Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Toyotas.
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Besides all my vehicles (99 Camrys [2+2 family], '06 Avalon, '83 Gold Wing, '66 F-100), I use the old stuff around the house, too. A sample in pictures:

1914 Marion Giant Flip Flop. Makes perfect English muffins and toasted 'burger buns; 1958 Toastmaster Powermatic; early 1900's unsigned suger bowl.
These are all used nearly daily. Real butter. Because I like to live on the edge...!!
286042


'60's Osterizer, made in nearby Milwaukee!! And tough as nails!! NO PLASTIC!!
286043


Purchased Dec. 21, 1983. Over three and a half decades of washing. Maytag, as if you needed to ask...
286044


Converted from overhead belt drive. Note wood pulleys. Unknown age, late 1800's, early 1900's best guess. No name.
286045


"Obligatory Toyota content" - some of my parts stash.
286046


286047


1966 F-100. Because Toyota didn't make an 8 foot truck old enough.
286048
 

·
Registered
Toyotas.
Joined
·
215 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Remember old appliances that had SOLID STATE on them? Run forever.
Umm, no.
Look at the above: they're solid, but, not 'solid state', none of those have any electronics. Hell, the Marion toaster doesn't even have an 'on/off' switch - you have to unplug the bastard to make it quit!!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,451 Posts
When I was in the country first time, in 1990, at my grand aunt house, all of her appliances were OLD and had SOLID STATE logo on them. I presumed, this was some sort of quality mark. Back in the USSR, we had "QUALITY SIGN" that was stamped on only strictly scrutinized for quality products.
286051
 

·
Registered
1992 Geo Prizm
Joined
·
1,213 Posts
Hell I'm old and I love my wife (she's a vintage 1961) does that count? I have a 65 VW type 3 Notchback w/factory sunroof, a 70 VW Type 3 Fastback with FI and AT, a 92 Geo Prizm (Toyota Corolla clone) sedan, and a 99 and 00 Honda Accord sedans. I've also got an 88 Chevy Astro window van. My home is a 1972 build, and other than that, everything else is kind of modern. But yes, I do like old stuff, as it was built to last unlike today's garbage.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla CE
Joined
·
2,610 Posts
I like those toasters! I love old stuff. Off the top of my head I can only think of a vintage mixer we have, and it gets used a lot. I love cast iron cookware as well. Most of ours is new stuff, but technology wise it's old.
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Highlander Base
Joined
·
34,903 Posts
Question: Are you into old stuff?

Answer in two words: Hell, yes!

Some of my favorite old things I've saved for very good reason are the power tools I inherited from my Dad. He's still alive, but now that he's too old to do much woodworking, etc., himself, he gave them all to me. Just recently I had to take a fifty-year-old Black & Decker power drill in for repair because the power cord had frayed at the base enough so that it gave me an electric shock and burned my hand. The guy at the repair shop was beside himself and said, "Oh, wow, an old school power drill! They don't make them like that anymore...those are awesome with all that torque...they're built like tanks!" He then called one of his workers over to check out the drill and we talked about old tools for about fifteen minutes. Funniest thing of all was when he filled out the work order he took my first name and phone number but no other information and wrote instead "old school drill." I asked him if he needed my other information and he said no that "old school drill" was enough for him and that he'd remember me, etc. He also offered to buy the drill for top dollar if I ever wanted to sell it.

And that's why old stuff is so valuable, because so very often they literally don't make things with the same quality that they used to. :)
 

·
Premium Member
2008 Highlander Base
Joined
·
34,903 Posts
yeah, turns out there's not much profit to be had in a product you only need to buy once and lasts forever....
Although I guess when products are really good they sell more units due to word of mouth. I have another item I've inherited from my dad, which is his cast-aluminum BBQ cooker that is built like a main battle tank and is now almost 60-years-old. I needed a new grill for it and to my surprise found that the company that made the cooker is still in business in Arkansas, they still sell the EXACT same cooker, and, yes, they had the replacement grill I needed. Too awesome for words. :)
 

·
Newbie One Kanobi
2003 Toyota ECHO!!
Joined
·
8,697 Posts
As a lover of history I like old stuff. But I just appreciated it. I don't own it. Only cause i"m a minimalist. It's also a testimony that older buildings (not all) but certain ones hold up better and longer than newer ones. Costs and craftmanship. Craftmanship, something that is lost. Go to 19th century houses and the beautiful woodwork etc. Even with older cars. Passion you can see in there. Not saying there isn't passion now, but we know it's bean counters and designers clash.
 

·
Registered
09 Corolla Base
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
As a lover of history I like old stuff. But I just appreciated it. I don't own it. Only cause i"m a minimalist. It's also a testimony that older buildings (not all) but certain ones hold up better and longer than newer ones. Costs and craftmanship. Craftmanship, something that is lost. Go to 19th century houses and the beautiful woodwork etc. Even with older cars. Passion you can see in there. Not saying there isn't passion now, but we know it's bean counters and designers clash.
Craftsmanship in older buildings is amazing. Years back I worked construction for a company that was rebuilding houses in Chicago's up and coming trendy areas. The homes were extremely close together, a taller person could touch both houses when walking between them. As newer building codes required more space between them you had to save a percentage of the original frame to be grandfathered in, to keep the same size house.. The houses were stripped down to their frames to see what was needed to be down to keep everything structurally sound. Theses houses were originally built late 1800's and early 1900's. They used true 2 x material, not the reduced size used today. These frames were notched together and sometimes pins used as well. All done without power tools.
We stopped more than a few times and just said WOW.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top