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My daughter had a 2002 Toyota Camry LE 4cyl . Yesterday when she was driving it , it all of the sudden wouldn’t accelerate and the break pedal became very stiff . It’s had this acceleration problem for a bit and it’s obviously not safe . I’ve put over 700$ into it in the last 2 months , It has new breaks pads , rotors and a new caliper on the drivers side . The rotor also was very hot when this happened yesterday . I’m so tired of dealing with this and I just took it to a shop to have a diagnostic test done! Any ideas on what this could be ?
 

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I chased a similar problem on a 93 Mercury Sable. Kept getting a dragging caliper that would overheat the brakes. On that car it ended up the rubber flex lines from the body to the wheel had a metal clamp to hold it to the strut. They would rust and then constrict the flow of brake fluid so it couldn't release like is should.

Not sure this is the case but those are fairly inexpensive compared to other brake parts.
 

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As @Brad_G said, it is not at all unusual for old brake hoses to have all sorts of issues from literally swelling shut if there is a compromise between the carrier sleeve inside the tube and the hose itself, or something like he described.

If the fluid can get to the piston to activate it, but then is restricted from exiting via the return hose the brake will keep the brake on, not only making the car drag but creating tons of heat at the wheel(s) where it's happening and contribute to things like bearing failure.

It should definitely be checked, and if you think the brake hoses are original or don't know their age then just have them replaced and the system bled afterward. At 18 years old, almost 19, they're due.
 

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Agree with two posts regarding the rubber hoses between metal brake line and caliper. Replacing the hoses would not be terribly expensive. I had to do this for one of my cars. Not sure if this will provide relief as to acceleration problem. For poor acceleration that hose would have to be severely impacting the ability of the brakes to release when brake pedal pressure is released; i.e. that brake really has to be holding to keep the car from accelerating. Having said that, it would be quite a coincidence two have two separate problems like this occur at the same time.
 

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For poor acceleration that hose would have to be severely impacting the ability of the brakes to release when brake pedal pressure is released; i.e. that brake really has to be holding to keep the car from accelerating. Having said that, it would be quite a coincidence two have two separate problems like this occur at the same time.
Braking power virtually always exceeds accelerative power, even on the most powerful street cars--hence the phenomenon of the burnout--and a 2002 Camry is not a powerful car to begin with. So I agree with you that it's unlikely to be a coincidence (especially given the OP's comment about hot brakes), and may just be that severe of a hose issue. If the OP so inclined, you could install a set of stainless-steel brake lines from StopTech or other while you're in there (they run less than $100) for a firmer brake-pedal feel and more confident stopping.
 

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Braking power virtually always exceeds accelerative power,
Yep. It has to. The braking system on virtually any production car of the last 60 years or so was designed to be able to keep the car dead still even at full throttle or to stop a car stuck at full throttle.

Even one wheel of 4 "stuck on" to any significant extent will make acceleration seem quite laggy compared to normal.
 

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I would take it back to the shop who fixed it and have it inspected. It’s likely a stuck caliper as others have said. It seems like too much of a coincidence that you just had the brakes worked on. If you don’t trust them, take it to a second shop for diagnosis and then make the first shop pay for the repairs if they caused the issue. I’ve had to do that before.
 
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