Toyota Nation Forum banner

221 - 240 of 240 Posts

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #221
That's where I found my parts car. Eastern Washington state has to be just about the best place to buy a car from, ever. The car came in absolutely pristine condition, not a spec of rust on it anywhere, and all of the plastic interior trim was like new, in spite of it having the same 200k miles as my project car had (which was totally, absolutely, rusted out, and even living in SE Michigan, my trim was all baked and cracking).
I'd like to meet the previous owner of the donor car and thank them for taking such good care of it for me!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
If it came from Eastern Washington it saw a LOT of sun then. A lot of Eastern Washington is desert or farmland. Most people take care of their cars around here in Western Washington too. Really the only bad places for cars are Everette and Spokane. Rust is a non issue here, it's great.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #223 (Edited)
Differential check results:
teeth all look good but...
The planet gear backlash is almost 3x spec (0.002~0.008", and I've got 0.020").
303345

303346

303347

303348

303349


And an interesting thing I learned today: on previous FWD cars, one of the things to always check for was wear of the half shaft bearing surfaces at the diff, when they wear the diff main seals won't last. On those cars, mini for instance, those bushings are serviceable bronze parts.
But, on the E53 they are machined right into the Diff housing, so there's no way to service them:
303351


Guess I gotta hope there's no wear in them because there's no way to do anything about it if there is.

Regarding the excessive backlash, there are 4 planet thrust washers (spherical shaped) and 2 side gear thrust washers. On past differentials, wear of these parts was the primary cause of excessive play.
The planet gear thrust washers measure 0.58mm thick
The side gear thrust washers measure 1.1mm thick

I've read and re-read the jinglish in steps d) and e) and can't be sure I'm understanding it correctly. with the housing laying on the workbench, and dial indicator pointing down against the flat of one planet gear tooth, and the gears shifted all of the way outboard and then all of the way inboard, and rotating that one planet gear back and forth the backlash I measure is 0.020".
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #224
OK, after a lot of thinking and trying it again, I think I finally figured it out: the gears all get pushed out as far as they can go, and hold them there, then the dial indicator measure the movement of just one planet gear, making sure to keep the tooth surface horizontal to the ground and the dial indicator plunger vertical. Measure each of the 4 planet gears, one at a time. Then swap the whole assembly into the other half and measure the 4 again.
Measurement result: 0.007~0.008", right at the limit.

Will buy a new set of thrust washers and re-check it again after fitting new ones.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #225 (Edited)
While waiting for transmission parts I started cleaning and preparing the engine wire harness and building up the intake manifold/EGR/IAC/etc.
Quite a lot of the corrugated outer tubing ("COT") on the engine harness had crumbled, but luckily all of the wires and connectors look to be in healthy shape (though, covered with a LOT of crud).
Using the same technique as all the rest of the harness so far: foaming window cleaner + plastic bristle brush + red shop cloth, to clean off the dirt and oil. Brass wire brush in a drill to clean up the ground points.
McMaster-Carr sells COT with 300F temperature rating, and 3/4" wide 3M electrical tapes "33+", with 200F rating and "88", which is same but extra thick, so I can repair it all to be like new.
Having the EGR cooler, the intake manifold and the rest hot tanked by my local machine shop (last year) was genius, they are all as clean as a whistle inside.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #228
Windshield and Back Window in.
Gonna have to work on the back window molding with a heat gun to smooth out the (many) wrinkles. If it wasn't from the dealer I'd think it was not the right part.
303589

303590


Pro tip: install the lower back molding BEFORE you put in the back window.
It is a bear to get in afterwards.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #229
Engine wire harness done! This is, by far, the largest and most complex harness on the vehicle. It wraps around the engine, and branches out in big ways on 3 sides.

Top left is the grommet and harness connection to the Engine ECU inside the cabin, with the diagnostic port just outside of the grommet.
Just below that are the two banks of fuel injector connectors, and the VSV connections above the front bank.
To the lower left is the alternator, coolant temp and oil pressure connections (the "zig zag" before them is how it gets over the timing belt pulleys).
At the upper right are the throttle and air intake connections, as well as the speedo and neutral switch connections on the transmission, and the heavy gauge power supply to the interior of the vehicle.
Lower right is the battery connection, main engine room fuse box, starter,
303592
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #230
Next task: assemble transmission.

I call this photo, "MT DIY":
303594
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Over 200 lb ft of torque in the snow or wet is more than enough to slip one side. An LSD would assist with this. It's not necessary by any means of course.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #232
Pressed in all of the bearing races and seals yesterday, and bolted on the Diff cover (where the 4WD transaxle went on the E154 version of this transmission, when used in the 4WD Celica). Such large, M10 bolts for what is just a cover (because when it has the transaxle it gets plenty of load).

Super thankful to Project Binky, episode "Howie Did It"
for their great work showing how to do several aspects of this task. Also, for showing how to apply FIPG: not as a magically perfect bead, as the FSM implies, but as a messy smear that is then smoothed out by a finger to evenly cover the mating flange.

Also assembled the shift mechanism, but have to stop there because some key parts still have not arrived (oil pump base gasket, differential pinion gear thrust washers).

Nowhere local to buy Redline MT90 (75W90 GL-4 synthetic transmission oil that everyone has said is the bee's knees for this transmission), so had to order through the mail. Of course, their website indicated several places nearby but none of them actually carry it (grumble, internet information quality, and why didn't I call everywhere first, instead of drive all over town thinking "the next shop will have it").
 

·
short-throw dipstick
Joined
·
6,165 Posts
MT90 is pretty great, apparently it has some measure of ATF additives in it (friction modifiers, but just enough). If I can wait I like to get it from Amazon.
 
  • Like
Reactions: norm356

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #234 (Edited)
Today's result: pre-assemble the transmission halves, and list up all of the service parts required, along with the drift punch sizes, to help someone else plan for this same project some day:
303820

303821


Transaxle side:
303822


Bell housing / Diff side:
303823
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #235
MT Rebuild tips:

Video 1) Project Binky E154 MT (4WD Celica transmission, which is amazingly similar to an E53, except the differential cover, and the transfer case stuck on there). These guys make the best videos.

Video 2) ’93 MR2 E153 MT rebuild (also very similar to an E53). Two part video, not well made, and too slow, but shows the parts pretty well.

Note that neither of those videos show how to assess the condition of the parts, they simply open up the transmission, replace the seals and reassemble. For condition check (bearings, synchros, etc), use the specs in the FSM.

Video 3) Synchro rings and, in general, how to asses their condition, helpful to grasp how they work.


The FSM has all of the specs for confirming clearances, gaps, freeplay, backlash and so on. You will need feeler gauges and a dial indicator to do all of the checks.


Tools:
The transmission will weigh around 90 lbs, so you’ll need a way to get it out of the car and onto a workbench, or onto a sheet of plywood on the floor with some clean cardboard over it as a work surface.
T45 tool for removing the lock pins.
T50 tool for disassembling the differential
Torque wrench (of course), but also a small 0~15 in-lb torque wrench for setting / confirming bearing preload.
Dial indicator
plastic hammer
brass drift (NEVER hit a bearing race, or the bare aluminum case halves, directly with a steel hammer)
a set of 3” long drift punches to drive out the spring pins (1 in reverse lockout, 2 in shift mechanism shaft)


Besides normal tools, like the above, you’ll need various gear pullers to remove gears and bearing races.
3-Jaw, outside grip
“Harmonic Balancer puller / Steering Wheel puller” (3 threaded bolts around the perimeter + 1 big threaded pushing screw in the middle)
Home made puller for input shaft rear bearing (like a large pilot bearing)
Pilot bearing puller + slide hammer for shift rod needle bearings, note the SST has a block inside to keep the jaws spread out, without it the needle bearings can be VERY difficult to pull
Gear puller for separating the gear sets (this is the kind with the narrow “guillotine” jaws for pulling gears with very small clearance behind them).

I have a pretty large assortment of gear pullers and gripping puller things, and screw operated pushers with a variety of round things to push with, but I still had to pay my local machine shop to get some of the races out. The very small needle bearing buried in the shift housing on top of the transaxle was a BEAR to get out, too thin for normal pullers, and too deep down in for most other tools. Finally it had to be destroyed and cut out. Luckily, that one is available new. The other, easy to get to needle bearing in that housing was easy to press out and back in after glass bead blasting the cases, was NOT available new, so that was lucky.

Various diameters of things for pushing bearing races and seals home (Harbor Freight sells several different sets, I used all of them).

A hydraulic press can be handy. A hammer and some various diameters of brass rod can be used to great effect (and you can rotate around the part as you apply lots of little taps, to keep it from getting cocked in the hole).

A tube of Toyota’s FPG “Red” (for driveline case assembly). The above videos use the Toyota FPG “Black” (for engine assembly), which works, but the Red is more suited to the kind of oils used in a transmission/differential.

4.5 quarts of Redline MT-90 (75W90 synthetic gearbox oil, GL-4). Liberally coat all moving surfaces during assembly. The fact that it is GL-4 is supposed to make it best for manual transmission synchros (according to their website, some GL-5s are only meant for differentials and can make synchros slip too much, resulting in notchy gear changes).

Lock-tite Blue for all of the bolts the FSM calls out for.

If you buy new bolts from Toyota, then the torque values in the FSM apply. If you don’t use all new bolts, then use anti-seize grease on the threads to prevent aluminum galling in the threads during torquing, which would lead to a real mess on next disassembly if you didn’t do that, and make certain that you do not exceed the torque values in the FSM. I always reduce torque values -40% when using a lube like anti-seize to avoid risk of yielding the threads by mistake.


Be careful not to allow 5th gear synchro assembly come apart while handling it. Putting it back together is tricky, and the FSM is not exceedingly clear on how the many small pieces go. Finally I figured out the shorter “spring ring” leg goes through the inboard hole, and the taller, upper spring ring leg goes through the outboard hole in the mating “tri” shaped gear housing, and the 3 claws on each spring ring go over the 3 cut away portions of the synchro rings so that they will reduce in diameter enough to slip into the mating tri shaped gear housing.
Once you get them all oriented right it slips together nicely, so don’t force it.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #236
Here's photos of SOME of the tools in action:
I forgot to take a photo of using a harmonic balancer / steering wheel puller to remove the 5th gear off of the end of the input shaft, but here it is on a table top:
303824


one of these pulls the mating 5th gear off of the output shaft:
303825


Much later in the process, here's how to get the reverse lockout out of the case. Drift out the spring pin:
303826

Then drive this up, and out of its hole using a long drift:
303827

Like this:
303828


Here's how to drive out the RH shaft bearing and seal, using a large diameter thing on one side, with a screw in the middle:
303829

and a larger diameter thing on the other side so you can screw them together, extracting the race, shim, seal and resin oil guide
303830

303831


The diff cover uses massively large studs and bolts (although it is only a cover on our E53 MT, it is where the transfer case went on the 4WD Celica E154 MT, then those large bolts are needed). I didn't have a stud extractor large enough so used the tried and true "two nuts torqued against each other" method instead:
303832


To get the big needle bearing out of the transaxle case you need to be very clever. See next post for how:
303833
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #237 (Edited)
To remove that large needle bearing from the transaxle case, there isn't enough room behind it for any normal jaws to grip. So, use 2 large, thick washers that just barely fit inside the ID of the needles, and then 3 thin fender washers, cut into 120degree pie slices so you can fit them together, slid outboard and under the bearing race, like this:
303834


Sandwich those three "pie slices" with the two thick washers, like this, and then clamp the sandwich together with a nut and long bolt.
303835


Then either use a slide hammer, or a large diameter support and a lid to screw up against, to pull the bearing up and out: (sorry, photo is blurry)
303836


Here is a detail of how that little tools works:
303837


And here's my sketch of this home made "SST":
303838



You will want a magnet on a stick to pull out the various shift detent balls:
If you don't have one, use a thin screwdriver, and then hold a strong magnet against its shaft to make it momentarily magnetic, for the same effect.
303839



Be systematic so you don't get mixed up, with all of the very similar looking but NOT interchangeable parts, and take LOTS of pictures:
303840



To get the big stake nut off of the end of the input shaft (holding 5th gear to the output shaft), you need to unstake it using an impact air tool like this (my "SST"):
303841


In order to undo that nut, it is necessary to engage multiple gears at the same time to lock the transmission.
These are the levers you must move one way or the other to do that (looking through the shift mechanism hole, after removing it):
303842


To move them, use a crowbar and a piece of wood like this:
303843
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #238 (Edited)
To check 5th gear oil clearance and end play, you use a dial indicator like this:

Checking oil clearance. This is very touchy because any rotation of the gear makes the needle move all over the place. You have to move it back and forth a lot of times, looking for the smallest number.
303854


I checked the end play this way:
303855


303856


In this photo you can see the 2 golden synchro rings on 5th gear that I mentioned at the end of post #235. Gripping them you can see the silver claws from those spring rings, and the 3 pronged gear that their assembly drops into. The inboard hole for the short leg from the spring ring nearest us is to the upper right, and the outboard hole for the long leg from the spring ring farthest from us is at the bottom of this photo.

The only way those rings will fit into the grey, 3 pronged gear is when their claws are oriented in the cutouts you can see in this photo, then you can compress the ring to fit into the 3 pronged gear and slide down, then do the next one. Until you figure out that those fingers go through those two holes, and only when properly oriented, it just will not go together. The FSM has a few sentences and an unclear illustration, but really fails to adequately explain any of it.

The 3 symmetrically placed, threaded holes are for pulling the whole assembly off the end of the input shaft (after the c-clip that you can just barely see in this photo is removed).

To remove the many c-clips, the FSM shows a very clever technique using two screwdrivers and a hammer. But, this only works when the two screwdrivers are the exact same length and size. Put one against each end of the c-clip and then hit their handles with a hammer turned sideways so its head is really wide. Put a rag over the c-clip first, so it won't go flying and be lost.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #239
Since MT work is done, just re-assembly is on hold for parts, it is time to start studying the engine.
To get situated I mapped out what things are:

303930



303931

303932


There are a lot of sensors and controllers that need testing to confirm they can be re-used or not, so that's next step.

There's one orphan wire harness connector, near the oil pressure sensor, that is not connected on either vehicle I have to study. Doesn't look like there was a CA destination part there either. Interesting. (its the white one at the lower left of the top photo above, white connector housing).

There was one mystery connector from the engine room wire harness that had me scratching my head for a long time (round, grey, 7 pin). Today I realized it is for the cruise control!

There was one mystery connector inside, under the glove box, from the cowl wire harness (large, 2 prong) that also had me wondering until just recently I realized it goes to the HVAC fan (couldn't see the male mate on the bottom of the HVAC housing until I ruled out all of the engine wire harness connectors).

While it isn't the same thing as making actual progress, it is still reassuring to figure some things out.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
Discussion Starter #240
Yet another correction to add:
This one to something I said in, like, page 1 of this thread. I'd been told, and repeated it here without first checking it, "the 3MZ AT engine couldn't be used with the manual transmission because the crank was different".

But, it turns out, the 3MZ crank is NOT unique, between AT and MT versions. From the adoption of the 1MZ the AT crank was changed, and I'm sure that's what somebody told me, based on. Just now I realized I'd never actually looked into it, and after some research have confirmed the crank is the same part number, for both AT and MT 3VZ engines. The flywheel used for the MT, incidentally, was carry over from the 2VZ earlier, 2.5L V6 engine, and was still used through the Solara use of the E153 MT on the 1MZ engine, into the early 2000s. Apparently, it was the AT crank which was changed, when the 1MZ was introduced, which made THAT AT one no longer compatible with the MT application.

Summary: an E53 MT ('92~'93 V6 Camry) or an E153 MT (early '90s I4 MR2*, or late '90s V6 Camry or Solara, can be bolted to a 3VZ engine (regardless of whether that engine was originally an AT or MT application) or to an MT 1MZ engine (bolt patterns for the bell housings and the crank x flywheel joint are same, V6 flywheel is same, etc.).

* note that an E153 from an MR2 has the shifter come out the wrong way for use in a Camry.

From studying the Project Binky E154 MT video posted above, it looks like it would fit, too. That could allow someone to make a Gen3 Camry 4WD, if they were spirited enough to make all the rest of the body modifications to fit RWD to it (and all custom drive shafts, and rear suspension and so on).
 
221 - 240 of 240 Posts
Top