Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts
W
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I need help to check whether the oxygen sensor is bad or not. Recently
I have check light on with P0420 code. After consulting with your guys
in this NG, I decided to check the post-oxygen sensor connectivity.
First I followed the steps descibed in Haynes repair manual, test the
oxygen sensor heater, it reads 14ohms which is between 11-17 ohms, the
book says that it is good. Then I tried to test the voltage at the
harness side between black and red wires(the book says black and pink
wires where there was no voltage existed), it read ~7V. The book says
that the voltage should be the battery voltage which is ~13V, my
question is what it means? Do I have a bad electrical connection
between the harness and oxygen sensor? Next, I did backprobe by
inserting a pin along the black wire at the back of the harness
connector, then started the engine, it run about 5min, I noticed
nothing(the book say that I should read 100-900 millivolts). I am
wondering whether I did wrong with the tests. Could someone point out
what I did wrong here? How could I make sure that the oxygen is bad
before go-ahead to have it replaced?
The other thing is: after I cancelled the OBD II code, it took over
2-months for the check light to come back, and I drive 60miles per day
to go to work. What happened here?
Thanks.
wm
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hi All,
>
> I need help to check whether the oxygen sensor is bad or not. Recently
> I have check light on with P0420 code. After consulting with your guys
> in this NG, I decided to check the post-oxygen sensor connectivity.
> First I followed the steps descibed in Haynes repair manual, test the
> oxygen sensor heater, it reads 14ohms which is between 11-17 ohms, the
> book says that it is good. Then I tried to test the voltage at the
> harness side between black and red wires(the book says black and pink
> wires where there was no voltage existed), it read ~7V. The book says
> that the voltage should be the battery voltage which is ~13V, my
> question is what it means? Do I have a bad electrical connection
> between the harness and oxygen sensor?


Without a wiring diagram, it is difficult to provide you with assistance,
especially if you are looking for the wire colors. Also, when you refer to
"post-oxygen sensor," I am assuming that you are referring to O2 sensor #2
which is located after the catalytic converter. Take a look at the color of
the wires to plug into the O2 sensor, paying attention to secondary or
"tracer" colors on the wires. Then, find those wires where they come into
the ECU. The voltages at the ECU should be the same as at the harness. If
they are not the same, then you have a bad connection somewhere, probably
due to a bent or loose pin in the connector.


Next, I did backprobe by
> inserting a pin along the black wire at the back of the harness
> connector, then started the engine, it run about 5min, I noticed
> nothing(the book say that I should read 100-900 millivolts). I am
> wondering whether I did wrong with the tests. Could someone point out
> what I did wrong here? How could I make sure that the oxygen is bad
> before go-ahead to have it replaced?


When you say that you did a backprobe, I am assuming that you were using a
digital volt meter and that it was set to the correctg range. Most likely,
the pin you used did not touch the pin in the connector. Try using a thick
sewing needle or thin nail to touch the pin in the connector and then
concnect your meter to the needle/nail.

The book should have a resistance value for the O2 sensor.

> The other thing is: after I cancelled the OBD II code, it took over
> 2-months for the check light to come back, and I drive 60miles per day
> to go to work. What happened here?
> Thanks.
> wm


If the O2 sensor is marginal buyt not failed completely, it often takes time
for a MIL to reappear.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
 
W
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Ray.
I did backprobe by using a pin and I measured the voltage between the
pin and the harness connector. It reads the same as the one without
pin(~7V) and I assumed that the pin did have the contact with connector
wire. I did use digital volt meter.
Anyway, next step, I tried to loose up the O2-sensor from pipe using a
O2-sensor socket. But, nothing. It was so tight that I was afraid to
break the threads if I had used brute-force. Is there anyway to loose
up the O2-sensor by applying WD-30, etc? The engine was cold though,
but still no help.
Wm
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Thanks Ray.
> I did backprobe by using a pin and I measured the voltage between the
> pin and the harness connector. It reads the same as the one without
> pin(~7V) and I assumed that the pin did have the contact with connector
> wire. I did use digital volt meter.
> Anyway, next step, I tried to loose up the O2-sensor from pipe using a
> O2-sensor socket. But, nothing. It was so tight that I was afraid to
> break the threads if I had used brute-force. Is there anyway to loose
> up the O2-sensor by applying WD-30, etc? The engine was cold though,
> but still no help.
> Wm
>


I was thinking about your original post. I don't remember what voltages you
were getting, but they should be in the 4 to 7 volt range.

As far as removing the old O2 sensor (or any threaded connector that is
stuck, spray with penetrating oil, then tap lightly with a hammer. Do this
once or twice a day until it loosens up. Working on a hot exhaust may be a
little easier.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top