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Howdy guys, recently began to get the p0401 code on my 1999 toyota camry (4 cylinder standard), and I'm already over inspection so I need to get this fixed quickly. Anyway I went through the diagnostics set out in Haynes manual and my egr valve holds vacuum, modulator seems to be fine. So I pinpointed it down to the vsv, got the car on blocks and for the life of me can barely see it, never mind unbolt it and get it out. Is there a special trick? There seems to be one bolt I could get off but I don't see any others. This is my first in depth repair like this so any help would be greatly appreciated! Theres not much for 4 cylinder tutorials on the web. Also my brake light has been on for the past 3 months even though brake fluid level is almost at max and emergency brake is down, any ideas?
 

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On my 5SFE it is attached to a small bracket which is held onto the back of the block by a single bolt. I found that the easiest way to access it was from the passenger side wheel well. You'll probably have to remove the plastic guard to gain access. The space is pretty limited so you probably won't be able to get your hand up there and look at the same time. Use a flashlight to locate the VSV and make a mental note of where it is before diving in and feeling around with your socket wrench - I'm pretty sure it's a 12mm bolt. Getting it bolted back on is even more enjoyable :)

Make sure to test the VSV to be sure it is faulty before replacing it. You should be testing for vacuum leakage, resistance of the coil, and proper functioning of the valve (should make a clicking sound signifying that the valve is opening when you apply 12 volts to the coil).
 

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抵抗は無駄で&#
2002 Solara SLE V6
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you need to have the car on jack stands and remove the passenger wheel and fender apron (piece of thick flat plastic) and get the access through there. there is no way to easily access it neither from bottom nor from top.
 

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And once removed maybe mount it back onto the firewall like a member did.
+1 that's kind of what i did except i had an extra bolt so I was able to mount it along side the old one and plug in the connector. No need to spend a lot of time trying to get the old one off.
 

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And once removed maybe mount it back onto the firewall like a member did.
Yea I thought about doing this. What in the hell were they thinking when they decided to throw the VSV down on the block? Perhaps they had a surplus of vacuum line? Or maybe they outsourced that part of the design to GM . . .
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wow, thanks a lot guys! Studying for midterms this week so I'm going to have to wait till the weekend (and make sure no cop sees my 3 month overdue sticker :rolleyes:) This is my first big car fix so lets hope it goes well, anyone have ideas why my brake light would be on? (even though my reservoir is full and emergency brake is down)
 

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I found that the easiest and quickest way to check the VSV solenoid is to check for vacuum at the EGR modulator.
Engine cold (No Vacuum), Engine at operating temperature (Vacuum)
That tells you that the Vacuum solenoid and Temperature sensor is working properly.

To check the EGR valve, put vacuum at the EGR hose end and the engine will run rough or completely died.
That tells you that the EGR valve is opening and the exhaust gas is flooding the intake manifold.

Art
 
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