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Honda Goldwing
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Discussion Starter #1
I 'm going in for my 30,000 mileage maintenance soon and they tell me to change ALL fluids at that mileage.

Question:
Is the transmission fluid good for 100,000 miles?
Doesn't the coolant last longer then 30,000 mileage?
What about Diff. and transfer case fluid changes?

Cheers!
 

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Honda Goldwing
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Discussion Starter #3

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There's a lot of inspections but no fluid changes.
Don't ever listen to a dealer about XX mile service. It is a complete scam. Look at the Toyota manuals and pick out the individual items to be done (if any). Forget about inspections. The dealer will do inspections for free whenever you have the vehicle in the shop for Toyota required maintenance, such as an oil change.

You can do some inspections yourself, like coolant level (in the overflow reservoir tank), brake fluid level, window washer, etc. Check the owners manual on how to do these.

You can also do engine air filters, and cabin air filters yourself. Parts are available in the dealer parts department.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Don't ever listen to a dealer about XX mile service. It is a complete scam..

I remember when I had my Lexus RX350.
I copied a page from my manual before sitting down with dealership service writer.

As I sat there he pulled out his own service list that included much more and different servicing.

I called Lexus owners 800 number when I got home about this and ask who the hell should I believe.
They told me go strictly by the manual that I received with my Lexus because it is the bible on servicing their units world wide in all driving conditions.
 

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I remember when I had my Lexus RX350.
I copied a page from my manual before sitting down with dealership service writer.

As I sat there he pulled out his own service list that included much more and different servicing.

I called Lexus owners 800 number when I got home about this and ask who the hell should I believe.
They told me go strictly by the manual that I received with my Lexus because it is the bible on servicing their units world wide in all driving conditions.
Automobile dealerships in the USA are required to be independent businesses and are not allowed to be owned by the manufacturer (with some minor exceptions). Dealers are in business to remove as much money from your wallet as possible, if you let them. I don't know why there is even any thought about listening to a dealer service writer instead of the manufacturer Owners Manual on such matters.

There is nothing new about this, it worked this way for billions of years.
 

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イリジウム
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How long do you plan to keep this truck? If you’re going to trade it in in 3-5 years just do what the manual says. Don’t allow their hands into your pocket.


I 'm going in for my 30,000 mileage maintenance soon and they tell me to change ALL fluids at that mileage.

Question:
Is the transmission fluid good for 100,000 miles?
Doesn't the coolant last longer then 30,000 mileage?
What about Diff. and transfer case fluid changes?

Cheers!
 

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Honda Goldwing
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Automobile dealerships in the USA are required to be independent businesses and are not allowed to be owned by the manufacturer (with some minor exceptions).
I wouldn't agree with this 10-20 years ago, maybe things have changed.

I remember Ford, GM and other car/truck manufactures told the small ma and pa dealerships if they didn't expand,
and stock larger inventories they wouldn't let them sell their products.

Some built larger dealerships, lost their @ss, and was force to go under.
 

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The car makers don't own the dealerships, but the makers can impose a lot of rules on them in order to keep the brand name on the side of the building.
 

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The car makers don't own the dealerships, but the makers can impose a lot of rules on them in order to keep the brand name on the side of the building.
Correct. Automakers "could" impose rules prohibiting dealers from pushing service that is not required by the manufacturer, but they are reluctant to do so because service is very important to the profitability of the dealership. Automakers need profitable dealers, who can sell their cars at slim profit margins to be competitive against other brands in the market place.

It is therefore important for consumers to understand this relationship, and to fend for themselves when discussing anything with a dealer salesperson or a service writer. Dealers are not gods, they are business people.
 

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Is the transmission fluid good for 100,000 miles?
Doesn't the coolant last longer then 30,000 mileage?
What about Diff. and transfer case fluid changes?
If you plan to sell-trade by 5 years / 60,000 miles then you don't need to bother with any of that.

But if you want to be assured of 150,000 miles or more of troublefree service then you should begin tranny pan drain and refills (not flushes) at around 30,000 and radiator drain and refills (not the whole cooling system) about every 3 years/30,000 (although the first change can be delayed to 5 years/50,000). And Diff. and transfer case every 5-10 years or 50,000. And brake fluid every 5 years/50,000.
Of all those services, the tranny is the most important because the fluid will already be brown at 30,000 because the 6 speed generates more wear debris than the previous 4 speeds and also runs hotter.
 

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Automobile dealerships in the USA are required to be independent businesses and are not allowed to be owned by the manufacturer (with some minor exceptions).

Most states have laws forbidding cars to be sold directly through the manufacturer, but not all. It's not a national law. Each state has their own.
 

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Oil definitely needs changing.


Radiator fluid is 4+ years old (depending on manufacturing date). I'd consider getting that changed. But you can always test it and see how clean it is first.


I change my tranny fluid on this vehicle every 50k miles. These tranny's run hot.
 

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Coolant is designed to go past 100k. Transmission fluid as well. Unless you do a lot of towing, you don't need any of those fluids changed yet.

As stated in earlier posts, consult your maintenance schedule in your owners manual. The dealer service department is not your friend no matter how awesome and honest that service writer appears to be, they are there to extract as much money as possible from your wallet. You as the owner need to take control of what services are necessary. The minimum price point that service dept wants to let your car go for is ~$450.00. Pay attention to what is going on with your car. Look for leaks, look at those brake pads, etc.

Last time I had my 4Runner in for a "free" Toyotacare oil change, the dealer wanted to change the air filter and cabin filter for a cool $100.00.

Cabin filter is about $10-$15 and a Toyota engine air filter can be had for about $25.00. It takes about 5 minutes to change both air filters. Told them to pound sand. My 4Runner has never set foot/tire in that dealership again.

The flip side to all of this, in this day and age of nobody fixing anything of their own any more (call an electrician to change a light bulb type of society), people love to see dealer service records when you try and sell it down the road. Does it add value to the car because it was maintained by "Toyota Trained" mechanics? Don't know, all it tells me is the owner way over paid for maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Does it add value to the car because it was maintained by "Toyota Trained" mechanics? Don't know, all it tells me is the owner way over paid for maintenance.

It does make a difference if service it at Toyota especially if you trade for another Toyota, Lexus is the same way.

I traded a Lexus RX 300 for a RX 350 without a lot of service records with Lexus, (I did my own oil changes and tire rotation's.)
When they valued my trade (RX 300) they mention the value is less because little service records are on file.

Of course they could say anything at that point, but all that dedication to Toyota might make a difference on trade.

One more thing about my '15 Highlander, I have the extended warranty with Toyota but I realize I still don't have to service
with Toyota just for that.

Bottom line is whatever makes you feel warm and fuzzy in the end.
 

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It does make a difference if service it at Toyota especially if you trade for another Toyota, Lexus is the same way.

I have to disagree with that. Trade-in or sale value is all based off the NADA or Blue-Book values. There is no mention what-so-ever in either of those publications if vehicle was serviced by dealer or independent or at home. If your HL gets totaled is the insurance company going to give you less because it wasn't serviced at the dealer?
 

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It does make a difference if service it at Toyota especially if you trade for another Toyota, Lexus is the same way.

I traded a Lexus RX 300 for a RX 350 without a lot of service records with Lexus, (I did my own oil changes and tire rotation's.)
When they valued my trade (RX 300) they mention the value is less because little service records are on file.

Of course they could say anything at that point, but all that dedication to Toyota might make a difference on trade.

One more thing about my '15 Highlander, I have the extended warranty with Toyota but I realize I still don't have to service
with Toyota just for that.

Bottom line is whatever makes you feel warm and fuzzy in the end.
It should make a difference, but with the toyota I traded for my highlander , the dealer that did 90% of my servicing offered me 2K to 4K or 15 % to 30% less than other toyota dealers who had nothing to do with the car.I had purchased it new originally from another dealer and did a couple of services there until moving cities, so it was 100% toyota dealer serviced, no accidents and only normal wear items replaced (new brakes and tires)They thought they could just rip off a loyal customer. When I walked out on them the salesman and sales manager tried to get me to go back in while I was sitting in my car about to drive off, what a bunch of...>:D
 

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It does make a difference if service it at Toyota especially if you trade for another Toyota, Lexus is the same way.

I traded a Lexus RX 300 for a RX 350 without a lot of service records with Lexus, (I did my own oil changes and tire rotation's.)
When they valued my trade (RX 300) they mention the value is less because little service records are on file.

Of course they could say anything at that point, but all that dedication to Toyota might make a difference on trade.

One more thing about my '15 Highlander, I have the extended warranty with Toyota but I realize I still don't have to service
with Toyota just for that.

Bottom line is whatever makes you feel warm and fuzzy in the end.
Totally understand your perspective. I keep a file on both my Toyota's with all the receipts, dates and mileage of when service was performed. Also, I started to get oil analyses done on my Avalon. I keep a copy of the report as well. But I tend to drive cars until they are worn out, and glad to get what I can when it is time for a new one.

Bottom line if they didn't try to knock the value down because lack of service records, they'd would have got you with something else. Unpopular color, not the right options, too many miles, too few miles, only 4 wheels, etc etc....

There are somethings that it pays to take it to a dealer. If you're having a problem you cannot troubleshoot or a good independent does not have access to the latest and greatest Toyota service bulletins, or specialized tools, in the end it is more efficient to let the dealer take care of it.

My last car that I had was a Chevy Cruze turbo diesel. Great little car, but had a ton of emission issues. Even the dealer would not touch it without consulting GM first. Basically GM's tech support would troubleshoot and dealer did exactly what GM told them to do.
 

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I'm amazed that people think their vehicle is serviced BETTER because they get it serviced at the dealer. Besides myself doing the work - I'd trust a good independent over a dealership any time. Dealerships are far better then places like Jiffy-Lube or Firestone. Dealers farm out a lot of their big work (like rebuilding a transmission) because they don't have the technical expertise in-house to do it.
 

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I'm amazed that people think their vehicle is serviced BETTER because they get it serviced at the dealer. Besides myself doing the work - I'd trust a good independent over a dealership any time. Dealerships are far better then places like Jiffy-Lube or Firestone. Dealers farm out a lot of their big work (like rebuilding a transmission) because they don't have the technical expertise in-house to do it.
It is not whether the dealer does as good a job as your favorite independent(no one necessarily else knows how good they are) If you have to sell the car , a buyer knows that it has been serviced regulary and with at least some competence, not taken to a dubious lube shop, or owner serviced by a less than competent owner or had serviced missed, the dealerships keep records that can be accessed by the entire dealer network, so the history is more reliable, OK a dishonest buyer, or dealer can still try and rip you off but it would not be because of service history.
 
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