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Discussion Starter #1
As the title says, I'm trying to figure it out, what the life expectancy on ours ingnition coils is.

My XRS is running strong at 102 K miles, but my question comes up because sister's 2009 Honda Civic is getting them ignition coils burn in significantly less time than my Corolla.

Maybe Denso coils are better than the ones in Honda, just want to know what should I expect.

Maybe we can talk about good ignition coils brands also.
 

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I haven't noticed that it's a problem on these cars. One does show up every now and then but it's not a weak spot on these cars. I think most folks get many more miles out of them than what you have. You're just about due for a plug change at 120K if it's the same as the 1ZZ.
 

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I agree. I don't know of any coil lifespan issues. I work auto parts and can't remember selling a single one for any Toyota under 20 years old. I did sell a distributor and coil for a 22RE pickup, and that's all that comes to mind.

FWIW my factory coils are going strong at 252k.
 

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As for the Honda, more likely there's something else at work causing coil failures as a symptom of another problem. Nissan V6's had an issue that would cause the coils to fail rapidly one after another, it was a broken or poor ground on the engine. Other things that cause coils to fail can be bad connections at the harness, oil or water in the plug tubes, or excessively worn plugs putting a high spark energy demand on the coils.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As for the Honda, more likely there's something else at work causing coil failures as a symptom of another problem. Nissan V6's had an issue that would cause the coils to fail rapidly one after another, it was a broken or poor ground on the engine. Other things that cause coils to fail can be bad connections at the harness, oil or water in the plug tubes, or excessively worn plugs putting a high spark energy demand on the coils.
Will check this out.:smile:
 

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On my 2007 Sienna replaced the spark plugs at about 120,000 miles as recommended in the manual. Then at about 150,000 got check engine light followed by rough running so pulled off and was towed to a dealer. Scan showed codes 302 and 352 misfire codes. No. 4 coil bad but multiple error codes on the rest. We use in on the highway so per their recommendation changed the all. $$$
 

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On my 2007 Sienna replaced the spark plugs at about 120,000 miles as recommended in the manual. Then at about 150,000 got check engine light followed by rough running so pulled off and was towed to a dealer. Scan showed codes 302 and 352 misfire codes. No. 4 coil bad but multiple error codes on the rest. We use in on the highway so per their recommendation changed the all. $$$
Dang. Almost makes you miss the ole wires, cap and rotor days. Sure was a hell of alot less expensive.
 

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Got 2003 Corolla with 206K on original Ignition Coils. Also, did 142K with 2008 VW Jetta, 175K with 2002 Camry with original coils. I've owned many cars, and never had to purchase a single coil. I agree with above poster that, coil is not the weak spot in modern car, and even when it fails, the root of the problem could be from another source.
 

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As the title says, I'm trying to figure it out, what the life expectancy on ours ingnition coils is.

My XRS is running strong at 102 K miles, but my question comes up because sister's 2009 Honda Civic is getting them ignition coils burn in significantly less time than my Corolla.

Maybe Denso coils are better than the ones in Honda, just want to know what should I expect.

Maybe we can talk about good ignition coils brands also.
Honda uses Denso too. My Accord is at nearly 200K on original coil packs and no issues. I just changed #1 coil pack for the Corolla and that failed at 276K. I wouldn't change all if one fails. Just change one by one. COP is far superior to wires, cap and rotor. The reliability factor is much higher and less niggling ignition problems.
 
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