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Discussion Starter #1
Now that the weather is starting to warm up, I think it is about time I get my 93 Camry running again.

First order of business: replace the fuel filler neck, which I will start today.

Second: Replace fuel return line, possibly return entire fuel line. I went on the AutoZone site and see a lot of different fuel line products. Can anyone make some recommendations. I want to keep this as simple as possible (easy to work with) and a minimum purchase of special tools that I may never use again.

The car has been sitting for almost two years, but it's a Toyota and I am confident I can get it roadworthy without to much of a problem.

The one I am working on is the 93 6 cyl Camry.

Any help you folks can offer is certainly appreciated.
 

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'96 Camry XLE
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I can tell you the fuel filler neck is straight forward and easy.

I have no idea about the return line though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can tell you the fuel filler neck is straight forward and easy.
I got the brackets off. I've been spraying the bolts for the last week and it was still a bit of a bear. Bolt heads were rusty, but I took a small wire brush and then tapped the socket on to make sure it was seated real good. Used a pipe as an extension bar and was able to get them off without snapping a bolt.

I didn't think about the straps and the one that connects the rubber hose that goes between the main tube and the tank is very rusted. Sprayed it down and will give it a try tomorrow, but have to figure out a way to get to it. Might be easier to take a Dremel and carefully cut the strap.

I couldn't believe how badly the filler neck was rotted. Living in Northern Ohio can take its toll on the underside of a car.
 

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if you are replacing the fuel return line, odds are you will have to replace the supply line as well. if you are anal like me and want to remove the old lines instead of leaving them in place, you will probably rupture the rear brake lines as well. (as per my experience.) i cheated and bought pre-bent lines from the dealer. this way i didnt have to worry about where all the bends needed to be.

if you want to cheat, grab a pipe cutter and remove only the bad section and use some rubber fuel line and band clamps to replace the bad section. i did this for a while until i decided to replace the whole line. i have also seen guys replace the whole line with a rubber line the full length of the car, though that is not the suggested way to fix.
 

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I'm in the process of replacing all of the front-to-back metal lines, brake lines to the rear wheels, and proportioning valve on a '94 wagon. I spent the $ to get the factory lines and am pretty happy I did. All the bends are right, the fittings are right, and the lengths are right. It's hard enough to route the lines much less worry about getting the bends, length correct. There are a lot of bends. If you do the lines, you'll probably need to get some of the plastic clamps that hold the lines to the car. They're very brittle and like to break when you try to pull the lines out of them. I'm also going to do the filler neck and tank straps while I have the car down. Everything under there is very rusty. I wish I'd looked closer when I bought this thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm in the process of replacing all of the front-to-back metal lines, brake lines to the rear wheels, and proportioning valve on a '94 wagon. I spent the $ to get the factory lines and am pretty happy I did. All the bends are right, the fittings are right, and the lengths are right. It's hard enough to route the lines much less worry about getting the bends, length correct. There are a lot of bends. If you do the lines, you'll probably need to get some of the plastic clamps that hold the lines to the car. They're very brittle and like to break when you try to pull the lines out of them. I'm also going to do the filler neck and tank straps while I have the car down. Everything under there is very rusty. I wish I'd looked closer when I bought this thing.
What did you pay for the factory fuel lines? Your brake line comment didn't help my enthusiasm. If you don't mind saying, what is the cost of all parts, brake and fuel lines?

I had to stop working on the car last weekend and still need to get the rubber hose (for the filler neck) off that connects to the tank. Can't get a tool (screwdriver or wrench) in there, so I will have to try cutting the strap.

Once I get the filler tube in, I will start looking at the fuel line and see if it is in a condition where I can take out sections or if it would be best to replace all of it. Right now the return line is broke where it bends upward towards the top of the tank. What I need to do is remove the plastic shield that runs down the center of the car to the front.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ASG, did you have a problem getting the large rubber tube off where it connects to the gas tank? I cut the metal strap (too difficult to remove the conventional way), but it won't budge. I'm trying to slice it with a razor knife, but the location makes it a slow go.
 

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I just unscrewed the clamp and it came off. I remember talking to my parts guy about it and he said the part where the rubber hose connects and goes into the tank is a replaceable item as well IF needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I just unscrewed the clamp and it came off. I remember talking to my parts guy about it and he said the part where the rubber hose connects and goes into the tank is a replaceable item as well IF needed.
I have the rubber hose, it's just that it has been on there so long it won't budge. I tried twisting it with a strap wrench an it just won't budge. I'm going to keep cutting it and it will eventually have to give.

What part are you referring to, the short neck that is connected to the tank and rubber hose?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, that's another option.

I am a victim of working on an old car that suffers from northern climate and road salt. Removing parts that have been in place for 16 years can be a pain.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, that part is done. Sliced it some more with a razor knife and then took a screwdriver to peel it off. Installed the new filler tube, but will need to get a new bracket that holds it in place (the old one was so rusted that the bolts snapped).

I checked out the fuel lines and they are in surprising good shape. If all goes right, all I will need to do is run a rubber return line from the fuel pump to the metal line that is about a foot or so from the place where it starts to run towards the front of the car.

It looks like the old return line is tac welded to the side of the fuel tank. Doesn't appear to be any clamps holding it to the tank.
 
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