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Camreee
'99 V6 Ghetto Mod Edition
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680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My EGR is deleted and this is the only code I have left that I can't seem to get to stay away.

Temp sensor has a 1/2w 10k Ohm resistor shoved into it and no code for exhaust temp.

I tried unbolting and taping down the egr sensor midway with no vacuum line plugged in so it was reading in voltage range; and then plugged in just the electrical connector. When the engine tries to open or close the valve it gets errors for insufficient flow or excessive flow because the value doesn't change cause the tape and no vacuum to move it.

I duct taped the entire EGR assembly to my intake plenum and plugged in the VSV line along with the electrical connector so it could actuate the valve; and I drop the P1410 code but the engine runs so rich it's constantly misfiring and sounds like a bad case of explosive exhaust diarrhea except when it leans out a bit under a ton of throttle or over 4500 rpm.

Is there some trick to getting rid of this code? Right now I just have my ACIS valve line looped to the EGR VSV plug and the engine runs nicely but I'd rather not have my CEL on if there is a way around this.
 

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I ran my 2000 for years with the EGR valve busted. It ran just fine until I started an engine swap. If teh light bugs you, remove the bulb and carry cheap code reader in your glove box. It's what I did...
 

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Camreee
'99 V6 Ghetto Mod Edition
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680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I ran my 2000 for years with the EGR valve busted. It ran just fine until I started an engine swap. If teh light bugs you, remove the bulb and carry cheap code reader in your glove box. It's what I did...
Yeah I mean I could do that but I still want to know immediately if it starts knocking or misfiring so a constantly illuminated CEL is preferable to no CEL bulb.

Just wondering if anyone knew a trick to get rid of this code using resistors or something.
 

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Premium Member
1991 Corolla DLX 4AFE, 1994 Camry LE 5SFE, 1995 Avalon XLS 1MZFE, 2004 Sienna XLE/LTD, 2011 Camry LE
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795 Posts
Yeah I mean I could do that but I still want to know immediately if it starts knocking or misfiring so a constantly illuminated CEL is preferable to no CEL bulb.

Just wondering if anyone knew a trick to get rid of this code using resistors or something.
The operation of the EGR system is dynamic and not static, so at various times and conditions your ECM is expecting to see changes. And you will not do that with “resistors.” Your “spoofing” (nobody in the automotive world calls it that) is actually causing you performance loss. The engineers at Toyota know far better than you how to achieve the greatest performance from their engines and removing the EGR system is not beneficial. Brand new OEM NOS parts can be had online for very reasonable prices and restore your engine to full performance.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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x2

The EGR (originally invented in the '50s by Ferrari as a way to increase ignition advance without detonation, was based on how the WWII warplanes had used water injection, but free and in an unlimited onboard supply). It worked but the controls available at that time were too crude to make it work consistently.

Today it is used by Toyota (and other OEMs) as a way to run a higher compression ratio, and advanced timing (both of which produce more power, and increase risk of detonation) than would have otherwise been possible. The ECU uses EGR as a "coolant" in the combustion chamber, and then retards the timing as necessary when the detonation sensors detect it to protect the engine during heavy load, etc.

The EGR was adopted widely in the '70s, first crudely to reduce NOx, then OEMs learned how to use it like Ferrari had set out to do, for greater power, successfully once sophisticated ECU controls were available.
 

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Camreee
'99 V6 Ghetto Mod Edition
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680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If EGR is a net performance gain why would it be designed to stop during hard acceleration or above mid range rpms?

It might be a volumetric efficiency gain under partial throttle but that wouldn't make sense to close it under maximum load if that performance benefit applied in all cases and didn't have a limit.
 

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1991 Corolla DLX 4AFE, 1994 Camry LE 5SFE, 1995 Avalon XLS 1MZFE, 2004 Sienna XLE/LTD, 2011 Camry LE
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If EGR is a net performance gain why would it be designed to stop during hard acceleration or above mid range rpms?

It might be a volumetric efficiency gain under partial throttle but that wouldn't make sense to close it under maximum load if that performance benefit applied in all cases and didn't have a limit.
Modern engineering design called primarily for NOx emissions reductions as part of California’s mandate to reduce SMOG in the 1970’s. It all started in Cali back then, and I remember huge “smog pumps” when, right after DMV inspections, we’d immediately gut them, because they caused such a huge loss in engine performance. Toyota specifically recirculates gasses only when the engine is above 127°F AND below 4,400 RPM as this provides the best compromise between engine performance AND NOx, CO and HC emissions reduction that’s being fed into the 3-way Catalyst. The TWC functions to convert pollutant gases into relatively inert gases such as CO2, N2 and H2O. It’s not all just about the power. VVT was also engineered in mostly starting around 2000 as a way to increase low end performance as well as allow for excellent fuel economy. So as it stands today, that’s the best that can economically be engineered into our personal cars, allowing for both power and excellent fuel economy with 4 and 6 cylinder engines. From the 30’s to the 90’s powerful engines were almost exclusively 8, 10 and even 12 cylinder engines, and the power to weight ratio suffered significantly as a result.
 

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Camreee
'99 V6 Ghetto Mod Edition
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680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Modern engineering design called primarily for NOx emissions reductions as part of California’s mandate to reduce SMOG in the 1970’s. It all started in Cali back then, and I remember huge “smog pumps” when, right after DMV inspections, we’d immediately gut them, because they caused such a huge loss in engine performance. Toyota specifically recirculates gasses only when the engine is above 127°F AND below 4,400 RPM as this provides the best compromise between engine performance AND NOx, CO and HC emissions reduction that’s being fed into the 3-way Catalyst. The TWC functions to convert pollutant gases into relatively inert gases such as CO2, N2 and H2O. It’s not all just about the power. VVT was also engineered in mostly starting around 2000 as a way to increase low end performance as well as allow for excellent fuel economy. So as it stands today, that’s the best that can economically be engineered into our personal cars, allowing for both power and excellent fuel economy with 4 and 6 cylinder engines. From the 30’s to the 90’s powerful engines were almost exclusively 8, 10 and even 12 cylinder engines, and the power to weight ratio suffered as a result.
I know what it's designed for, I just don't care about what it does.

I removed it to reduce carbon build up in my intake and because it's one more thing that can potentially slow down wide open throttle -> wheel torque response time.

Fuel economy is fine; power is better than stock; emissions are something I'll worry about when the rest of the world forces companies to stop doing 90% of it.

I'm just trying to turn off my CEL dude.
 

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Camreee
'99 V6 Ghetto Mod Edition
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680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah, I believe it was already mentioned, yank yer bulb! Dude.
That's one option; I'll have to keep looking to see if I can find another way.

Sorry for being snippy.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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"carbon buildup in the intake" gets said often, but in my own limited experience with a '93 with 200k miles on it that I'd owned since new, and with no particular care other than fluid and filter changes, when I rebuilt the motor (probably with the original PCV valve still on it) the inside of the intake was dirty but in no way restricted or otherwise indicating that any excess amount of exhaust was ever present inside of it, and the cleaning was very rudimentary (merely a wipe down with brake cleaner made the inside look like new again).
 

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Seems like the 3vz egr system was much cleaner than the 1mz, apparently the 1mz egr gets fouled up quite badly, at least compared to the 3vz. I managed to get a look inside my upper intake chamber when I was pulling off my dizzy cap two weeks back and while it had soot/carbon inside, it was still rather clean for 25 years. I could probably just seafoam it all off.
 

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Conceptually you could do something like that to spoof the movement of the EGR position sensor as the EGR control signal changes. You'd have to play around with the part values until you got an output that would match the movement of the valve. You can get the 5 volts at VC and ground from E2.

20210719_074228.jpg

I never tried this since I didn't notice any side effects from having the EGR blocked off and the sensors unplugged. My concern with making the ECU think the EGR was actually working is that it would start adding spark advance when it thought there was EGR flow and cause knocking. Then I think you'd really get that hesitation from part throttle to full throttle as the knock retard decays.

Time for a standalone!
 

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As steve108 explained, if you "spoof" the ECU into thinking EGR is working, you will be on the road to engine damage. That's why I'm not planning to touch EGR in my racecar until I go standalone.
Properly disabling EGR would require removing it either from software coding, or desoldering components from the ECU that are responsible for it to disable it rather than just spoof the CEL.
I don't know if you've heard, but Toyota ECU's are notoriously difficult to reprogram for a variety of reasons. Nobody is doing it for 1MZ as far as I'm aware.

Another option to look into would be JDM ECU. Don't know about 1MZ, but at least 3S JDM engines came EGR-less from factory. If same is the case for 1MZ, then swapping over to JDM brains might solve that problem (and bring a host of others in return).

EDIT: Also, are you sure the carbon build up is due to EGR and not lack of PCV catch can?
 

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Camreee
'99 V6 Ghetto Mod Edition
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680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yeah I think you guys are right about this not being possible on the stock ECU. It's fine with the connector unplugged because the ECU doesn't even try to use it, but when I connect the EGR sensor to vacuum and plug it in that's another story.

Doing that it's operating as it would be if I found a way to regulate the voltage like it is with vacuum. The ECU has both banks at +50 ltft +20 stft from 800rpm-4400rpm instead of 0+-5%, and the ignition timing goes to crap and I end up with spark knock and an unreal amount of misfires. Result is slow car, unhappy bearings, and probably more gas burning in the headers than in the cylinders.

I hear ya with the 1MZ ecu not being tunable, I asked a few shops and they said they won't even touch OBD2 Toyota ECUs because the tunes almost always just end up being reverted by the ecu and not always properly.

Guess I'll stick with the code and a functional engine for now.






.
 

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Block the EGR inlet passage at the plenum by installing a small metal blocking plate in place of the EGR gasket. Problem solved, no CEL. No need to spoof anything.

My 1MZ-FE (99 Camry 200K miles) EGR valve to plenum passage was completely clogged up, but I didn't know about that till I removed the EGR valve to remove the plenum to replace the rear valve cover gasket at 180K miles. See picture. No CEL. The only negatives were a reduction in power from the resulting knock sensor induced retardation and a loss in fuel economy from a lack of inert gases in the intake. I had not noticed either and it sounds like you are OK with both.

Post cleaning of the plenum, I noticed a significant increase in power while cruising at moderate rpm. The EGR valve starts to open about 1,800 rpm, is fully open around 2,000 rpm (5 inHg EGR vacuum) and is fully closed at about 2,500. At higher rpm, there is no EGR and no performance degradation.

Plenum cleaning 1.jpg
 
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