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Discussion Starter #1
Do I need any special tool? I bought a set of cheap $12 wrench w/ sockets some years ago. In changing my vw spark plugs, I needed a tool to pull the wireset out or risk damaging it. is there any such thing? This kit did come with a special socket for spark plugs.. do you think it's long enough? don't want to mess w/ it till I have some feed back on changing plugs and wireset on a corolla.

Thanks,
Gordon
 

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00 rolla VE
2000 Corolla
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460 Posts
just grab the boot on the wire (NOT THE WIRE) twist and pull it. it'll come off. the plugs are under there.

use NGK BFR5EKB11 or equivalent plugs. they are OEM replacement
 

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NoLa Rolla
'05 Corolla S 240K+ miles ('98 Corolla VE deceased in 2008)
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694 Posts
You'll probably need an extension on the socket for it to reach all the way down.

Gil
 

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NoLa Rolla
'05 Corolla S 240K+ miles ('98 Corolla VE deceased in 2008)
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694 Posts
Probably not. I've never had to use any.

Gil
 

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I use dielectric grease on mines because I had some left over and they are cheap anyways. I wished I put on some antiseize when I replaced my plugs because the old ones were tough as hell to get out--they had a lot of rust or some brown stuff on the threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
found some useful info.

source:
http://www.aa1car.com/library/sprkplg2.htm


quote

CHANGING SPARK PLUGS
When changing spark plugs, wait until the engine has cooled to remove the plugs. This is very important with aluminum cylinder heads because it reduces the risk of damaging the threads in the cylinder heads when the plugs come out (aluminum is a much softer metal than cast iron).
Most threads on spark plugs for engines with aluminum heads are either precoated to reduce the risk of thread damage, or the plug shell is made of a nickel alloy. If the plug shell is black or plain steel, however, you should put some antiseize to the threads, and reduce the applied torque by about 30 to 40%.
Do not use antiseize if the plug shell is nickel or has been precoated. Antiseize acts like a lubricant and may allow too much torque to be applied to the plugs, damaging the treads in the cylinder head.
TIGHTENING SPARK PLUGS: BE CAREFUL!
How much the spark plugs should be tightened depends on the size of the plugs and the type of plug seat. Spark plugs with gasket style seats require more torque than those with taper seats.
Always follow the vehicle manufacturer torque recommendations, but as a general rule 14 mm plugs with a gasket style seat should be tightened to 26 to 30 ft.lbs. in [COLOR=blue ! important][COLOR=blue ! important]cast iron[/COLOR][/COLOR] heads, but only 18 to 22 ft.lbs. in aluminum heads. Likewise, 18 mm plugs with gasket style seats should be tightened to 32 to 38 ft.lbs. in cast iron heads but only 28 to 34 ft.lbs. in aluminum heads. For taper seat spark plugs, 14 mm plugs should be tightened to 7 to 15 ft.lbs. in both cast iron and aluminum, while 18 mm taper seat plugs should be tightened to 15 to 20 ft.lbs. in both types of heads.


end quote.

 
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