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06 HiHy,10 Prius
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How are you measuring the voltage? Are you just reading what the software says or are you physically measuring them with a meter? If you are reading the software, what condition (Ready on, ignition only)? I'm guessing you are physically measuring them yourself since the software looks at blocks.... I have replaced cells in at least a dozen Toyotas, Prius and Camrys. In every case, the good cells were all within tenths of volts of each other (.1V or .2V difference). Anything over about .5V difference when loaded indicated a possible problem. You are saying there is over a Volt difference. I would definitely recommend replacing the two low ones.

In my experience, if they don't hold voltage, they're done. Before I put some in that have been sitting around, I top up the charge to get them close to what the other cells read. The system will do it, but I worry less if I do it first. I am sure there are all kinds of ways you should charge them properly... but I have never had a problem by just hooking up a 12V trickle charger and leaving it on for 20 or 30 minutes at about a 2A rate until the voltage comes up. My charger (an automatic Black and Decker from Lowes) has a function to tests the voltage. I just run the charger for a bit, switch it off and test the voltage until it is where I want it, usually about 8 volts. As I said, never had a problem. The cells charge really fast, so don't leave them alone. Oh, yeah, and they swell when charged so I always put them in a vise with wood blocks on both sides to keep them in line. Don't know if it matters, but I do it anyway.

I have heard of companies that "refurbish" the cells. I have no idea how they do it or if it's bogus. Again, if the voltage drops too low, I put cells in. Sometimes they'll last for years, sometimes not so much, but I have never had a cell that I replaced fail...it's always the other ones.

You can clean the copper connectors up to drop the resistance, but lately I have seen the sensor wires break in some Camrys... I don't know why. The entire connector with the sensor harness down that side is only about $40 and well worth the investment. I've got one on order right now. In my opinion and experience, to really do it "right," replace the low cells, carefully clean all the ends of the cells, replace all the connector assemblies and replace all the nuts. Yep, the nuts. They are about $1 apiece and they do corrode. All of that will be around $200 plus the cells. All your connections are then new, and the battery should last for years!

Good luck!
 

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(Fixed) Replaced cells in hybrid battery, now wont start.

Its now throwing :
P0AE6 Hybrid Battery Precharge Contractor Control Circuit Low
P3105 Battery ECU Communication Circuit Malfunction

There were two cells that were much lower than the rest (6.2ish compared to 8) that I replaced.

Is there anyone who has done cell replacement that could give me a hand? Also after hours of searching I found almost zero info/videos on what to do once you get the actual battery out, and what you should be testing for before you put everything back together.
 

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So I goofed and forgot to hook up something, but after I did now I'm getting the P0AFA code indicating "Hybrid Battery System Voltage Low". I checked the voltage and am trying to determine what readings I should be getting
 

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Thanks for the link, that is actually what I forgot to do before my second post. I really thought I had it when I found that! But now it has the issue per the second post with P0AFA.
 

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2008 TCH
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695 Posts
Thanks for the link, that is actually what I forgot to do before my second post. I really thought I had it when I found that! But now it has the issue per the second post with P0AFA.
So, you had the disconnect in the wrong position when you tried to start it before? Assuming you disconnected 12v batt. and did all this over again, with the same result.

Let us know the outcome!
 

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So, you had the disconnect in the wrong position when you tried to start it before? Assuming you disconnected 12v batt. and did all this over again, with the same result.

Let us know the outcome!
Correct. I had everything as it should be and then got the low voltage error.... which is now fixed!

I opened everything back up and I had not tightened the bolt that connects one of the cells, so it wasn't getting a solid connection. After that it worked as it should!

Thanks everyone for the responses
 

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Hybrid battery maintenance

Just wondered if anyone here has used a prolong battery reconditioning unit. I have a 2008 with almost 150,000 miles on it and I'm starting to worry about battery replacement. You can buy these reconditioning units on Amazon for $460 so if this would prolong my battery life substantially it would be well worth the money. They also say it's better to do this before your battery has failed.
 

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This package is ideal for people who have already degraded hybrid batteries, or batteries that are showing a fault (DTC) code.

At least maybe wait till they release the new discharge unit, instead of that piece of 2x4?
Also, you know it's 2 hr install time? Plus sitting there watching it while it works?
 

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2008 TCH
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Just wondered if anyone here has used a prolong battery reconditioning unit. I have a 2008 with almost 150,000 miles on it and I'm starting to worry about battery replacement. You can buy these reconditioning units on Amazon for $460 so if this would prolong my battery life substantially it would be well worth the money. They also say it's better to do this before your battery has failed.
It's all in your head. Just enjoy the car. If it's going to fail, nothing you can do about it anyway and most likely it was due to corrosion and as a result, bad connections. That device cannot fix corrosion problems. It almost sounds like you have fallen for a "gimmick".

If you really want to "do some maintenance" and are paranoid.... Pull the traction battery, clean all the bus bars of all of their corrosion (probably pretty bad at this point) and re-install.

Plenty of people with a lot more miles than that with no issues to include myself.
 

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Official PITA
Solara 'Vert & ES350
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524 Posts
ABSOLUTE Worst case, $2k at stealership, and the battery will be a rebuilt unit, with a short warranty; everything I've read says Toyota doesn't sell new traction batteries.
Depending on where you live, rebuilt batteries with a year warranty run from a low of around $650 installed, to $1200 or so. Get yourself a new starting battery if you need to do *something*, and drive it till battery does go bad.
My friend ran his '06 Highlander hybrid 240,000 - battery was still going, and going, and going.
 

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srellim234
'03 ECHO, '06 Prius
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14 Posts
Quite a few of us at another "Prius specific" forum have had good success with the Prolong system. Their new (April 2017 release) deluxe system with the more automated discharger is very much "plug and play" for each step of the process but it is time consuming. Figure about 4 to 4 1/2 days for the full conditioning process. You can do some balancing and conditioning in shorter time increments.

One of the biggest signs of weakness in the battery is seeing your battery display going up and down very quickly. Things like seeing it go from the high blue bars to the purple within the first block of driving in the morning. Another one is if the ICE engine seems to be coming on at inappropriate times and too often.

Battery failure is usually a failure of one or two cells, not the entire battery. Replacing those cells is pretty much "whack-a-mole" if you don't recharge and balance the whole thing. Another cell will soon go out. Many of the rebuilt batteries being sold by third parties have had a high failure rate; I don't think they are taking the time to have those batteries in great shape before they sell them because it takes time to do that.

I think the Prolong system is worth a shot. Go to the hybridautomotive.com site and talk with Jeff. He's the one who makes the Prolong system and he's a very straight up guy.
 

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2007 TCH owner
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341 Posts
Quite a few of us at another "Prius specific" forum have had good success with the Prolong system. Their new (April 2017 release) deluxe system with the more automated discharger is very much "plug and play" for each step of the process but it is time consuming. Figure about 4 to 4 1/2 days for the full conditioning process. You can do some balancing and conditioning in shorter time increments.

One of the biggest signs of weakness in the battery is seeing your battery display going up and down very quickly. Things like seeing it go from the high blue bars to the purple within the first block of driving in the morning. Another one is if the ICE engine seems to be coming on at inappropriate times and too often.

Battery failure is usually a failure of one or two cells, not the entire battery. Replacing those cells is pretty much "whack-a-mole" if you don't recharge and balance the whole thing. Another cell will soon go out. Many of the rebuilt batteries being sold by third parties have had a high failure rate; I don't think they are taking the time to have those batteries in great shape before they sell them because it takes time to do that.

I think the Prolong system is worth a shot. Go to the hybridautomotive.com site and talk with Jeff. He's the one who makes the Prolong system and he's a very straight up guy.
Probably not necessary if the car is driven daily and not sitting for weeks, letting the battery discharged is one way to kill it fast. I think this is just a waste of money IMHO, if a cell of your battery is going to die anyway I don't think rebalancing is going to make it last longer. It might probably perk it up temporarily but long term is a just a matter of luck.. just don't be fooled by those click baits where old batteries can be revived again..
 

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srellim234
'03 ECHO, '06 Prius
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14 Posts
You might want to check with some of the mechanics who have used it on their personal cars and measured the individual voltage on each individual cell. It makes a positive difference.

It's very much like maintaining any other system. Why do you change the oil? Over many years the engine will quit anyway. You maintain the system to delay what will happen eventually anyway. The same applies to the electrical system. This maintenance helps to delay the inevitable.

And yes, you are correct. It will not revive an already dead battery or cell.
 

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From S.Keith :

Investing in an HA Prolong reconditioning package and a battery load tester (BT-100 from Amazon) would be advisable if you really want to dig in.

In short, it would be:

  1. remove pack
  2. replace any modules with obvious voltage problems.
  3. conduct 3X HA reconditioning cycles.
  4. wait 7 days
  5. load test each module with 100A recording final voltage under load as reported by a separate meter
  6. Replace any outliers
There are no guarantees with any of this. If your pack is as bad as the 3 I've seen (all AZ packs), then you're going to be replacing a VERY large portion of the pack - which may not be cost effective.


You could invest LESS and actually do some module level reconditioning, but that is even MORE time consuming, but you would get better data.
 

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2007 TCH owner
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341 Posts
You might want to check with some of the mechanics who have used it on their personal cars and measured the individual voltage on each individual cell. It makes a positive difference.

It's very much like maintaining any other system. Why do you change the oil? Over many years the engine will quit anyway. You maintain the system to delay what will happen eventually anyway. The same applies to the electrical system. This maintenance helps to delay the inevitable.

And yes, you are correct. It will not revive an already dead battery or cell.
I'd be more inclined to ask the NY city drivers driving daily their Camry and Prius hybrids if they are doing any reconditioning for the very high miles they rack up. Getting an opinion from a mechanic who is purely bias on the product they bought or was given by a sponsor doesn't suggest that it works 100%. Most of it is just placebo.... save your money go to a fancy restaurant and pray for the hybrid gods that what you're ordering is for them.. you'll probably have more luck on that... electronic parts could die anytime :)

drive the car daily, keep it garaged, allow proper ventilation, that's it..
 

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after recondition traction battery, car won't start

My 07 TCH had check Hybrid error early last year and I took HV battery apart and replaced 1 failed cell and worked for 5 months. Same error came up, and did replace 1 bad cell and 2 other suspicious cells. It worked until two weeks ago and error came back again. This time I decided to recondition all the battery cells. I bought a EV-PEAK CQ3 4port charger and deep cycled each cell. some of the cells took more than 10 cycles to return to normal. afterwards, I put all cells in parallel connection overnight so that they all have the same voltage. After I put the battery back however, the car will not start, it has check hybrid error. but use code reader, it does not get power from the port so can not display any error code. I have pulled fuses in engine room and they looked fine. I tested on HV external terminal with safety-pin in, only got reading of 1V on both terminals. the battery fan runs. I have tested two relays inside of HV battery and both are fine, however, when turning the engine on, I don't hear the relay click. Any suggestion would be appreciated.
 
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