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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #241
Update on post #223 & 224, differential inspection:
The freeplay in the planet gears (FSM calls them "pinion" gears) was the only measurement in this whole transaxle which was out of spec. The side gear thrust washers which were available in various thicknesses to tune it are NLA, so there isn't any way to adjust it, so all I could do was put in new 4 thrust washers for the planet gears. The old ones measured 0.058", the new ones measure 0.060", but after fitting them the freeplay was so nearly the same I'd say there was no meaningful difference (maybe the 0.007" play was reduced to 0.005" on one gear, but another gear which was 0.013" was still 0.013" after). I'm glad I replaced them, just to make sure, but, honestly, the play in the differential is not a major driveline wear component (the aspect this freeplay involves only functions while turning), so I think I can just put it back together and move on.

Here's a photo of two of the new washers (top) beside the old ones (below). Visually, the old ones were more shiny, from wear:
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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #242
Cowl insulation project completed (continuation of post #212):
I used a 48" length of hardware store stair edge (PVC angle, about 1" per side, ribbed on one face, tapered smooth on the other face). Trimmed to length, added darts to form over the shape of the cowl, and then pierced 1/4" holes for attaching.
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The 1/2" fiberglass insulation would hold water if it got soaked from above, so this "L" section will act as an umbrella to direct water to shed over the top, instead. There is a small clearance at the bottom before the Cowl pinch flange, so that any water that did get in there could simply gravity drip out and away.

It would have been easier to fit if the portion slipped under the cowl louver was a little thinner, but it works, and the clips are able to retain everything, so I call that a win.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #243 (Edited)
Engine sensors check.
Here are almost all of the engine sensors (the only one not shown is the water temp sender for the dash gauge, it is on the front of the LH (rear) cylinder head).

After running the checks for each one (resistance at temp, or open/closed at certain temp, using a pot of hot water on the stove, a meat thermometer, an ohm meter and some vacuum hose, or open/closed at battery voltage), every one tested right to factory specs (the FSM really is an amazing book, it has everything spelled out).

What I did was soak each one in vinegar overnight, to remove tarnish, and any mineral build up, then plastic bristle brush + foaming glass cleaner & a red shop rag to clean off the oil and grunge off the tops.

The two copper sealing washers can be reused once they've been heated to change color by a propane torch (it anneals copper). All of the threads get treated to Blue Loc-Tite for assembly.

The 4 at the top go into the Water Bypass, at the rear of the engine (LH side of the engine bay).
The 2 VSV go in the V, under the engine cover.
The water temp at the bottom, for the fan ECU, goes into the water outlet housing (beside the thermostat), and the oil pressure sender goes beside the oil filter.
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Amazing to be working on a nearly 30 year old engine, with over 200k miles on it, and all of the parts are not just re-usable, but spot on original factory targets.
The machine shop has already confirmed the pistons are as good as new, just bearings and seals (and head gaskets).

Completed Water Bypass assembly:
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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #244 (Edited)
Yet another SST you can make at home:
SST 09843-18020, is the tool you use for all of the engine checks via the OBD1 interface (where you do things like short terminals E1 and TL1, to make the fan go on, or whatever). Most people use a bent paperclip, but for a more sure tool that won't fall out, you can get a pair of wire harness repair pieces, 82998-12330 (it is a male 090 terminal crimped onto 150mm of wire) and butt splice them together, add some heat shrink tape and voila.
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Like this:
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The cover of the OBD1 diagnostic port has all of the sockets labelled (ignore the nasty looking grease in the holes, its there to prevent corrosion).
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Update: I went through Vol1 & Vol2 of the FSM and listed up the things that can be done with the DLC1 and DLC2:
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DLC1:
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DLC2:
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Next is to get a copy of Vol3 "Trouble shooting" and see if that has anything more, or is merely a collection of these gathered together for easier reference.
 

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Does the OBD1 port need to be greased though? I figured as long as the cover was there it'd be ok, although I'm only basing this on the condition of the contacts on my own OBD port which look spotless after 20+ years. Mind you there's (usually) no rust issues where I live. Understandable if it's a peace of mind/preventative maintenance thing though.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #246
Good question. I had never really looked under that cover in all the years I'd owned this car, until now that I'm rebuilding it. My assumption was the wire harness maker had greased it (as they do for quite a lot of the critical joins), especially since the cover has no rubber water seal.
Or perhaps a previous mechanic had done so as a preventative measure for me, since SE MI where I live is a very rusty environment.
 

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Discussion Starter #247
I've always thought of if as the "OBD1 Port", since that's what they are called on OBDII vehicles.
Just now I realized Toyota called it "Data Link Connector 1 / Check Connector" (in the engine bay) and "Data Link Connector 2 / TDCL (Toyota Diagnostic Communication Link)" under the dash.

They both seem to have many of the same terminals (so systems can be accessed from either place), but there are a few differences in what is available, and the one under the hood has a few more than the one under the dash).

The one under the dash is a royal pain because its orientation makes it nearly impossible to read easily, so having the duplicate one under the hood is nice, but when you have to count blinks of the CEL on the combi-meter one really has no choice but deal with the one under the dash.
 

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When I first saw the one under the dash I was a bit surprised, wasn't expecting that there while I was looking for that infernal integration relay to get rid of that dome light fade out, but with absolutely zero wiring diagrams for aussie camrys it was a lost cause trying to figure out which wire went to which light etc. Now I'm just waiting on some LEDs for the dome and trunk lights I bought off aliexpress, will see how those go and if they crap out I'll just buy some from superbright.

On an unrelated note, does your donor car happen to have a plastic cover for the cabin air filter? If you don't need it I'd gladly take it off your hands...lol
 

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Toyota always called it a Data Link Connector but it's a type of OBD. The terminals are greased from factory with an electric grease to prevent corrosion. Look at how some battery terminals get. I have seen a few older cars where people don't replace the grease after using the ports and they start to rust and corrode. Imagine how bad it would be that something goes wrong and your CEL goes on, you go to jump the ports to get the code and you can't due to rust/corrosion. Talk about a bad time. Remember, a CEL on OBD is way worse than a CEL on OBDII
 

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I think if you get a CEL light on a 3VZ you dun goofed really hard because this engine practically never lights up, even for pinging.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #251
Engine top end prep. Upper intake done, each of the devices tested and are to manufacturing nominal values. The EGR, the Throttle Body and the Intake Air Control valve only had a little grime inside, which cleaned up with grease remover and stiff brushes. Put new O-rings in the IAC valve. All new gaskets, and the fasteners were all cleaned by spinning them in a drill against a brass brush, and installed with anti-seize on the threads.
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I've got about 8' of vacuum hose on order. While waiting for that next thing is to sort out the (many) water hoses this system uses.
The big air pipe from the air cleaner to the throttle body cracked when I took it off. Have ordered a new one from the dealer, hopefully it comes through (if I was only fixing up an old car probably would have tried repairing it with RTV, but if I can get a new one that will hold up that'll be best).
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #252
For about a year now I've been sweating pickles, worrying about which of the pre-formed hoses which are NLA would cause me the most trouble during re-assembly.
Well, now that the upper intake is put together, it is finally possible to go through everything and check, routing all the new hoses, and clamping them into place, and sorting through the little pile I'd bought last summer just after tearing down the engine.
Looks like only one heater hose is still NLA. I bought a 1MZ one in hopes its shape will be close enough.

Somehow I'd thought it would be more difficult that that!

There are some fuel lines which are also NLA, but cut to length stock seems to be working (so far), because they don't have such special shapes as the many, various water hoses have.
 

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sweating pickles
Wahaha!

I'm running into this issue with my aunt's '95 DX; parts availability is annoying and the main Japanese suppliers kinda suck at checking availability. Her manual window regulator is worn out and is NLA, but the overseas catalogs suggested the '92-'94 regulator as a possible replacement, and those are still available NOS in the States. I figure $75 is worth it to try and get rid of the wind noise from the unplanned NACA duct at the top.

Plenum looks nice - I did that recently as well, but also opted to take apart my throttle body and have it vapor blasted. Came out very nice, and it smooths out the plate and bore. IME you should always double-clean with compressed air after a bout of vapor blasting; they dip in water to remove the media and it doesn't get it out of blind holes and the like.
 

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You have been very good at providing pictures as you go along. I DEMAND a picture of you sweating pickles.
 
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Discussion Starter #255
Insight: the '92/'93 W/Reg is definitely a replacement for the '95 one (the door inner didn't change). You should be all set. I opted not to use vapor blasting for the TB because the TPS mechanism I couldn't figure out how to remove.

😬 = picture of me s/pickles
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #256 (Edited)
What differences between an AT and an MT Gen3 Camry:
- we've already noted the (obvious) 3 mounting holes in the firewall for the Clutch master cylinder, and the parking brake lever (foot -> hand brake), and the shift mounting studs on the floor (the front 2 AT studs need to be cut off for the MT shift to fit), and the gas pedal (the MT pedal return spring is about 2x as strong as the AT spring). What I did about the gas pedal was fit the AT one, to see if the weaker spring will make the engine feel more lively (I'm guessing the reason for the lighter spring on the AT was to help compensate for the tremendous loss of power folks strapped with the AT had to live with, but that's a wild guess).

Well I found 2 more differences this week!
Throttle Body - the AT TB has the additional bell crank for the kick down cable to the ATM, that doesn't really matter (no need to change it, it doesn't take up any space).
The big difference is the MT TB has that awful dashpot that holds the throttle open during shifting (the sudden close of the throttle plate during shifts results in a little dump of rich mixture each time, holding the throttle open helps keep it lean). That dashpot is not available, mine is cracked and failing, and the AT throttle body was in WAY better shape, so that's what I'm going to use:

side x side comparison of (clean) AT TB and (rusty) MT TB, pointing to the "throttle hold" dashpot on the MT one:
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Now pointing to the lack of AT kick down bell crank on the MT TB:
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here's a closeup of that bell crank on the AT one:
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The other difference between the AT x MT is the EGR:
I tore down a scrap one of each and found several internal differences. If my calculations are correct, the AT EGR flows something like 30% more exhaust into the intake than the MT one does (smaller orifice at the mating surface, smaller orifice where the internal pin seals the main inlet and 2x heavier spring on the MT one).

Here's a photo of the AT parts lined up, the EGR is on the left, you can see the mating surface orifice is visible:
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Left to right:
EGR, Throttle Body, Idle Air Control valve (the IAC, and all of the other components are common parts, ATxMT, as far as I can tell).

The black gloop visible on the bottom of the IAC is intake residue, it cleaned off with some grease cutter, plastic bristle brush and soap and water, and the part was shiny like new underneath.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #257 (Edited)
Your AFM and you: The 3VZ has the incredibly simple and rugged AFM, instead of the MAF the later 1MZ engine used. According to the MR2 folks who did tons of tuning on the 3VZ, this AFM is really neat, and simple and it can accommodate huge increases in engine power output without requiring anything done to it.

Here's one cut open so you can see what is in the bottom of it. There's a clockwork mechanism that winds up when the air flow pushes the AFM door open, and it provides air flow information to the engine ECU based on that door opening angle. There is also a switch that turns on the fuel pump when the door just begins to move:
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Here's a top view, with the other cover taken off. This is engine "off" condition (the door is completely closed), filter to the right, engine to the left, and you can see the idle circuit on the bottom:
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Wide open throttle (it is incredible how simple this mechanism is):
The little dowel sticking into the intake air stream visible in this photo (on the right) is the Intake Air Temp sensor.
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Here's a detail of the idle circuit at the engine side (note the brass colored plug that meters the flow of air that bypasses the AFM during idle, it was screwed in/out during manufacture to hit a target value and then the head of the screw was potted with some zinc, you can see that end in the first photo above, lower RH corner):
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...and this is the filter side of that idle bypass circuit:
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Little secret, the 3s motors and the 5sfe use these as well and can be tuned a little with it. Not as much as a 3vz though.
 

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That plug blocking the idle bypass screw can be drilled out to pull out, then you can adjust the screw but there's really no need to, at least in NA applications. I'm actually curious now as to what the bottom cover of the AFM looks like now that I realise that I've never actually seen the bottom of one.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #260
Hi Ed, Not sure what you are asking, is there an additional photo that you'd like me to post?
 
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