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Toyota Collector
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Hose clamp on the overflow line is not original.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter · #623 ·
DOH!

You are absolutely right (and eagle eyed). That radiator overflow hose from my car was cracked and failing. The hose from the parts car already had that wrong clamp on it, where it attaches to the radiator and the perforated worm clamp had "waffle ironed" a heavy shape into it. New hoses are NLA and its custom formed so I went ahead and kept that wrong clamp, just to cover the already damaged portion of it. :p


Norm
 

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Toyota Collector
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DOH!

You are absolutely right (and eagle eyed). That radiator overflow hose from my car was cracked and failing. The hose from the parts car already had that wrong clamp on it, where it attaches to the radiator and the perforated worm clamp had "waffle ironed" a heavy shape into it. New hoses are NLA and its custom formed so I went ahead and kept that wrong clamp, just to cover the already damaged portion of it. :p


Norm
I had to find SOMETHING your car is basically flawless and very likely the best example on the road. There was one other thing you forgot to restore to new condition but can't remember what it was I'll post if I spot it or remember.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter · #626 ·
"There was one other thing you forgot to restore to new condition" - the rear wheel bearings.
They seemed ok so I just went ahead and reused them (cutting corners, sloppy, sloppy work!).
 

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lol no it wasn't that, nothing wrong with keeping parts that are still fine. I sifted through some images (you deserve a medal for how many you posted) didn't find what I saw (maybe, maybe not) awhile back.
 

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experimental internet gas
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heh, I know a few people who thought the onion article was serious. Its satire only serves as testament to just how well built it is though.

edit: also while the individual hoses for the overflow bottle are NLA, the whole assembly itself is still available, 16470-62040. Kinda expensive though, ~50 AUD local pickup via Amayama. Mind you, that was actually cheaper than what I got it for directly through Toyota...
 

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1996 Camry LE
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In your recent picture of the engine compartment on the finished car I see a cover in front of the radiator with a hole for the hood latch. I have not seen one of these before.
Do you by any chance have a part #?
 

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500,000 + Miles
2000 Solara
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664 Posts
Just took a stroll through your restoration notes and photos and just finished up viewing the finished photos on p. 31. Gorgeous car and nice to know you have the old model reliability, styling, and simplicity in new condition. Many thanks for sharing your project and for your accumulated expertise that has and hopefully will continue to help us do-it-yourselfers here. I just hope some car manufacturers (and most important, the consumers) will begin to understand that the more gadgets, bells, and whistles you put on a car, the more weight, cost, and the less reliability due to the added connectors, wires, vacuum part, computer chips, relays and probably a host of other things that are there to fail some day. It took something like three years to do this restore...wonder how much time and $$ it would take to do a rebuild on one of the new models?

One of the simplest "computer" decisions my 2000 model makes for me, switching the HVAC source air to outside or inside drives me nuts. I just want it to stay where I last set it.

Great car, great thread norm
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter · #631 ·
Hi,
That part is called, "Seal, Radiator support upper", 53292-33010. It was only used until the end of '94MY.
The little clips are 90467-07117 (n=14)

It doesn't serve any real purpose, it is just a beauty cover. My SE never originally came with one, but I found one in a junkyard on a '94 and cleaned it up. Same as I did for the hood liner (SE didn't come with that either, I cleaned up and used a junkyard find).

In your recent picture of the engine compartment on the finished car I see a cover in front of the radiator with a hole for the hood latch. I have not seen one of these before.
Do you by any chance have a part #?
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter · #632 · (Edited)
The complexity vs. reliability challenge has probably been going on ever since they started adding front brakes in the '20s. The fact is that the first use of new ideas is always buggy, but once they become commonplace the result tends to work better than what had gone before. I remember the arguments against using plastics/resins in cars, all through the '70s and into the '80s ("You'll never be able to replace those once they wear out"). But, it turns out, restoring this car, the resin parts were all still as good as new, it was only the metal parts which were in such rough shape.
Same thing for the electronics, since this car has the early type OBD system on it, I was able to quickly and easily diagnose the faulty engine temp sensor and fix it in one go. Without that system it would have taken far more time to test every system until I found the one bad part. It was an extension of the hated/dreaded emissions regulations which at first were the worst things ever, and eventually became so vital to the incredible performance and reliability that automotive engines enjoy today.

Electronics keep moving forward in leaps and bounds. Now you can buy a universal engine ECU to replace a bad one that is far faster, and has more capability than what had come from the factory. The result being that not only can we pretty easily replace a bad ECU, but can get better performance as well.

In my case, my ECUs were all fine, so I didn't have go down that road, but was intrigued to see what was out there.

On the other hand, when the OEM makes decisions for you, in an effort to reduce the number of switches/controls in the otherwise overloaded interior, and those decisions are NOT what you want, then its really frustrating. THAT's what I love about this old car, and what you were talking about. :)


Just took a stroll through your restoration notes and photos and just finished up viewing the finished photos on p. 31. Gorgeous car and nice to know you have the old model reliability, styling, and simplicity in new condition. Many thanks for sharing your project and for your accumulated expertise that has and hopefully will continue to help us do-it-yourselfers here. I just hope some car manufacturers (and most important, the consumers) will begin to understand that the more gadgets, bells, and whistles you put on a car, the more weight, cost, and the less reliability due to the added connectors, wires, vacuum part, computer chips, relays and probably a host of other things that are there to fail some day. It took something like three years to do this restore...wonder how much time and $$ it would take to do a rebuild on one of the new models?

One of the simplest "computer" decisions my 2000 model makes for me, switching the HVAC source air to outside or inside drives me nuts. I just want it to stay where I last set it.

Great car, great thread norm
 

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500,000 + Miles
2000 Solara
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664 Posts
As much as I hate to admit it, you are mostly, if not completely, right about advancing technology. My own thoughts are partly based on watching my Dad in my younger years. He wouldn't have a car with electric windows if he could help it. Back then, they were almost guaranteed to fail...motor issues and hardware failure. Now they are so well built that they are wonderful to have. I do worry that new technology is close to pricing us out of the new car experience though. New technology comes at a price and even a plain vanilla pickup is crazy expensive and you can easily pay $60 thousand for a new SUV. Experts tell us that buying a new car is a terrible decision from a financial perspective.
I do wonder also if we are getting our money's worth in fuel economy. I think I mentioned this in another post recently but I had a '79 VW Rabbit that got 42mpg. Granted, it was diesel and it was a light-built, road-noisy car. I just wish all the newer technology 42 years later was giving us that kind of fuel economy.

Norm, I wondered in your rebuild sequence if you considered adding sound-reducing foil adhesive all over the floor and door panels for a quieter ride. You noted that Toyota put insulating panels at the lowest cost but best bang for the buck locations. Any recommendations or ideas on how much sound reduction one would get by removing rear and front seats and carpet and laying down sound barrier?
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter · #634 ·
"if you considered adding sound-reducing foil adhesive all over the floor and door panels for a quieter ride"

I did add insulation to the roof and the top of the cowl (inside of the engine room), but those were for heat reduction, rather than noise). I can't tell the difference while driving. Maybe in a hard rainstorm, while stopped, there'd be less sound through the roof?

I did add some dampening material around the spare tire well for the sub woofer.

The real source of wind noise is from the "press type" doors (the frame is stamped along with the rest of the door), much cheaper to make, but never sealed worth a darn at high speed (and the reason why most OEMs went back to frame type doors soon after). No amount of insulation would make a difference to that. New weatherstrips certainly never did (BTDT).

The rest of the noise comes through the glass, and unless one can find a custom glass shop who can make you thicker glass there's not much to do about that either (hybrid vehicles use a very special windshield with a noise damping PBT layer that helps with motor whine noise).

The rest of the interior was church quiet already (Toyota applied a great deal of double layer sheet steel with noise dampening layers in it, to this generation of Camry, all of it developed for the Lexus LS which launched just before it), so I didn't bother adding anything more, anywhere else.
 

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He wouldn't have a car with electric windows if he could help it. Back then, they were almost guaranteed to fail...motor issues and hardware failure. Now they are so well built that they are wonderful to have.
Personally I still won't, if only because it's really annoying not being able to wind the windows up or down when the car is off. That got real old real fast in my dad's 2018 camry. Plus the chiming when the door was open with the engine on, or when the window was ajar...dear lord the chiming.

New tech is great and it's crazy when you actually see the differences of 30 years (2018 3.5 V6 camry hits at least 260 whp) but it also means repairs are going to be that much more expensive when stuff does break, front or rear bumper might even total the car simply because the sensors in them cost so much.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter · #636 ·
"dear lord the chiming"

The chime is always the very first part to come out of any car I buy.
On the Gen3 that required a soldering iron.
On more modern Toyotas you can unplug it from the circuit board (simple and reversible).
 

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Start: 9/2018 I bought the donor car. 10/'18 I began disassembling.
Finish: 7/2021

3 years. There were two winters where work pretty much stopped for several months (ski season) and summer 2019 I stopped for 2 months out of frustration (ironically, it was because I was trying to figure out the AC plan!). Probably 24 months'ish if the gaps were removed.

I miss knowing what to do every day, "What will I do today? Continue working on the car!", and having the progress to continually re-assure me.
But, I don't miss having the 'burden' of the size of the project hanging over my head: the sheer quantity of projects necessary to get done, the size of all the stored parts (it is amazing how much space it takes up, and infuriating when you can't find a part that "HAS to be in this box!", but isn't), and the repeated "uh, oh" moments when I'd have to go and do a lot of research to figure out how to make my next move ("will this problem beat me, or me it?"). Finishing, at some point, becomes simply a matter of, "If I don't finish this it'll become a catastrophe." Each hurdle overcome buoyed me through the next one.

After a certain point there suddenly weren't so many projects that there was always something else I could work on whenever there was a delay for a part. From the beginning of this year work slowed several times simply because I needed a part and that took time to wait, and there wasn't anything else to make progress on.

It was nice back when 'everything was easy', because it was all taken apart and everything was easily accessible.
It is even nicer now, knowing that there weren't any BIG re-dos necessary (its fun building a car, its a DRAG re-building it again, and again, to keep on solving mistakes).

To be completely honest, though, I don't yet have even 1000 miles on it, so there's still opportunity for something to go wrong that hasn't showed up yet.

Norm
Well my friend, this will be my last post on this forum. I had some issues with some members giving false information and even more issues with really bad moderators on this site (Not BMR, he good). Once my ban was lifted this was the only thread I had interest in. Now that you are complete, I can leave.

My Celica restoration is also nearing completion and having teething problems like you did. I had to sort out my AC system since R12 is near impossible to get. Ended up retrofitting a late 90's R134a system instead. Installed a new radio but still have speakers to do. Car runs and drives fine but leaks a little oil, just gotta redo my valve cover, it's leaking from the half moons. And the rear parcel shelf I am rebuilding. Other than that, it's done completely.

Adios.
 
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Completed project:
View attachment 300921

Afterwards, slide the grommet back into position and tape it securely to the harness as original.

I took apart the RH door harness and all of its wires looked like new, I guess the driver's door extra number of cycles is what caused the cracking, not just age. Here's hoping the rest don't start cracking anytime soon.
Thanks for the guidance on post 164, on driver door harness R&R.
A hot weather day surely makes the problem appear worse ( => key turned in the door lock doesn't Lock successfully )
bentley2535
 

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That reminds me that I must also take a look at my left door as well...been having more or less this exact same problem with my front passenger door where the remote will almost never lock that door, but the key mostly works, although sometimes I still have to manually lock the door.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Discussion Starter · #640 · (Edited)
Here is an updated engine room photo now that I have remedied the incorrect hose clamp on the radiator overflow hose. :) (that's for you, 71Corolla)

Car Vehicle Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design


I dug out the spare hose from my original car, threw away the chewed up one that I'd used from the donor car. My original had a lot of rust on the rubber (which is why I didn't use it in the first place). I soaked the rubber in vinegar for 24 hours (the acid dissolves the iron oxide), and then washed it real well with soap and water. Rubber won't be affected by the acid. Then got new little wire clamps from Toyota (about $1.50 each) and now its as perfect as it can be!

I love how powerful this engine is, and how light this body is. Mated with a manual transmission it is so nimble and "squirt-able" in traffic. The handling is firm, but never harsh, even on badly chopped road surfaces (winter freeze/thaw cycle chop).

This week I drove it down to Toledo (about an hour away) to show it to the guys at the dealership who sold me all of the parts. They were very happy and had lots of great questions. I asked them if I'd get an award for how much money I spent with them and they said, "you are not even close to some of our bigger customers" (apparently there are folks who run their own repair businesses and buy their parts through this dealership).
 
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