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The check engine light in my 2000 echo went on a couple of months ago. I brought the car in to toyota a the code was p0171. And they verified the max air flow sensor and they said that is was within normal operation. But Since a couple of days now the car is having more problems stating and now and then the car stalles, not all the time. Anyone have any ideas ??????

Thanks.
 

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96 3MZ M/T
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P0171 System too Lean (Bank 1)

check your o2 sensor it might be reading wrong. also get new filters, and a bottle of injector cleaner. the cheaper are the air and fuel, also cleaning the injectors (should cost more than 30 if you do it your self. (also the only one you might not be able to change is the fuel or O2 if you dont have wrenches or a good place to work on your car.))
 

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did you replace the maf that could be your problem area its one or the other and the scantool would tell them if its was the o2
the code would be {bank1 sensor 1- too lean} so i would check the maf again
 

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I Promise This Is The Fix To This Problem

this exact code came on for me and it its a sensor that is dirty....all you need to do is buy 5 dollar electrical cleaner and spray it on the wire.....thats it! the sensor is in the maf, you do NOT have to replace the whole thing!!!!! i replaced my o2 sensor but it didnt help...and this turned the light off, it read the exact same code. i will try to find the link to the site i found that gives step by step pictures of how to clean it..and i will post it.
 

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This is actually a common problem with a lot of different cars. The MAF sensor has 1 or 2 very small heated wires in it. As the air goes by it the wires cool down, and as a result the resistance changes. The cars computer uses that resistance reading to determine how much fuel to put in. The most common problem is a little bit of dirt on that small heated wire. The dirt acts as an insulator and keeps the wire from cooling down. So basically the computer thinks theres less air going in and injects less fuel in. Kind of like having a small vacuum leak. Easiest way to fix it as alltucke said is to blast it with some electrical cleaner.
 

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Stalls and P0171

I have had some luck cleaning the MAF sensor and was able to clear the P0171 on my 2001.
The stalling problem could be caused by the PCV on the valve cover. If the valve is stuck the engine may stall or if it is just sticking intermittently it can cause a rough idle.
 

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What is the MAF and where is this website that was mentioned in this thread? Does MAF stand for Main Air Filter? Sounds too easy.
 

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When I witnessed the check engine light on my 2000 Echo, I looked under the hood and discovered a 1/2 inch hose was disconnected from the air filter area. In other words the hose actually goes back in the wall of the car behind the engine but the it was disconnecting from the air filter area of the car.

For several months I tried to put the hose back on with the existing clamp. It seemed to occur most often during hot weather and when I turned on the air conditioner. For several months I had to check this hose to make sure it didn't fall off because the check engine light will NOT come on immediately when this hose comes off. Recently, I used a non-standard hose clamp - the kind that screws on instead of the standard one that pinches on. Hopefully this won't cause more problems than I know what to deal with.

So far no problems outside of a blower motor relay switch that went bad. This relay is related in the Blower 2 socket of the electrical box under the hood.

Problems experienced and resolved so far:

1) Hose coming loose from air filter area and check engine light coming on
2) Blower 2 relay failure (symptom: only high fan speed works inside car)
3) Water pump replacement
Water pump failure symptoms: rattle and squeaks under hood, serpentine belt unraveled and car began to overheat (red radiator light above blue radiator light started blinking)
Resolution: Stopped driving the car but added water to get it home to minimize damage. The old water pump will continue pump water but the bearing seals will leak fluids on the serpentine belt and the belt that goes to the power steering pump.

Tips and Tricks: These are obviously non-standard tricks of the trade but in order to get the water pump out you have to remove the alternator.

To drain the radiator completely, loosed the plastic radiator drain plug on the bottom side of the radiator. A wrench was not required for this and it can be done my hand unless someone really cranked on it.

To remove the alterantor you must loosen the bolt below the alternator and remove the two nuts on the slide aduster above the alternator, give the belt some slack and remove the belt. After removing the belt, remove the bolt below the alternator. Remove all the wires on the alternator. Thee's two hex head bolts and two plastic covers that must be removed. I was able to salvage both plastic connectors and I recommend this. Unfortunately one of the plastic locking tabs broke on one of the plastic covers but I ended using a spray on, non-permanent glue to put it back on and hold it after I replaced the water pump. Wiggle the alternator forward and backward while pulling upward until the alternator comes off completely. After removing the alternator from the engine compartment, gently set it aside for reuse. Next begin remove the four hex head bolts on the water pump pullet. The pulley must be stabilized by sticking a screwdriver threw the holes of the pulley and using the side wall of the engine compartment to keep it from turning while loosening and removing the bolts from the pulley. Next, beging removing the two nuts and three bolts from the water pump. The next steps are definitely non-standard but it worked for me. I did not worry about damaging the old water pump because it was very obvious the bearings were bad and I had a new water pump ready for installation.

To remove the water pump, you must first remove the wires attached to the sidewall/wheel well. There's two thick bolts and a locking bracket that can be removed to move these wires out of the way. Next, begin removing the water pump. Try to work the water pump toward the front the vehicle. Don't give up! I almost did because it is a very difficult task to remove it. The trick was to angle the back of the waterpump towards the front of the engine compartment and gently wiggle it back and forth until it came out. When you are on the right track you will notice the back of the water pump will lift up and out of the engine compartment. Wallah! You got it! Go have a drink and relax because you are half way there.

I'm sure my next steps will bring a lot of controversey here but if you know of a better way to get the little booger of a water pump back in, let's hear it! I put the gasket on the engine first. Next, I used a wheel grinder to grind the front and back of the new water pump shaft (ouch) by about 1/64" on each end. The grinding wheel didn't touch the bearing seals or the water pump impeller blades so I believe this is a safe method to use. This allows the water pump to go in without damaging the water pump impeller blades or the new water pump gasket that was installed.

The rest is self explanatory - put all the nuts and bolts back on the water pump - stagger the tightening of the nuts and bolts of the water pump to ensure an even seal on the gasket. Put the water pump pulley back on using the same screwdriver and wrenches you used to get it off. Replace the wire on the sidewall (wheel well side). Out the alternator back on and wiggle it back and forth until the lower bolt can be inserted. Continue wiggling the alternator while screwing the lower bolt in. This can't be done by hand - it will become too tight and you will need the wrench to get it back on semi-tight. After you get the lower bolt on semi-tight you can put the upper adjustment slide, nut and lock back on. Put the serpentine belt back on - the belt only rubs against the water pump and completely encircles the air conditioner pulley, the fly wheel pulley and the alternator pulley. Use a wrench or pipe to pry the against the whole alternator and tighten the belt. NOTE: Do not Rambo the alternator and overtighten the belt. This will just cause damage to all the bearings on all of the pulleys. The belt only needs to be tight with no slack between the alternator and the water pump. Tighten the bolts all around the alterantor, replace the wires and refill the radiator and the reservoir with 50/50 antifreeze. I used premixed anti-freeze but of course Toyota will tell you only to buy the red stuff from their parts deparment. Your choice. I don't think it matters. Toyota will also tell you not to follow my instructions but those of you who have had to survive like me and get by the best you can will understand that the dealer's advice is not always to your benefit.

Good luck and feel free to Email me! I think the Echo will be one of the last gas fueled vehicles on the road because it is so economical and still has the toyota quality engineering. I look forward to American made hybrid SUV's, pickups and cars but this Toyota will remain in the family for quite some time.

By the way, I hope GM stays in business because I wuv my Silverado pickup too.
 

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When I witnessed the check engine light on my 2000 Echo, I looked under the hood and discovered a 1/2 inch hose was disconnected from the air filter area. In other words, the hose actually goes back to a regulator and the wall of the car behind the engine but it was disconnecting from the air filter area of the car - towards the front of the car.

For several months I tried to put the hose back on with the existing clamp. It seemed to occur most often during hot weather and when I turned on the air conditioner. For several months I had to check this hose to make sure it didn't fall off because the check engine light will NOT come on immediately when this hose comes off. Recently, I used a non-standard hose clamp - the kind that screws on instead of the standard one that pinches on. Hopefully this won't cause more problems than I know what to deal with.

Outside of this hose problem here are other unrelated problems I experienced and fixed so far:

1) Hose coming loose from air filter area and check engine light coming on
2) Blower 2 relay failure (symptom: only high fan speed works inside car)
3) Water pump replacement

Water pump failure symptoms: rattle and squeaks under hood, serpentine belt unraveled and car began to overheat (red radiator light above blue radiator light started blinking)
Resolution: Stopped driving the car but added water to get it home to minimize damage. The old water pump will continue pump water but the bearing seals will leak fluids on the serpentine belt and the belt that goes to the power steering pump.

Tips and Tricks: These are obviously non-standard tricks of the trade but in order to get the water pump out you have to remove the alternator.

To drain the radiator completely, loosed the plastic radiator drain plug on the bottom side of the radiator. A wrench was not required for this and it can be done my hand unless someone really cranked on it.

To remove the alterantor you must loosen the bolt below the alternator and remove the two nuts on the slide aduster above the alternator, give the belt some slack and remove the belt. After removing the belt, remove the bolt below the alternator. Remove all the wires on the alternator. Thee's two hex head bolts and two plastic covers that must be removed. I was able to salvage both plastic connectors and I recommend this. Unfortunately one of the plastic locking tabs broke on one of the plastic covers but I ended using a spray on, non-permanent glue to put it back on and hold it after I replaced the water pump. Wiggle the alternator forward and backward while pulling upward until the alternator comes off completely. After removing the alternator from the engine compartment, gently set it aside for reuse. Next begin remove the four hex head bolts on the water pump pullet. The pulley must be stabilized by sticking a screwdriver threw the holes of the pulley and using the side wall of the engine compartment to keep it from turning while loosening and removing the bolts from the pulley. Next, beging removing the two nuts and three bolts from the water pump. The next steps are definitely non-standard but it worked for me. I did not worry about damaging the old water pump because it was very obvious the bearings were bad and I had a new water pump ready for installation.

To remove the water pump, you must first remove the wires attached to the sidewall/wheel well. There's two thick bolts and a locking bracket that can be removed to move these wires out of the way. Next, begin removing the water pump. Try to work the water pump toward the front the vehicle. Don't give up! I almost did because it is a very difficult task to remove it. The trick was to angle the back of the waterpump towards the front of the engine compartment and gently wiggle it back and forth until it came out. When you are on the right track you will notice the back of the water pump will lift up and out of the engine compartment. Wallah! You got it! Go have a drink and relax because you are half way there.

I'm sure my next steps will bring a lot of controversey here but if you know of a better way to get the little booger of a water pump back in, let's hear it! I put the gasket on the engine first. Next, I used a wheel grinder to grind the front and back of the new water pump shaft (ouch) by about 1/64" on each end. The grinding wheel didn't touch the bearing seals or the water pump impeller blades so I believe this is a safe method to use. This allows the water pump to go in without damaging the water pump impeller blades or the new water pump gasket that was installed.

The rest is self explanatory - put all the nuts and bolts back on the water pump - stagger the tightening of the nuts and bolts of the water pump to ensure an even seal on the gasket. Put the water pump pulley back on using the same screwdriver and wrenches you used to get it off. Replace the wire on the sidewall (wheel well side). Out the alternator back on and wiggle it back and forth until the lower bolt can be inserted. Continue wiggling the alternator while screwing the lower bolt in. This can't be done by hand - it will become too tight and you will need the wrench to get it back on semi-tight. After you get the lower bolt on semi-tight you can put the upper adjustment slide, nut and lock back on. Put the serpentine belt back on - the belt only rubs against the water pump and completely encircles the air conditioner pulley, the fly wheel pulley and the alternator pulley. Use a wrench or pipe to pry the against the whole alternator and tighten the belt. NOTE: Do not Rambo the alternator and overtighten the belt. This will just cause damage to all the bearings on all of the pulleys. The belt only needs to be tight with no slack between the alternator and the water pump. Tighten the bolts all around the alterantor, replace the wires and refill the radiator and the reservoir with 50/50 antifreeze. I used premixed anti-freeze but of course Toyota will tell you only to buy the red stuff from their parts deparment. Your choice. I don't think it matters. Toyota will also tell you not to follow my instructions but those of you who have had to survive like me and get by the best you can will understand that the dealer's advice is not always to your benefit.

Good luck and feel free to Email me! I think the Echo will be one of the last gas fueled vehicles on the road because it is so economical and still has the toyota quality engineering. I look forward to American made hybrid SUV's, pickups and cars but this Toyota will remain in the family for quite some time.

By the way, I hope GM stays in business because I wuv my Silverado pickup too.
 

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Raistlin

Raistlin said:
The check engine light in my 2000 echo went on a couple of months ago. I brought the car in to toyota a the code was p0171. And they verified the max air flow sensor and they said that is was within normal operation. But Since a couple of days now the car is having more problems stating and now and then the car stalles, not all the time. Anyone have any ideas ??????

Thanks.

I've experienced the same thing with my 2000 Echo, my check engine light wld come on and go off, come on and go off, I went to auto zone and they said the error code (dont remember code) indicated it was the oxygen sensor, I also took it to a mechanic and he said it appears I have a hole in my intake manifold....so basically if I dont let my car warm up in the morning, i'll drive and when I got to accerlate (car still running) it wont move I guess it's what one would calls stalls, but when I take my foot of the gas it will kind inch forward, and sometimes I just pump the gas or shift to 2nd to make it jolt out of doing what is does.

I dont have the $$$ to fix the car so the problem has gotten worse(i do however alone to car to warmup) but say I going down the highway when I get to 75 it starts to drop speed and seems to get stuck, so I do 80 now and if I let the speed go down, my car starts to act funny and it takes me longer or the car I shld say to stop stalling and dragging about.


I aslo got a free diagnostic at a transmission shop and they said it was my engine.


Any ideas and anyone with a digi cam, can u show me what and where the intake, and intake manifold is under the hood.


Thansk
 

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diagram?

Anyone have a picture or diagram of where the wires that lead to the MAF are? I just had the charcoal filter replaced cause thats what the dealer said was causing the light to be on (at $500+). A week after the light went on again! I hope it's just this little thng, but I don't know where the wires are so i can try cleaning them. Anyone?
 

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I started having a similar problem the other day. After starting the car, I press on the gas and the car barely moves - just inches forward. I'll take my foot off the gas and then try again and the car works just fine. Not sure what could be causing this.

Any ideas?
 

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Sounds exactly like a MAF sensor. We see it all the time at my shop. We have done 3 in the past couple of weeks at work. You can try to clean the sensor, and that may work for awhile. But if it comes on again (MIL) then you will have to replace the MAF sensor. It wouldn't be an 02 sensor because then that would give a specific code, saying which sensor and which bank it is in.
 

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I just bought my 2000 echo and had a problem with the MAF sensor. When I tried to move from a stand still, I had to pump the gas to get the revs up and then get moving. MAF sensor replace and it runs like a top.
 

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What next?

Hi!

I drive a 2000 Toyota Echo. I got it used at about 65,000 miles last year. Within a few months, the check engine light came on, and since I was completely broke at the time, I couldn't do anything about it but do my normal oil changes. I even got a tune up for it which cost me a grueling $100! And it didn't really help the problem in which my car would be really sluggish- basically the same problems described from other posts w/ a P0171 code. I later took it to Auto Zone, and they pulled up the P0171 code. After reading these posts, I decided to clean the MAF sensor, but even after doing so, even though it drove better, it was still acting up a little. So then, I just bought a new one and replaced the sensor. After that, the car ran 100% better- it picked up speed easily. However, now, a month later, the check engine light came on again- and it seems to be running fine... but now, I just have no idea what to do! Any suggestions? Thanks!

~Claraine
 
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