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Hi All! My first time posting. Great place! I've learned a lot while spending time here.

A few months ago, I bought a '89 pickup, DLX extended cab 4X4 with the 3.0 V6 in it. The truck had been a California truck all 120K miles of its life.

I really love the truck, but I've noticed that the acceleration on it isn't nearly as quick as my 4-cylinder '06 Corolla - or any 4-cylinder I've ever driven. This just seems wrong. Question: Is it possible that whatever CA-mandated smog stuff is on there is severely impacting this engine's acceleration? If so, do you recommend taking the extra smog equipment out? And if you do recommend taking it out, is that a big job? The truck lives in AZ now. Other than the acceleration issue, the truck runs like a top, with a nice smooth idle.

Thanks!
 

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Bump your timing up a few degrees to see if that doesn't make a difference.
Thanks, TurboJim. I hadn't though of adjusting the timing. What's the trade-off? IS there a trade-off? Advancing the timing, if it works, will it improve the acceleration at the expense of what? Gas mileage? Engine wear? Thanks!

I removed all the smog related parts as I felt that lack of acceleration too and it did not help any. There is a reason they call it the 3.slow
BajaToyo - 3.SLOW? I've all-of-a-sudden got the sinking feeling that I just may have picked the wrong truck to buy. I had no idea that these 3.0 engines had a reputation. I should have done more homework before purchasing, obviously. So if removing the smog equipment gave you no joy, have you tried anything else? Appreciate the insight!
 

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Thanks, TurboJim. I hadn't though of adjusting the timing. What's the trade-off? IS there a trade-off? Advancing the timing, if it works, will it improve the acceleration at the expense of what? Gas mileage? Engine wear? Thanks!

One downside is that it might make it more difficult to pass an emissions test, but you could always adjust it back for that if need be. I think it might reduce the power in the upper RPM range.

From idle to the middle RPM range I think you'll find that the engine is more responsive with the timing advance a few degrees. I still use regular, no need to run premium for normal driving.

I don't think advancing the timing hurts fuel economy, if anything it might help a little. Probably not going to have a significant impact on engine wear one way or another.
 

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I will never believe anything that Toyota made before 99 would be unreliable. Those were golden years of reliability for H and T.
Now, you missing one simple fact. Whatever you get at the wheels goes through transmission and differential, right? If you have gears combination set to haul and tow, not to giddy up, that's what you get. Slow work horse. Change rear end gear ratio. Will pick up faster, be a gas guzzler and a slug at HWY speeds.
 

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Thank you, TurboJim. Understanding the ramifications of any changes I make is obviously important to me.

Does insufficiency in the upper RPA range mean that I would face challenges when passing on the freeway, compared to pre-advance?

The next big question is...how far do you advance it?
 

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I will never believe anything that Toyota made before 99 would be unreliable. Those were golden years of reliability for H and T.
Now, you missing one simple fact. Whatever you get at the wheels goes through transmission and differential, right? If you have gears combination set to haul and tow, not to giddy up, that's what you get. Slow work horse. Change rear end gear ratio. Will pick up faster, be a gas guzzler and a slug at HWY speeds.
[/QUOTEf

Ukrkoz: No argument on pre-ought reliability for Toyota. Can't speak for Honda.

Rear end gear ratio? Holy Crap. I remember changing out the differential in my '68 Galaxie. It was pretty easy, being that, after you disconnected the back U-Joint , you just unbolted it, pulled a couple of c-clips off the axles, and the whole differential assembly (Pinion, Ring Gears, and the Bearings) just pulled out from the front.

I suspect changing the gear ratio on this truck going to be a bit more complicated. Or did Ford figure out the right way to do it, and everyone else followed?

I'm sure I'm showing my ass here. But the truth is, what little car knowledge I have is, truly, awfully old.
 

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Thank you, TurboJim. Understanding the ramifications of any changes I make is obviously important to me.

Does insufficiency in the upper RPA range mean that I would face challenges when passing on the freeway, compared to pre-advance?

The next big question is...how far do you advance it?
In my 2WD 5-speed I can get into 5th gear as early as 40 mph. When shifting through the gears there is never a need to approach redline, the power peaks well before then.

I believe the factory ignition setting is 10 degrees below top dead center. Try 12-14 degrees. If the engine starts to ~ping~ then you know you've gone to far. Before you can set the timing the TPS must be working properly .

http://www.4crawler.com/4x4/CheapTricks/TPS/index.shtml

 
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