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2014 Avalon Hybrid,
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Where are you located??????

120k miles in Manhattan? YES, TOO MANY. Suspension wear, salted roads...

120K miles in Kansas? Just now getting broken in.

I have 88k miles on mine, no issues of any kind. But...it's 5 years old, so...who knows???

Please put your location in your signature. More details about the car would be helpful.
 

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Depends on condition and price. If condition is good and you pay well below market price, probably OK. Deduct from market price at least $3,000 to cover a possible major component failure, i.e. inverter, HV battery, brake booster. Get a pre-purchase inspection by a qualified hybrid vehicle technician.
 

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I'd rather look at years, than at mileage. Reason being, average hybrid battery life is considered 7 years. Being a hybrid, engine and transmission/brakes are much less stressed.
 

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Best piece of advice I ever heard regarding a used car purchase is that you aren't buying miles, or years...you're buying the previous owner. Did they take care of it? Were they proactive with maintenance? That sort of thing.
 

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That's fine but how do you go proactive with hybrid battery care? As, like any other battery, it deteriorates over time, not miles driven. You can't do regular oil and filter for it. Or any other maintenance, truly. Maybe take it apart and clean copper buses at some point, but otherwise it's a pack of sealed units.
 

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Look at your local craigslist to see when the earlier Prius' prices crash due to battery failure. I live in Williamsburg Va, so it's probably about the same as Raleigh, very little rust problems and about 10 years average Prius battery life. That assumes the car was bought and kept locally. Got to DC and it drops, further north and rust and climate both contribute to earlier demise.
 

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2014 Avalon Hybrid,
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That's fine but how do you go proactive with hybrid battery care? As, like any other battery, it deteriorates over time, not miles driven. You can't do regular oil and filter for it. Or any other maintenance, truly. Maybe take it apart and clean copper buses at some point, but otherwise it's a pack of sealed units.
Are you sure about that? Miles driven == charge/depletion cycling, doesn't it? Won't that have a negative effect on battery longevity?
 

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Are you sure about that? Miles driven == charge/depletion cycling, doesn't it? Won't that have a negative effect on battery longevity?

And batteries degrade even if you don't use them. According to battery-testing firm Cadex Electronics, a fully charged battery will lose about 20 percent of its capacity after a year of typical storage. Increase the temperature to just above 100 degrees Fahrenheitas in a hot attic, for example and that number is 35 percent.
On the other hand, an empty battery pack can eventually fall into "deep discharge," at which point the battery's protection circuit intended to prevent power from reaching defective battery cells is triggered. This leaves the battery unable to charge at all.
Your best bet for long-term battery storage is to run the charge down to 50 percent, remove the battery from the device, and keep it cool. But even ideal storage conditions can leave you with a dead battery after three or four years.


A key failure point of hybrid batteries is when the individual cells become unbalanced from one another. A typical 20 series Toyota Prius has 28 individual cells and each of these cells have a capacity of approximately 6500mah. Over time this capacity deteriorates down to as low as 1500mah. This deterioration however, is never even while some cells maybe as low as 1500mah others could be 5000mah or higher. An unbalanced hybrid battery will deteriorate faster than one that is evenly balanced.


The length of time your hybrid battery will last is clearly dependent on several factors. While Toyota states an 8 year lifespan we typically see lifespans of 5 – 10 years depending on these factors. Should you wish to maximize the lifespan of your hybrid battery there are some simple things you can do. Regular servicing and maintenance will ensure the petrol engine is not under-performing and putting undue strain on the hybrid battery. A preventative recondition and rebalancing of your hybrid battery would ensure the optimal performance of your hybrid battery. This maybe inconvenient for current owners but those looking to purchase a second-hand model could easily factor it into the purchase price.
 

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Got it. There's no mention of degradation based on charge/depletion cycles.

What is the procedure for "recondition and rebalancing" the HV battery?
 

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Wonder what is the longest recorded life with OEM battery. For miles and years. Including the Prius models.



My colleague had a Prius and he had it for more than 10 years (60-70K, forgot, 2007 model). Had a bad hail storm and had to be totalled. He was driving <10 miles a day and other trips on weekend / etc.
 

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Not sure about longest but my 08 Prius has 368,000 miles and is going strong. Only repairs were a $50 a/c fan motor and $200 to have my dash display replaced. 1 recall repair no cost.
 
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