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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #261
Today is a big day:
Last night I cleaned and sorted out the AFM (and did the tests in the FSM to confirm it was all within spec).
Today I cleaned the cruise control mechanism and conducted its tests.

That officially signals the end of the restoration of the parts on this project. All of the shelves are now either bare (already installed), or the parts on them are completely restored already and just waiting their turn to be installed.

It has been a good year (well, actually, almost 2 years since I bought the parts car in 9/'18), with a couple of rests along the way.

Next step: install the many, many vacuum hoses, and some remaining air, water and fuel hoses, and then wait for the engine.
The differential side thrust washers are back ordered until 7/E (previously I'd said they were NLA, but after more searching, once I knew exactly which thickness I wanted, I found a source - that diff was used in a LOT of vehicles through the '90s and '00s). So, the assembly of the transaxle is on hold until then.

Milestones are good, when reached (they taunt if you think about them too much, along the way though, that's probably why they feel so good when passed).
 

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Oh I was referring to the plate that you took off the AFM to reveal the innards. It's pretty neat how simple the whole assembly is. At least in principle.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #263
Vacuum hose arrived today, so we had a party:
304900

304901

304902


That signals the end of the water and vacuum hoses.
There are some fuel hoses to cut to length, but will need the engine for those, I think.
 

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Goddamn that intake plenum looks delicious.

Are you planning on sticking a cabin air filter in? I actually managed to find a yard that had a few wrecked ES300s, the moment I saw them first thing I went and pulled back the driver side footwell carpet...and all of them had cabin air filter covers! I was pretty stoked to say the least. Was worth noting that of the 5 ES300s that I pulled the covers off, every one of them had a pile of leaves and sticks and other debris where the filter normally went that had built up there over the years. They all used the 97-01 AC units judging by the white plastic covers they had, as well as the fact that every single camry that was there as well had identical AC units, minus the cabin filter covers. Looks like we had our own gen 3.5 camrys but the engine remained the same, just had other differences instead.

Also got incredibly lucky when I opened the trunk of one of the camrys and inside were the wood boards that cover the trunk side pockets where the scissor jack goes as well as the cover for the opposing side. Also just sitting there waiting for me was a very good condition plastic undercover that goes right below the engine. Only damage it had were superficial scratches, nothing was broken off, I couldn't believe it. One of the ES300s also had an almost intact spare wheel cover too, you bet I took all that home. I think now I know what it's like when you go to a garage sale and find something you've been looking forever for. Are you planning on using OEM spare wheel cover/trunk boards or you going to cut your own out of a stronger material? I know the OEM ones are rather vulnerable to water damage and tend to sag with weight on them.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #265
"Are you planning on sticking a cabin air filter in?" - already have!
"Are you planning on using OEM spare wheel cover/trunk boards" - yes, the OEM ones have worked fine all these years. But you are right, if they ever get wet for long enough to warp, they can easily be replicated by jigsaw cutting replicas out of 1/4" luan (very thin plywood), and then screw/rivet the little plastic brackets/jack handle clips to them.

Great news on the treasure trove of parts you found, what a great feeling.
Last summer, at a Pick-N-Pull yard in Detroit I found a '95 which provided me with my R134a hard pipes, and with several of the engine room brake hard lines (it suuuuuuucked getting those off of a car with an engine in it), and a few other needed parts like an outside handle, in good condition. That trip also showed me that pretty much no OEM spoilers were going to be any good anymore (they all had the same issues with rusted/failed mounting studs and internal BMC resin breakdown). Hopefully the aftermarket one I ended up buying will work well (time will tell).
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #266
"Goddamn that intake plenum looks delicious." - yeah, I find that I just keep staring at it!
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #268 (Edited)
Vacuum hose, two of these does a whole car: 90999-92008 (2.6m each), with about 30" to spare (what you see in my hand).

304970


Also, you'll need about 2 feet of 7mm ID fuel hose for vapor return lines and about 3 feet of 6mm ID fuel hose for supply lines, and for that air breather line you can see in the photo above, nearest to the upper intake, which supplies additional air to the injector passages in the intake during idle.

Here's all of the fuel lines done, along with the prepared pressure regulator and damper, and attaching hardware and aluminum sealing washers for all of the fuel banjo joints (and the rest of the vacuum lines and the water hoses beside them):
304973


Front subframe sealed with cavity wax inside (and a lot of it got on the outside, too), and all of the holes plugged back up, and the threaded holes all chased after paint, and the great big corner cushions pressed into their place by hydraulic press (its a bit of a juggling act, supporting this 40lb frame up in the air, lining it up with the press and positioning the big steel ring used to press down with):
304974


I used a 2.5 ft tall wooden block, with some 2x6 offcuts on top as shims, to support one corner, and a pile of stacked 5 gallon buckets to support the other corner (adding/removing buckets as shims for height), and then I stood in the middle of the frame to lift it up and position it beneath the press. Before pressing in the corner cushions I swabbed the mating surfaces with anti-seize to keep water out, and to help it slide in.

I am quickly running out of tasks to perform and when I do will have to just sit around and wait until the engine comes back.

Going through the last of the boxes today, to make sure what I have and don't have, and confirming there won't be any surprises when it comes time to put in the engine (most of these parts I bought over a year ago, during the strip down, so memory is dull, and there were a couple "oh THATS where that part has been all of this time" today).
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #269
It is interesting to be at this stage of the project because for 2 years now, any time I thought about things "at the end", like tie rod ends, starter, alternator, oil, oil filter, coolant, brake fluid, power steering fluid, I always said, "yeah, someday I'll be at the point when it is worth thinking about those things, in the meantime I'd only be tripping over them, so wait until later".

That time is now.

I was so sure I'd bought a set of TRE, and of the special nuts and star shaped washers and cotter pins to hold the axles into the hubs, but going through the last, few remaining boxes, and going back to the order sheets from 2 years of parts gathering finally convinced myself I had not.
When there are only a couple of boxes left it doesn't take as long as it use to, to find something.

Moved all of the scrap parts into the scrap (donor car) body. Placed a big "come and get it" for sale ad over in the "free" section of this website, but after a few weeks there've been no takers.
Some small parts I am going to keep "just in case", but there is only so much space I want to dedicate to "maybe, someday, if I need this...", so there are a lot of possibly good parts going in the dumper (a set of half shafts that are probably good, all of the ATM shifter, foot parking brake, center console, and so on, most of the extra interior). Eventually (pretty soon), there will also be the spare 3VZ engine, and the AT, I'll be ready to dump, but they are so heavy can't imagine anyone wanting to pay to have them shipped anywhere.

There's also a complete set of good condition ABS brake lines, proportioning valve, ABS control module and ECU. Also a set of exterior mirrors, and a complete set of wire harness (ATM + ABS version vehicle, so I can't use them).

Oh well, Toyota parts last so long, most of those parts won't ever need to be replaced, and if they did, these vehicles were pretty plentiful, that there probably are local pick-n-pulls with better quality of any of them anyway, so there really isn't much point in anyone getting these from me, because these ones already have 200k miles on them as it is.
 

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Did US camrys come with a side luggage tray in the trunk? I think it went in the left pocket. Forked out about 65 bucks for mine (at cost...not sure why it's so much for a bit of plastic lol) but I wanted all the options. Wonder if your one has one, or maybe that was an option reserved for higher trims.

I'm also debating whether to get a set of faux leather sun visors from the wreckers as my old wagon had them and I never realised just how much easier they were to keep clean. Only problem is if I do get a pair and clean them and put them back in then I'll have a set of cloth visors lying around taking space. A tale as old as time...
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #271
it didn't come with that little pocket on the left originally, there was a flat hardboard cover piece and the luggage floor covered it

but, in my junkyard searches I found a used one and will cut my luggage floor trim to match

My jack was rusted into place, with the tools, so I abandoned those and found good condition ones that I sanded and re-painted (and a vinyl tool bag in decent condition that cleaned up nice).

Now I just have to find a spare tire / wheel large enough for one of those new "drop in" subwoofers that go in the center of the spare after you flip it over. Seems like they all are made for 16" rims. Will probably have to go back to the junkyard for a later Camry spare with the same size OD, but large enough ID.

Still seems funny, thinking about little things like luggage trim (I checked carpet fasteners last night, to make sure I have everything I need), when just last week I was still rebuilding intake manifolds and fuel systems.
 

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If you do decide to get the side luggage tray the hardboard cover will go over it but there's no indent or anything in the tray for the plastic bit attached to the hardboard to secure itself into, although in my experience it does stay in place even after a few slaloms lol. I keep a little 12V DC air pump there just in case. Never had to use it so I don't know how good it is but is always good to have for emergencies. It's also worth noting that the side trim will partially obscure some of the tray but it's still accessible, it becomes owner preference as to whether they want to cut out the trim covering the tray or not.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #273 (Edited)
The longer screws came today and so I was able to fit the front JBL speakers to my doors. Because these speakers are about 3/8" larger diameter than the stock 6" ones (both are called "6inch", or 6 1/2", or whatever, the industry is not real consistent on that size of speaker), the original speaker mounting plastic parts won't work. Someone here turned me on to Car-Speaker-Adaptors.Com, an awesome resource, who sold me a set for this car (the cost is also incredibly low). They are made of a kind of resin board, and are very well put together, and they fit perfectly:

the empty hole
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Fitted:
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To minimize the amount of water contacting the speakers, I wrapped electrical tape around the perimeter of the adaptor, to make it even more like the original spacer (the adaptors have small gaps between the vertical standoffs):
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Note that I used 10-24 x 1/2" stainless screws + nyloc nuts at each of the 4 corners. No rust and no risk of loosening.

Note that the original, 10mm long door mounting screws won't work with these 1/4" thick spacers added to the stack, and I didn't want to use wood screws in the resin grommets because their thread wouldn't be right (the original screws have a special plastic tapping "PT" thread designed for use in nylon grommets). So, I found 25mm long PT thread screws and they worked perfectly:
90159-60215

Note the wire harness connector on the JBL speakers wasn't the right shape to mate with my door harness, so I cut off the harness from the original speakers and butt spliced + heat shrink them to the new speaker wires so that they did.
 

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If I could make a suggestion for your speakers. Get some thin foam and put it between each layer. It will help dampen any possible rattles and provide a good cushion between each layer.
 

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How has foam technology advanced through the years? Only asking because my concern if I were putting foam in is that a decade or two down the line the foam degrades and turns into this sticky gunk, can be a bit annoying if you have to pull out the door trim to redo the fabric adhesive.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #276 (Edited)
foam is correct, it fills gaps around the perimeter and prevents rattles, and as you can see by the speakers in the photos above, was how they came from the factory originally (the ring of foam that you can see around its perimeter, and there is another layer on the other side, not visible in the photo)

the good thing is that foam compressed and not disturbed will last for a very long time, even as it ages

one thing to watch out for, is to make sure any foam getting wet is either closed cell, so it won't absorb water and cause rust, or if open cell, is compressed significantly so its cells are crushed enough to behave like closed cell (Toyota uses an extremely soft "EPT" foam for sealing that gets crushed 80~90%, for this reason, several pages ago, during the door assembly stage, I showed the part number for how you can buy a sheet of it from the dealer).

A few pages of this thread ago, you can see the photos of my 6x9 speaker install into the rear package tray, I wrapped a ring of foam around each layer to seal the perimeter of the speaker, to get the best possible bass response out of them. Since this area is dry I used simple hardware store foam.

Speakers need this seal, to separate the air moving at the back of them from the air moving out the front towards your ears from competing with each other. The simplest form of baffle is an infinite plane, with open front and back. The next best is a sealed box, like the trunk, but its quite difficult to seal these doors to make a sealed box. Sophisticated modern speakers seal the back and used CAE developed response tubes and internal baffles to turn that air pressure behind the speaker into something that adds to the front. But without very involved CAD design, trying to make this happen "by eye" is more likely to not work. So, I use the simple and trustworthy "infinite baffle" approach.

My plan with these door speakers is to add a ring of foam between the speaker face and the door trim panel. I'm not too concerned with the speaker x spacer, or the spacer x door seal because the main thing with a speaker is to acoustically isolate its front from its back, and that will be accomplished by the seal to the door trim. All of the other layers already have lots of holes in them (especially the steel door inner panel, which is nothing but holes). Unless I could seal all of those holes with something solid, there isn't much I could do about them.

Note that late model Toyotas are now using a hard resin door inner "water shield", its purpose is to improve the airbag sensor reaction time by a few milliseconds during side impact, by sealing the door cavity so the air pressure rise during side deformation will activate the g sensor quicker, but its very effective side effect is to improve the bass response of the door speakers, nice.

An old door like this Gen3, with its gigantic hole in the middle, and PVC "shower curtain" water shield, isn't going to do any favors for the door speaker's bass response (in other words, it'd be quite difficult to turn that into a sealed box). So, the main tool for helping them perform is to provide one complete, and rigid barrier between the face and the back of the speaker, and the best rigid, solid barrier in this door is the door trim.

As it turns out, that is in the dry area (the PVC shower curtain goes between the speaker adaptor and the door inner panel), so I will be able to use ordinary hardware store foam.
 

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You are entirely correct and I didn't realize you had used foam already. To help with the amount of holes doors have you could always use something like this:


They help a lot in terms of bass response and also help isolate the sound instead of it reverberating through the door panel or parcel shelf. I used these in a 86 Celica with small 4" speakers and they helped tremendously.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter #278 (Edited)
I will definitely look into that Boom Mat, to replace my worn and leaking PVC shower curtains water shields, because the wood fiber door trims need all the help they can get, to protect them from water.

For bass response, I'm planning a subwoofer in the spare tire, so am actually going to turn down the bass that goes through these door speakers, to give them more response in the rest of their range.

Just did some research into automotive door vapor shields (water shield, or "shower curtain") and learned some good things:

1) Oatey (or equivalent) shower pan liner is cheap, readily available and easy to work with, to make your own custom door water shields, the original ones are usually damaged by removal

2) butyl tape is also readily available at any hardware store, for bonding it to the door inner. all of the way around the perimeter, pay close attention to how the OEM water shield drained at the bottom, back into the door

3) either use butyl tape, or shower pan adhesive, to attach little overlapping pieces wherever you had to perforate the shield, for wire harness pass through, or inside handle rods/cables, and angle it so water will drain back out

4) do a water test to confirm your work (garden hose), before putting on the door trims, to make sure there are no leaks

Looks like I've got some work ahead of me on this.
 

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Discussion Starter #279
Repairing a lost weld nut when there is no access to the other side of the panel:

One of the M6 weld nuts on the front subframe, for holding the engine undercover fell off (bad weld from the factory). The frame is a closed section, so there's no way to weld in a nut if the original came off, so I replaced it with a RIV nut.
You can buy an expensive tool for this, or you can make your own:

Step 1, gather the parts. Note that an M6 fastener is pretty small and weak, so I used a 12.9 cap screw to get all the strength I could get. This is important because using this method, if the screw bends, the result will be crooked. Larger fasteners have more structural strength and the risk is less.
The lever is to hold the RIV nut still while you tighten the screw to collapse/rivet the RIV nut to the panel (I used a 6" long bracket from the hardware store, normally used for repairing fences and such).
The washers are to spread the load during this process. Oil them and the screw's threads.
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Here's the home made tool assembled. Note the RIV nut has serrations which will split and spread out to rivet it to the panel, when it is compressed by this process:
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Step 2, tighten the nut to the lever arm, and the RIV nut. Note there are extra threads of the screw sticking out at both ends.
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Step 3, Drill out the hole in the panel to accept the RIV nut (for these M6 ones I found a "T" sized bit was just large enough, without looseness around the nut, probably a common fractional sized bit would have been good enough).

Step 4, insert the RIV nut into the hole and hold the lever arm while you turn the screw:
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Turning the screw pulls/rivets the nut to the panel, holding the lever with the nut tight against it prevents the RIV nut from turning during this.

Just like popping popcorn, you have to sort of decide by yourself when you've gone far enough and stop there. Remove the "tool" and voila (you can see the line of other weld nut holes in this view, the RIV nut replacing the missing one is closest in this photo, ignore the two rubber grommets):

305562
 

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Cutting the vapor plastic is easy enough. The butyl is a pain to apply. Sticky and if you mess up it's a pain to adjust.
 
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