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My ZTE smart phone seems to be going out. It won't let me type an "S" or a "Z," when I'm texting. I guess I could try rotating the screen. Good thing none of those characters were in my screen password...

I cracked the screen last summer while crawling in an attic, but it had always worked fine after that - until a few days ago.

Dammit, that phone cost like $40 over three years ago!
 

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First World problem would be one of my nephews a couple years back bitching and complaining that his iPhone was too old at a full year old. How terrible. I mean, life isn't worth living, right, unless you've got the latest and greatest.

As far as I'm concerned, almost any First World complaint is reason to beg for the nuclear war to start, the violent aliens to enter orbit, the global pandemic to spread, and so forth, just to inject some reality back into the lives of certainly Europeans, Americans, and most Asian countries. 99.999% of Millennials have absolutely no clue what life was like even 40 years ago, and that people thrived in those days in spite of the relative lack of technology.
 

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First World problem would be one of my nephews a couple years back bitching and complaining that his iPhone was too old at a full year old. How terrible. I mean, life isn't worth living, right, unless you've got the latest and greatest.

As far as I'm concerned, almost any First World complaint is reason to beg for the nuclear war to start, the violent aliens to enter orbit, the global pandemic to spread, and so forth, just to inject some reality back into the lives of certainly Europeans, Americans, and most Asian countries. 99.999% of Millennials have absolutely no clue what life was like even 40 years ago, and that people thrived in those days in spite of the relative lack of technology.
Thank You. 👍
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Worker sacked after she refused to go to work following death of dog says bereavement laws should cover pets

I've had dogs most all my life, and cats, and lizards and rats and hamsters and fish and some weird smelly kid from down the block. Yes, it is sad when a loved pet dies, and maybe especially so if you do not have some elements of a family (siblings, children, etc.). But the need to take an entire day off work - the next day - because you are "too devastated and physically sick to do so"?

First World Problem.
 

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Even I can remember the days when phone service would go out from time to time, and you had to talk loudly or even shout during long distance phone calls, and that was with spin dial phones too. Computer math class in seventh grade was a teletype machine communicating to an off-site university mainframe over a sub-K baud rate modem. Fricking Jetsons back in the 1970s.
 

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Even I can remember the days when phone service would go out from time to time, and you had to talk loudly or even shout during long distance phone calls, and that was with spin dial phones too. Computer math class in seventh grade was a teletype machine communicating to an off-site university mainframe over a sub-K baud rate modem. Fricking Jetsons back in the 1970s.
Yeah, and if you screwed up on that punch card, a whole day or 2 were wasted. I'm so glad we've advanced since then, even if it's not quite for the better. ;)
 

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I remember my computer math teacher had examples of the old "magnetic donut" memory that was used in computers in those days, when disk drives were uncommon, three feet wide, and held maybe 40 megabytes. Anyway, the teacher showed us a memory module that was technology about five years old at the time (class was circa 1976) and it held 1,024 tiny magnetic donuts about 1 millimeter wide and strung with copper wire. One of the kids in the class marveled at how small it was and asked the teacher how small could memory get and how much data could be stored on it. And the teacher's response was....

"Technology has gone about as far as they can take it with computer memory, and there's nothing on the horizon that can surpass magnetic donut technology, so this is a small and as good as computer memory will ever get. There's just nothing out there that can surpass it."

LOL!!!

Well, we all know what has happened since. The greatest lesson I learned from that teacher and his perspective was/is never say never to how far technology can advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
I remember my computer math teacher had examples of the old "magnetic donut" memory that was used in computers in those days, when disk drives were uncommon, three feet wide, and held maybe 40 megabytes. Anyway, the teacher showed us a memory module that was technology about five years old at the time (class was circa 1976) and it held 1,024 tiny magnetic donuts about 1 millimeter wide and strung with copper wire. One of the kids in the class marveled at how small it was and asked the teacher how small could memory get and how much data could be stored on it. And the teacher's response was....

"Technology has gone about as far as they can take it with computer memory, and there's nothing on the horizon that can surpass magnetic donut technology, so this is a small and as good as computer memory will ever get. There's just nothing out there that can surpass it."

LOL!!!

Well, we all know what has happened since. The greatest lesson I learned from that teacher and his perspective was/is never say never to how far technology can advance.
I taught computer courses at various colleges for almost 20 years. In the first 13 years, when teaching at a local community college, I was talking about hard disk drives and their various sizes, and typically used my home computer (that I custom built) as a reference. One class a few ladies that were always buddying up, and that I knew from outside of class, meant to ask how big my hard disk was. What they actually asked was how big my hard dick was. They immediately realized their mistake, both burst out laughing, the one asking (a nice looking blonde) faintly blushing. I called a break time as there was no coming back from that any time soon.
 

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One of the kids in the class marveled at how small it was and asked the teacher how small could memory get and how much data could be stored on it. And the teacher's response was....

"Technology has gone about as far as they can take it with computer memory, and there's nothing on the horizon that can surpass magnetic donut technology, so this is a small and as good as computer memory will ever get. There's just nothing out there that can surpass it."

LOL!!!

Well, we all know what has happened since. The greatest lesson I learned from that teacher and his perspective was/is never say never to how far technology can advance.
Especially when the 2 Voyager space craft were sent to Mars on pre-programed wires in 1976 (so as to not contaminate the soil samples). I found that out from watching the Smithsonian Channel. ;)
 

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Those were Vikings 1 and 2. I've read that the soil analyses were inconclusive, some indicating the possibility of organics and life. I think it was more a matter of finding organics. I think it will take a future 2020s sample return mission to determine if there was ancient life. I'll bet there was.
 

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Those were Vikings 1 and 2. I've read that the soil analyses were inconclusive, some indicating the possibility of organics and life. I think it was more a matter of finding organics. I think it will take a future 2020s sample return mission to determine if there was ancient life. I'll bet there was.
Well, at the time, scientists were trying to find something that would survive being decontaminated before it was sent into space. Someone came up with the idea of using the wire to imprint the code onto it. I think at the time (1976) they were more concerned about it actually working, but never admitted it. As it was, they had to send a program for the arm's locking pin to drop out, as they never used the locking pin during all of the testing on Earth. D'oh. Another 24 hours of punch card code writing before sending a message to get it done.
 
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