.

Also I was lucky that I have a big assortment of these pal type fuses on hand, as a lot of auto parts store do not stock these, and I know they'd take a day or two to get one from a dealership.

Anyways, it was a lot of extra work for a stupid mistake that I should know better not to have done. So learn from my mistake, and DISCONNECT YOUR BATTERY CABLES BEFORE YOU START ANYTHING!
Hello I did the same but I can’t take out the fuse box, any suggestion? Thanks
 

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I just posted about changing that same fuse block on my 07. Anyone have a video? I am trying to disassemble the fuse panel without getting frustrated and beating it with a hammer. Lol
 
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