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2003 Highlander
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
2003 V6 AWD base.
Hi all, I've got a leaker....


Just spent last or hour or so looking at parts sites and no luck. Looks like Toyota does not list as a separate part. Wants to sell the whole rack.
These are the two little steel tubing lines that reside on the steering rack itself.
When I pull up a picture they are shown on the rack.
I'll attach a drawing see below. :surprise:
 

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Yeah that's going to be a hard part to find because they want to sell someone the whole rack. :bullshit2 Best of luck on your search. I looked for about 10 minutes and came up empty handed as well. You could always try a place that makes the hydraulic lines to order as well. I know there's a place up in my neck of the woods of Michigan called Applied Industrial Technologies that does stuff like that. Maybe you could pull them off, and ship them the old ones to have new ones made up ?



Here's that site for your reference.


https://www.applied.com/repair-rebuild
 

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Depending on the part, some parts are only a part of a whole part. That hydraulic line is more than likely only gonna come with the entire rack-and-pinion. You can maybe get a speed-shop or some other shop to make one for you. You will probably have to remove it first and give it to them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
nemeth and Vaugm25: Thanks for the follow up replies. VERY much appreciated. I found a local shop that can make up the lines. I'm tackling the removal tomorrow. Tight. Wish me luck. Yep the old gal is really starting to suffer from our Michigan-salt winters. I will post my struggles and some pics when finished. Haya.


nemeth: I checked the Applied web site and they show a Cleveland location. I assume there is one in Michigan from what you said. Can you let me know where the Michigan office is? I need a plan B. Thanks. :nerd:
 

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It used to be in Iron Mountain MI. which is the UP. Then they moved to the next town over named Kingsford, MI. I'm not positive that they do what you're looking to have done, but it's the only place I could think of that may do that kind of thing that I'm aware of besides a local fab shop. Any reputable local fabrication shop should be able to do it, but the Million dollar question is will they with the strict auto repair laws in Michigan ? Or the Liability it opens them up to ?



I'd think you'd be able to find someone to do it though, but be sure it's not going to be cost prohibitive to where you'd just be better off getting the new rack or sending your old one in through Rock Auto to Cardone to be rebuilt. New one is $247 or $288 with tax once the core is returned, and the rebuild service is around $279 with Cardone.



Best of luck on your endeavor.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It used to be in Iron Mountain MI. which is the UP. Then they moved to the next town over named Kingsford, MI. I'm not positive that they do what you're looking to have done, but it's the only place I could think of that may do that kind of thing that I'm aware of besides a local fab shop. Any reputable local fabrication shop should be able to do it, but the Million dollar question is will they with the strict auto repair laws in Michigan ? Or the Liability it opens them up to ?



I'd think you'd be able to find someone to do it though, but be sure it's not going to be cost prohibitive to where you'd just be better off getting the new rack or sending your old one in through Rock Auto to Cardone to be rebuilt. New one is $247 or $288 with tax once the core is returned, and the rebuild service is around $279 with Cardone.



Best of luck on your endeavor.

Holy cripes, I'm from da UP too eh. Perkins over just nort of Gladstone.....
Now down with dem trolls in GR. Haha. Nice to hear from a Yooper on The TN.:grin:
 

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Holy cripes, I'm from da UP too eh. Perkins over just nort of Gladstone.....
Now down with dem trolls in GR. Haha. Nice to hear from a Yooper on The TN.:grin:

Yeah I'm in Iron Mountain myself. The hell with the trolls. Those Fudgies would be better off staying south of our Bridge. LOL :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah I'm in Iron Mountain myself. The hell with the trolls. Those Fudgies would be better off staying south of our Bridge. LOL :grin:
Yep, I'm a longtime card-carrying member of the "bomb the bridge" movement.*
Can I say that anymore?


* please everyone.....no PC comments.....it's a long running joke. There is no such thing!
Haya....
 

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any u pick yards near you? or they want to sell only the whole rack?
Probably not in the UP. That's way too recent a development for the upper peninsula. They're stuck in the '50's. Pasties anyone?:grin:
I'd probably see if a speed shop or a hydraulic hose shop could just make one up. Nearest one might be in Detroit, GR, or maybe Lansing. Or head the other way and try Duluth or Green Bay. (Coldest winter I ever experienced was August in Green Bay.) BTW, the lake route to GB from Escanaba is a really nice drive. And it really is like going back in time. I worked for Schneider and spent a weekend shuttling trailer loads of paper rolls in the dead of winter. It was actually fun!
 

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How is it leaking, is the tube rusted/corroded out? Or is it just a fitting. I wonder if Camry parts are interchangeable? I looked at Ebay, no luck. Maybe one of the rebuilders listed on Rock might be able to source some parts. Or just bite the bullet and spend the bucks on a rebuilt rack.


I've been looking at the images that Rockauto has, they're a lot easier to see than the one you posted. Looks to me like those tubes might just be standard replacement brake line. You might be able to get those at a local auto parts store like NAPA and carefully bend them yourself. As long as you don't kink the line, you would be okay.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
How is it leaking, is the tube rusted/corroded out? Or is it just a fitting. I wonder if Camry parts are interchangeable? I looked at Ebay, no luck. Maybe one of the rebuilders listed on Rock might be able to source some parts. Or just bite the bullet and spend the bucks on a rebuilt rack.


I've been looking at the images that Rockauto has, they're a lot easier to see than the one you posted. Looks to me like those tubes might just be standard replacement brake line. You might be able to get those at a local auto parts store like NAPA and carefully bend them yourself. As long as you don't kink the line, you would be okay.

Thanks Brian. That's a good idea! I'm gonna check the local parts stores tomorrow. I actually have a tubing bender. And yes the line itself rusted through. Haya...
BTW-it rained again today so I did not get to it. I like to work outside 'cause the light is so much better than inside my garage. Sunny tomorrow according to Live TV 8 Radar Weather. Woohoo. It's been nothing but rain-rain-rain the last week or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Steering rack transfer lines fabbed and replaced

2003 V6 AWD 333K miles. Pictures posted below.
It took about an hour to remove the two rusted lines using a combination of a 12mm crowfoot, ratchet and a whole bunch of extensions. One of the lines actually broke during removal so we extracted the connector nut with a 12mm socket.
Auto Zone had the parts:
-2 NICOPP brake lines. Part No. CN-340. More on this tubing later.
-4 AGS Company Steel Nut. Part no. BLF-48C-5. Bubble flare fitting.
-2 AGS Company Brass Compression Fitting (Straight Coupling). Part no. CF-1
Total cost $32.
Fabbing the lines and installing took about 2.5 hours. Lots of finagling with cuss words flying. The steel nuts had straight threads so starting them in the corresponding bosses was difficult. The tubing had to be dead-straight into the fitting or it would bind. Not fun with the tight spaces involved.
Note in the photos the different look of the original Toyota flare fitting vs. the bubble flare fitting on the new NICOPP lines. The original is an intricate collar and flare arrangement that actually includes a tiny O-ring. Wow. It is not a common brake line configuration.
We went with 3/16 inch OD line for the simple reason the end flare fit the Toyota boss perfectly. Tubing of 6.5mm OD line size (same as original) would not fit, the ends were too big. The steel flare nuts worked perfectly too even though they look vastly different from the originals in the photos.
The reason for the compression coupling was the NICOPP brake lines had to be cut to be able to remove the original flare nuts and replace them with the AGS bubble flare nuts (M12 x 1.0). We rejoined the line with the compression coupling.
About the NICOPP tubing: This is some pretty special stuff. A nickel-copper-ferric alloy. Pressure rated same as steel brake lines. They say it does not rust! Soft. Like soft copper tubing. But resists kinking and can be formed by hand. The finished line in the photo was bent by hand. No tubing bender required.
Also please note the flare ends on the NICOPP lines. It's called a "bubble flare" we learned. We could have flared the cut ends of the tubing with a hand flare tool but opted to stay with the factory flare as it fit so well. Thus the compression couplings.


I want to give a shout-out to the guys at The Lowell Auto Zone for being so helpful. They took about 1/2 an hour out of their day to spend with my son Johnathan and I, discussing options and coming up with this solution. They are awesome.
Oh, yes. Thanks to my son Johnathan too. He worked his butt off helping me. :grin:
Photo captions left to right:
1. Ugly
2. Crow foot on Loooooong extension
3. New line, bent by hand
4. Original on top, new AGS bubble flare nut below it
5. Little extension needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Brian....great suggestion Dude. Thx. Yes, quite a bit of hard noodling on this one to come up with parts that fit. The guys at our local Auto Zone are true champs in my book. I've been in there lots of times and they always hear me out on my goofy ideas and help me with whatever fix is needed. I cannot say that about two or three other parts stores in the area. Those hun-yuks act like I'm disturbing their coffee break by walking into the store! Finest regards, Haya...:grin:
 

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I was thinking about when I learned about brake line stock. One of our family's 'kids cars' was a 1960 Opel Rekord. Looked like a miniature 54 Chevy. 4 cyl, 3 on the tree. It was truly a beater, I loved it. It had a rusted out brake line. Tried fixing it with a propane torch, acid flux, and solder. Wouldn't hold, and pumping brakes to get a stop sucks. Andy, the family friend down the street took me to the auto parts store and we bought brake line stock and hand bended it. Not easy to get the fittings lined up, as you found, they have to be perfectly aligned or you never get them started. But it fixed the brakes and the old post war sedan lived a bit longer. Not very old cars used to be such an adventure. Especially in S. Western Michigan.



That was 50 years ago. The car had become a rust bucket in only 9 years.
 

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I used that NiCopp stuff to replace that section of my power steering return line quite a few years ago. It has outlasted both the original part and one I bent out of standard brake line and still looks fine. This should be a permanent repair for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I used that NiCopp stuff to replace that section of my power steering return line quite a few years ago. It has outlasted both the original part and one I bent out of standard brake line and still looks fine. This should be a permanent repair for you.
Mgeorge: Cool. I wish I had heard about that NiCopp stuff sooner. It's a great substitute for those PS return lines that rust like nobody's business. I have replaced those twice now on my 16 year old HL. Oh... and easy to work with too. Haya....
 
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