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I Love Priuses
1999 Toyota Camry LE
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339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, it's finally winter in Vermont. Just today it snowed over 5 inches in my town (and still had school, for crying out loud). Anyways, I was curious as to how you warm up your engine. Do you start it and just let it idle until it's warmed up? Or do you turn the car on and immediately start driving it cautiously?

I mostly turn the car on and drive off after ten seconds of idling or so. But since it's been getting a lot colder out I've been leaving the vehicle idling just so I have heat when I'm driving.

On a side-note: If I need to have the car idling to warm it up, would putting the car in D and holding the foot brake allow the engine and the transmission to warm up, and if so, would the car heat up faster or slower? :whatthe:
 

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81 celica
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73 Posts
i always let the car idle for awhile before i start driving it.

during winter up here in Alaska ill let it warm up for a minumum of 10 minutes which offen times isnt long enough especially when its usually -20F to -50F and colder out.sometimes ill let it sit at idle for hours during winter, which is normal for up here.

all my cars are winterized.
 

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98 Camry XLE V6
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3,116 Posts
I wouldnt worry about the tranny too much since its just a camry(sedan). Typically you should let ur car idle till the rpm's drop down a bit. So if its idling at 1,800rpm let it go down to maybe 1200-1400 RPMs. Thats pretty good already. Or take a look at the temp gauge and once u see it raises to the bottom of the cold line then you are able to drive off. Just be easy till you reach the proper rpms.
 

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Midship Captain
1991 MR2 Turbo
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1,643 Posts
I have a remote starter, and i allow it to run for about 10 minutes while i get ready to leave in the mornings. After about 5 minutes the car is warmed up enough that the heat radiates from the vents quite nicley
 

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I Love Priuses
1999 Toyota Camry LE
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339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Remote car starters are available at Wal*Mart, but I am not good at things that involve car wires. And knowing Dad he'd probably say "Oh, I'll install it" and then give up a couple months later because the instructions aren't detailed enough :rolleyes: And then of course another two weeks would be from him ranting that "we don't need no :censor:damn mechanic to do it for us. Do you know how much they charge for labor?" :lol:

I've learned that if you need a mechanic to do something to your car, go ahead and let them do it. But don't let Dad know until it's been done. ;)
 

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5M-GE
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2,901 Posts
If there's snow/ice on the car, I'll let it idle for the time I'm clearing snow off of it. If there's nothing, then I'll let idle for 30 seconds to a minute if it's cold out. 10 seconds for warmer outdoor temps. Basically enough to get fluids moving around.


Under either circumstance, I keep under ~2000rpm (KA24DE love, right, Razo? :woot: ) until the car reaches full operating temp. I'm not a leadfoot, so it's not hard for me to do.



edit: Both mom's KA24 Altima and dad's Bonneville have Bulldog remote starters - of the cheap Wal-Mart variety :rolleyes: My dad installed them both himself. They were $99 (or less, I forget), keep in mind Canadian pricing. They work, but let's just say that you get what you pay for. The Altima has a long crank time relative to other cars, and the Bulldog system will often not catch on the first try. Crank-crank *silence*. Crank-crank vroooooooom!


The Cressida had an AstroStart system that we got (installed) as a straight-up trade for a running, road-worthy '86 VW Jetta as a parts car. That was GOOD shit. And the remote made such cool noises when you pressed the buttons :loove:
 

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New 2006 Corolla LE owner
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1,209 Posts
get in the car, turn it on, turn heat on, turn radio on, buckle up, put in drive and go. After 5 minutes of driving its just about fully warmed up.

NOTE: I live in the south so it does not take long to warm up, even in 30 degrees.
 

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Toyota Fanboy
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4,486 Posts
I let my truck warm-up untill it comes down off of fast idle. Once the revs drop to 1,000 rpm (usually 10 seconds or less), I put it into "D" are drive off at a conservative pace.
Lengthy warm-up times are unneccsary and waste gas.
 

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132 Posts
when there is snow, any temp. :
start car, sweep off snow, fishtail outta parking lot, keep revs below 4000 for the first mile

no snow with snow on ground around freezing :
start car, wait 30s-1min, fishtail outta parking lot, keep revs below 4000 for first mile

no snow, much below freezing, (-15)-(-20) celcius, :
start car, wait 1-2 mins, ease outta parking lot, keep revs below 4000 for 2-3 miles
 

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since 1996
05 Impreza RS 2.5
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1,772 Posts
I just start the car and go. It eventualy warms up as I'm driving.
 

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TN Member
Prius
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5,461 Posts
I just drive it with a light foot til it's warm. The Prius has a thermos that stores hot coolant so engine warm up times are much shorter.

How come you guys in the colder regions don't use engine block heaters, isn't that more efficient?
 

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TN Pussy Man
Camry
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13,302 Posts
^ probably, but it's not like electricity is cheap these days either :p:

but I think it's more the convenient factor....remote starter-press a button, any time, whenever, whereever, etc- plus you can make all your lights ligh up when you want it to...


I have a remote starter.....and I'm spoiled since my car stays in the garage anyway... ;)
 

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Midship Captain
1991 MR2 Turbo
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1,643 Posts
epinionator89 said:
Remote car starters are available at Wal*Mart, but I am not good at things that involve car wires. And knowing Dad he'd probably say "Oh, I'll install it" and then give up a couple months later because the instructions aren't detailed enough :rolleyes: And then of course another two weeks would be from him ranting that "we don't need no :censor:damn mechanic to do it for us. Do you know how much they charge for labor?" :lol:

I've learned that if you need a mechanic to do something to your car, go ahead and let them do it. But don't let Dad know until it's been done. ;)
I install remote starters professionally, its my living ;)
 

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Registered
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1,663 Posts
when i wake up run out side in my pjs , start car hearter on full and then when iam ready to leave like 10-25 later cars warm
 

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How hard can it be?
2006 Pontiac G6 GT
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2,614 Posts
Tideland Prius said:
How come you guys in the colder regions don't use engine block heaters, isn't that more efficient?

If i parked outside or it was really cold, i'd use one. How much do they run?
 

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81 celica
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73 Posts
BlueFusion6851 said:
If i parked outside or it was really cold, i'd use one. How much do they run?
about $20-30 for a engine block heater, about the same with oil pan,battery,purculater etc. heaters

their easy to put in too. most of the time they only need to be plugged in for about 30 minutes to an hour at most.

a few winters ago the power went out when it was -55F out and my car froze solid, the dip stick was frozen and i couldnt even get it out :p so i had to lite a pizza pan with bbq charcole underneath the car for an hour just to get it started. took another hour for the tranny and other parts to thaw out too :(

i Hate Alaska
 

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I lived in Colorado for 7 years. I parked my car outside all those years & hated scraping the ice off the windshield every winter. I moved to Washington state about 9 years ago.

The smartest thing I did was to buy a house with a garage. My car has always been parked inside for the last 9 years.

Even when it's cold (like 20-30 degrees) outside, the garage is still aboug 45-50 degrees F.
No matter if it's winter or summer, I start my car, let it roll down the driveway in Neutral and after about 20-30 seconds, I put it in drive and I am off. I drive the car very gently till the temp needle is above "C". Then I drive normally.

When I park the car outside (like when I park it at work), I usually let the car idle about 30-sec to a minute, then I creep along in Drive till it warms up.

When I lived in Colorado, I usually had to let the car warm up for awhile before I could drive off. Both cars I had back then (80 Celica and '85 Accord) had carburetors and it drove like crap before it warmed up when it was below 20F outside.

So I start the car, get my snow brush out, brush off/scrape all the snow from the windshield, side/back windows and brush off the snow from the body. Then I'd creep along slowly and then the car would warm up.
 

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Camry 2002 V6
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171 Posts
Hey any of you guys notice it takes longer for your car to heat up with an intake on? On my camry there was a flap in the stock intake path, just after scope, is it supposed to cut air back and make the air fuel mixture richer with fuel so it heats up quicker? Is this what that does?
 

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Mitsubishi Diamante Owner
'03 Diamante
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1,743 Posts
/\ Yes on my Camry when I installed my short ram intake it did take longer for it to idle down

For my Accord I used to just remote start it.... just made sure it wasn't in gear or it would take off on me (did this a few times lol)

For my Sebring.. I think I'll just let it idle down like I used to on my Camry. I need to get a remote start put on it soon.
 
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