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1995 Camry LE 4 cylinder

My ignition lock is dying on me, how do I remove it ? I tried doing a search here but I got so many random hits and none were detailed. can someone point me towards a thread detailing the removal procedure ?

thanks
 

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セクシーの定&#
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Is this a gen 3 or 4?

On my Gen2, you need to remove the lower covers and panels around the steering wheel (bottom first(right above where your shins are, then the steering column cover). After that you will see the lock cylinder and it's held on by 2 shear bolts (heads snap off when correct torque is reached at the factory). It's a bit awkward, but you can use a rotary hand tool with a cutting disc (really small, about 1.5cm in diameter) and cut slots into it so that you can screw the studs? (don't know that name, but a bolt, but with no hex head). But try using a chisel and mallet and see if you can put a slot in it like that.

If not, you could take the whole steering shaft out and drill off the head so it no longer holds on the shoulder.

Like i said, this was on my Gen 2 and may vary differently with your Camry.
 

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If you are just replacing the lock cylinder, which is usually the problem, you just need to take the lower cover off, turn the key to the 'access' position, then push the lock pin through the hole in the ignition lock cylinder housing and the lock cylinder should come out.

N.E.O.
 

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If you are just replacing the lock cylinder, which is usually the problem, you just need to take the lower cover off, turn the key to the 'access' position, then push the lock pin through the hole in the ignition lock cylinder housing and the lock cylinder should come out.

N.E.O.
What do you do when you have a key broken off in the switch and can not turn the key to the access position??? Please help...
 

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deviate from the absolute
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look on the bottom of the column, there is a small metal pin that locks the cylinder in place when you turn the key, drill it out and it will slide out....It happened to my camry and tacoma......you'll need a pair of needle nose pliers to start it after, to turn the tab portion of the cylinder
 

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Will not turn any further

This morning when I first tried to turn key it would only go to acc while steering column was unlocked...well my ex father inlaw when he tried to turn key he locked the steering wheel. since then the key OEM or new replacement didn't go all the way in cylinder using a rubber mallet it was pushed in...now key goes in but will not turn...what is the the possible issue?:headbang::headbang::headbang:
 

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1997 Toyota Camry Key Wont turn, Ignition Lock problem -1997 toyota camry FIXED!!! I see a lot of Douches with a capital D trying to charge people to fix this extremely common issue with this Camry ignition cylinder. OK pull the plastic guard off encasing the steering column. Get a phillips head screwdriver and remove the 2 screws holding the little off-white connector at the rear of the module(it has the wires to the ignition running to it). Get a pair of pliers or a small crescent wrench and while trying to turn the key use the wrench to turn the little rod sticking out of the back of the module. Make sure your turning it WITH the direction the key is trying to turn it. It should immediate be freed. Wala IT WORKS! AND THATS WHY PEOPLE DONT TRUST MECHANICS! HOW CAN YOU CHARGE SOMEONE FOR THAT INFO?
 

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1995 Camry LE 4 cylinder

My ignition lock is dying on me, how do I remove it ? I tried doing a search here but I got so many random hits and none were detailed. can someone point me towards a thread detailing the removal procedure ?

thanks
Since I recently had to tackle this for a friend whose key was not turning in the cylinder, I decided to take some pics of the process to make it easier for the next guy...

Remove the black bolt above the dead pedal to remove the cover next to driver's left foot. This must be removed to get at other screws that need to be removed.


To remove the plastic knee panel below the steering wheel, you will need to remove the hood latch mechanism that is mounted to it. Start by removing the two screws shown:


Pull the hood latch mechanism out so that you can get to the cable:


Remove the cable by rotating the cable in the handle so that the cylinder at the end of the cable can be rotated and the cable slid sideways through the handle:



Remove the screw on the lower right corner of the knee panel:


Once you have the lower knee panel off, you must also remove the metal bracket behind it that holds the OBD-II connector. There are 5 screws holding this panel in place (not shown), all fairly easy to find. Here is the OBD-II connector mounted to the metal panel. It can be removed from the panel by pressing the clips on the sides:


Now you can remove the cover around the ignition switch by pulling it away from the dash and popping the two clips out of the dash.


Remove the light ring from around the key cylinder by removing one screw at the bottom:


The screw can be better seen in this pic with the light ring removed:


Now you can remove the key cylinder by pressing a small shaft into the hole at the bottom of the key cylinder. The key must be in the ACC position:


If you can't get the key to turn to ACC position, you may have to get access to the back of the cylinder to turn the key shaft. By crawling upside-down under the dash, you will see the plastic switch assembly screwed to the back of the key cylinder:


By removing two screws and unclipping a few of the attached connectors, you will be able to remove the switch and see the end of the key shaft:


A pair of needle-nose pliers can then be used to gently assist turning the key to the ACC position, and press the release button on the bottom of the cylinder as shown in the photo above.

Here's a pic of the key cylinder being removed from the housing:


...and a view down the empty housing:


Once I had the key cylinder out, the next decision was to replace or repair. Replacing with a new cylinder was complicated by the fact that this Camry came with a chipped key. Changing the cylinder meant getting a new chipped key and spending another $80 at the Toyota dealer to get it programmed to the VIN. Getting a non-chipped cylinder would work, but the owner would have to keep the chipped key and press it against the non-chipped key while starting the car to satisfy the transponder.

What we came up with (at the suggestion of the Toyota parts guy, no less) was to take the cylinder to a locksmith, where he rebuilt the cylinder with new tumblers, for about $30. Problem solved!

Put it all back together in about 30 mins, good as new!

Steve
 

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This post is so old but I just had the locksmith repair my ignition lock cylinder so I thought I'd add my two cents. The Toyota lock cylinder uses split wafers which can bend, break, and bind keeping the cylinder from turning in the barrel. Good locksmiths are so familiar with the problem with this type of lock that they can correct the problem in about an hour if you bring them the lock cylinder and your key.
$23.50 + tax
PS: I can easily remove the "undamaged" lock cylinder by prying the plastic trim cover that surrounds the key switch off (taking care to pry at the upper left and lower right corners), then remove the screw that holds the lighted ring and move the ring out of the way. Turn the key to ACC and use a bent coat hanger to push in the securing pin. Pull the cylinder out with the key. Way too easy.
 

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^ What year and model is your car?
I was having ignition problems... no crank ... no lights ... the local locksmith told me that the key was worn. However, after some time ... 2 or 3 years actually... had elapsed ... the reason that the ignition switch wasn't working turned out to be because the neutral safety switch needed overhauling ... There is a DIY at the top of the forum page on how to do this ...
 

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This post is so old but I just had the locksmith repair my ignition lock cylinder so I thought I'd add my two cents. The Toyota lock cylinder uses split wafers which can bend, break, and bind keeping the cylinder from turning in the barrel. Good locksmiths are so familiar with the problem with this type of lock that they can correct the problem in about an hour if you bring them the lock cylinder and your key.
$23.50 + tax
PS: I can easily remove the "undamaged" lock cylinder by prying the plastic trim cover that surrounds the key switch off (taking care to pry at the upper left and lower right corners), then remove the screw that holds the lighted ring and move the ring out of the way. Turn the key to ACC and use a bent coat hanger to push in the securing pin. Pull the cylinder out with the key. Way too easy.
This is actually the correct way to remove the ignition cylinder.
 

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I had the same problem with my 97 Camry. Managed to get it to ACC and take the cylinder out and get it repaired at a locksmith.

I have been starting the car with needle nose plyers while I waited for the fix. Now, I can't get it to go back in. I turn the switch and the key to the ACC position, and it slides almost all the way down, but it is a few mm away from clicking in the notch. Without the spring being depressed, I can't turn the key out of ACC.

Any tricks? I must be missing something. What is the purpose of the gold rod running along the top?
 

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Everything good until I tried pulling the cylinder out

This post is so old but I just had the locksmith repair my ignition lock cylinder so I thought I'd add my two cents. The Toyota lock cylinder uses split wafers which can bend, break, and bind keeping the cylinder from turning in the barrel. Good locksmiths are so familiar with the problem with this type of lock that they can correct the problem in about an hour if you bring them the lock cylinder and your key.
$23.50 + tax
PS: I can easily remove the "undamaged" lock cylinder by prying the plastic trim cover that surrounds the key switch off (taking care to pry at the upper left and lower right corners), then remove the screw that holds the lighted ring and move the ring out of the way. Turn the key to ACC and use a bent coat hanger to push in the securing pin. Pull the cylinder out with the key. Way too easy.
I couldn't find anything about this in the factory manual. The Haynes manual does not say anything about releasing the illumination ring. It appears that on my 1996 LE auto that the illumination ring screws are not reachable without removing the entire dash anyway.:frown:

It just says to take off the lower shroud, take off the front switch cover, put the key into the ACC position, push in the release and the lock cylinder will come out. All that was great until I tried to pull it out and it won't come out. It barely wiggles. It doesn't appear that the illumination ring has anything to do with it not sliding out but it might. Thoughts?
 

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The Toyota lock cylinder uses split wafers which can bend, break, and bind keeping the cylinder from turning in the barrel.
My ignition cylinder seized out of of the blue one day in a parking lot. 100% seized and couldn't turn at all with no warning signs at all.

Luckily found a cheap locksmith to come out and rip it out without damaging the steering column and start the car.

Weirdest thing I've ever seen, but I guess one of the wafers suddenly sheared and completely jammed the locking mechanism. Pro locksmith spent almost an hour trying to extract it.
 

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Remove lower dash

My ignition cylinder seized out of of the blue one day in a parking lot. 100% seized and couldn't turn at all with no warning signs at all.

Luckily found a cheap locksmith to come out and rip it out without damaging the steering column and start the car.

Weirdest thing I've ever seen, but I guess one of the wafers suddenly sheared and completely jammed the locking mechanism. Pro locksmith spent almost an hour trying to extract it.
Not sure what year your car is but the lock cylinder on my 1996 wasn't that hard to get to. Just a few bolts and metal screws in the lower kick plate under the dash and a cover ring about the ignition lock ... about five minutes work. It turned out that the illumination ring was pretty easy to get out too. It just had a couple molded clasps that allowed it to pop out. The Haynes manual didn't show any of that however.

I had a really good locksmith fix mine. He took the lock apart and removed the split wafers completely which he said causes about 90% of the problems with those locks anyway. The wafers only keep people from picking the lock but car thieves don't mess with picking the lock anyway. They just pop out the entire cylinder with a special tool. He lubed it and also made two new keys for us. The Axxess keys we had made at Home Depot were also making the lock work poorly. He told me those are terrible keys. The big box stores offer them but they almost never calibrate the machines and they are never any good. Now the key works great and they work great in the doors too.

If you need a locksmith in Colorado, call this guy. His name is David Seel, his company is All in 1 Security and his number is 303-953-0664. Top drawer guy who really knows his stuff and he's available 24/7/365.
 

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Not sure what year your car is but the lock cylinder on my 1996 wasn't that hard to get to. Just a few bolts and metal screws in the lower kick plate under the dash and a cover ring about the ignition lock ... about five minutes work. It turned out that the illumination ring was pretty easy to get out too. It just had a couple molded clasps that allowed it to pop out. The Haynes manual didn't show any of that however.
In order to remove the cylinder the key must be turned to the ACC position. If its seized in another position (mine was in off), the only way to remove the cylinder is to forcefully rotate it or drill it out.

But, yes, under normal circumstances swapping out the cylinder is a breeze.
 
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