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Ejo, I have a 2018 HiHy Ltd and drive mostly (~85%) highway to and from work and have been averaging between 30 - 32 MPG for the last month. I'm very pleased with my mileage so far! I would absolutely go with the hybrid version over the gas one.
As a current Hybrid owner I understand, but when you will look at the economics and not just environmental impact of it, the Hybrid is not a good deal for a low mileage user.
In order to make it easy say you drive 10K per year and get on average 7 miles more per gallon (30 over 23) that means you use 100 gallons less per year.
Let us say you pay an average of $3.50/gallon you would save $350.00 each year. If you drive the car say 8 years or even 10 years your savings never reaches your original investment. 10 x $350 or even $500 still won't cover the plus $5000 the Hybrid is over the regular Highlander. Now if gas prices reach the European numbers and the Hybrid cost difference stays the same I'll by an Hybrid over the regular immediately.

The numbers above are only based on gasoline consumption and do not include the higher insurance costs(due to higher value of car) and slightly higher maintenance costs. You might break even when driving 20K miles per year or more but in the 10K to 12K (US average) it is not a good deal.

Hey don't get me wrong, I love my HHL but for over a half 100 grand a regular HL will do fine for the next 10 years and I'll make sure I'll treat the environment better by driving my small 35mpg cars when I don't need a SUV.
 

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As a current Hybrid owner I understand, but when you will look at the economics and not just environmental impact of it, the Hybrid is not a good deal for a low mileage user.
In order to make it easy say you drive 10K per year and get on average 7 miles more per gallon (30 over 23) that means you use 100 gallons less per year.
Let us say you pay an average of $3.50/gallon you would save $350.00 each year. If you drive the car say 8 years or even 10 years your savings never reaches your original investment. 10 x $350 or even $500 still won't cover the plus $5000 the Hybrid is over the regular Highlander. Now if gas prices reach the European numbers and the Hybrid cost difference stays the same I'll by an Hybrid over the regular immediately.

The numbers above are only based on gasoline consumption and do not include the higher insurance costs(due to higher value of car) and slightly higher maintenance costs. You might break even when driving 20K miles per year or more but in the 10K to 12K (US average) it is not a good deal.

Hey don't get me wrong, I love my HHL but for over a half 100 grand a regular HL will do fine for the next 10 years and I'll make sure I'll treat the environment better by driving my small 35mpg cars when I don't need a SUV.
I think the price difference between a Limited AWD and a Limited hybrid is $1,620.

I have a Limited hybrid and since buying it, my average fuel economy is 27.3 MPG, according to my fuelly app. I probably drive about 60% city. I'm satisfied with my choice of the hybrid.
 

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yes it usually reads about 19.5mpg. it seems to be inching up i think it's at about 15 now after another day of driving it. it's still cold here so the battery doesn't engage much, as i've been told that the lg battery really only engages when the temp is warmer, i'm guessing mostly above 65-70 degrees. toyota really should not market these cars in cold climates, as had i known beforehand that the ambient air temperature made a difference i would never have purchased initially.
 

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I think the price difference between a Limited AWD and a Limited hybrid is $1,620.

I have a Limited hybrid and since buying it, my average fuel economy is 27.3 MPG, according to my fuelly app. I probably drive about 60% city. I'm satisfied with my choice of the hybrid.
I must buy it over where you live as I just priced each again and here it is $4,200 difference without any options (just Limited)
 

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yes it usually reads about 19.5mpg. it seems to be inching up i think it's at about 15 now after another day of driving it. it's still cold here so the battery doesn't engage much, as i've been told that the lg battery really only engages when the temp is warmer, i'm guessing mostly above 65-70 degrees. toyota really should not market these cars in cold climates, as had i known beforehand that the ambient air temperature made a difference i would never have purchased initially.

You are absolutely right that they shouldn't market them in cold weather climates as they become a regular Highlander. You can even use the extra torque for towing as the tow capacity is 1,500 lbs less than a regular highlander with the same 6 cylinder engines.
Here in Michigan my mileage sucks for 6 moths out of the year due to the cold.
 

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I must buy it over where you live as I just priced each again and here it is $4,200 difference without any options (just Limited)
Make sure you compare apples to apples. The hybrid is also AWD. According to Toyota's website, MSRP for the Limited AWD is 43,540. The Limited hybrid MSRP is 45,160.

Don't know about out the door prices where you live, but based on MSRP, there is a $1,620 difference.

Note that if you don't need AWD, the MSRP for a FWD Limited is $42,080, which is a $3,080 difference, which obviously changes the calculus.
 

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2018 HyHy Limited
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Hybrid Limited Premium MPG

Same pricing difference we observed here in Colorado for the hybrid vs non-hybrid. We estimate after 2 years of driving we'll make up the price difference due to the MPG increase vs non-hybrid. Similiar to member Shinytop we picked ours up April 30, have under 1000 miles and have averaged 33mpg. We drive with a feather touch and around the house can get away with battery power due to low posted speed limits. After a month of ownership the most entertaining aspect we have enjoyed is how many pedestrians never hear the car or hear it at the last moment and jump quickly with a surprised expression. Suppose most pedestrians will become more accustomed to quiet engines in the next 10-15 years.
 
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