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Discussion Starter #1
My mom has a 97 Corolla and she needs her rear brake shoes replaced soon. I never done brake drums before.

Is there a link with pictures where it shows how to do it?
 

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Hmmm.....working on brakes... try a shop manual like Haynes for step by step procedure...or take a auto repair course at your local night school before you try it.....a lot of things can go wrong... for example your cylinders might pop when remove your shoes...then you have to bleed your brake system....just too many things might go wrong.....you don't want to fool around with brakes.... especially if its for your mom;) .
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have done brake rotors before on my car and other people's car. I just haven't done drums and brake shoes. I just want to find out.
 

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I just replaced the rear brake shoes on the drum brakes in my GF's '94 Corolla last weekend. It's more involved than you think since you've only worked on disc brakes, but it's straightforward if you know what you're doing. I had a Haynes manual.

These tools make it a lot easier:
1. vice grip pliers - those return springs are a bitch! I couldn't do it with regular pliers.
2. brake spring hold down tool - I used regular pliers, and for the most part it was easy, but one was a real bitch, I should have just spent the $5 to buy the tool.
3. New C-washers - I just re-used the old ones, and they look like ass after I pried them off, so I bought some new ones ($0.82 at O'Reilly's, $4.99 for a whole new kit).

Also,

1. Be sure the lube the adjuster contact points and screw as well. I forgot to do it while I was down there.
2. Be sure to turn the adjuster to compensate for the brand new shoes.
3. I had to readjust my parking brake cable at the lever.

Hope this helps.
 

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93 Z24 and 78 Bronco
1993 z24
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you're not gonna get very many friendly responses by attacking people...

unhook the return springs, take off the hold down springs, unhook the parking brake cable....

remove whatever's on the rear shoe, put it on the new rear shoe, grease up all the contact points and adjuster (with high temp grease), retract the adjuster and reassemble

the way i look at it, you can either spend 20$ on a haynes manual and look at the pretty pictures while you're doing it (and you'll have the manual for all future references), or you can have a garage do it and charge you about an hour labour

while you have the brakes appart, now is a good time to check your wheel cylinders, apply equal pressure to either side of it with wedged in large flat head screwdrivers and ahve a buddy press the brake pedal, both sides should move pretty evenly
 

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If I hook up my scanner tonight I can scan in the relevant page in the Haynes manual, or take a digicam pic this weekend when I take it apart again. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.

In brief, the contact points where the points at which the shoes touch the raised surfaces (behind the shoes) and the points where the adjuster contacts the shoes (which is what I forgot to lube).

You can probably use anti-seize. The high temperature grease is some kind of moly based grease, and it says you can use it for any high temp application. The back of my anti-seize says pretty much the same thing, and even explicitly mentions it can be used on brake anchor pins.

Hope this helps.
 
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