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Practically clear oil means nothing. You could've sent the old oil out for analysis if you want to see its real condition.
Timely comment, I just sent in my oil for analysis, at only ~3,500 miles driven over the last 12 month interval. COVID slowed down our travel significantly. I'll post the results when they get back to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Practically clear oil means nothing. You could've sent the old oil out for analysis if you want to see its real condition.
How do you buy a car and not know what it comes with? Impressive resume in the 'trucking business' but consumer clueless?????? Yeah, ok
Well, I also happen to know a few facts about oil. 1, it doesn't loose its ability to "lubricate", oil doesn't wear out, it gets contaminated. 2, if you want to really know when to change the oil, you need to do it by engine hours, NOT by mileage. It's the burning of the fuel that contaminates the oil with acids and solids that then harm the close tolerances of the engine. That is why my 2015 Civic that gets 40 mpg does not require as frequent of an oil change as my 1969 Mustang that got at best 13 mpg. And the fact that the OEM's give you a timeframe on oil changes is likely based on the fact that if you only travel 5,000 miles in a year, you're probably driving in town and your mpg's are on the low end, thus contaminating the oil faster than if you do 20,000 miles a year. And as far as taking an oil sample, oil analysis is mainly meant to be used as a guide and over a long period of time. One sample does not mean a whole lot unless the patient is "dying". Much like a blood test. You establish a baseline for your engine and go on that.

Oil change intervals, the name brand of filter and the types of oil used are a continual debate and discussion on every message board there is if it involves an engine. In the end, do what you want to do.
 

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Oil wears out. Its called nitration and oxidation. Contamination can be dealt with filtration. But nitration/oxidation are dealt with by removing the oil and replacing it. There are also additives that get spent. TBN/TAN go along with nitration/oxidation, ZDDP and other antiwear additives get used up. You can turn oil in jello, sludge, or gritty carbon. So, it would be worn out.

No, you don't need to change oil by engine hours. Engine hours is best for fixed load/fixed RPM engines. My 100 engine hours on this interstate at 100mph at 10mpg is a little different than someone else's 100 engine hours at 40mpg at 55mph. Engine hours is one of many variables, like calendar time, mileage, and fuel used. Fuel used tend to be accurate. Algorithms in oil life monitors can include many variables, including running rpm when cold counting down faster, than when hot. A short tripper that never warms an engine for 100 engine hours, is completely different than a highway commuter on the highway for 100 hours.

One UOA sample means a ton if the driving style is consistent. I don't need a trend. And, my Toyota engines aren't in a dying state. Trending has its purpose for consistency. Don't need it if driving parameters are normalized. A single UOA provides plenty of information, if TBN/TAN/oxidation/nitration/moisture is included.. You won't get that from the non-ISO certified popular BITOG lab.

In the end, there are too many people that think they know so much because of their so-called experience and are border line clueless.
 

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2019 Avalon Limited, Advanced Safety Package, BlackVue DR-750 Dash Cam, Ceramic Pro Coating, XPel
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Timely comment, I just sent in my oil for analysis, at only ~3,500 miles driven over the last 12 month interval. COVID slowed down our travel significantly. I'll post the results when they get back to me.
Here's the oil analysis report:
 

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316739
1608070581530.png
 

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6.7cst is thin. I'd use a 5w30, and do on my 2gr's

No TAN/TBN/oxidation/nitration/moisture.... and why I don't care for Blackstone. I don't care for the so-called 'water' measurement or their 'fuel dilution' method.

I guess Toyota is smart to require a yearly change for those that don't get to 10k miles. Toyota also has a severe service interval of 5k miles/6months for those that meet the so-called special-service requirements.
 

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2019 Avalon Limited, Advanced Safety Package, BlackVue DR-750 Dash Cam, Ceramic Pro Coating, XPel
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6.7cst is thin. I'd use a 5w30, and do on my 2gr's.No TAN/TBN/oxidation/nitration/moisture.... and why I don't care for Blackstone. I don't care for the so-called 'water' measurement or their 'fuel dilution' method. I guess Toyota is smart to require a yearly change for those that don't get to 10k miles. Toyota also has a severe service interval of 5k miles/6months for those that meet the so-called special-service requirements.
I think the 0-20 is strictly for the "increased" miles per gallon. Blackstone will do the TAN/TBN, but charge an extra $10 or so. At 3,500 miles, I didn't really see the need.......Probably an errror on my side.
 

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By PPMs it doesn't seem like a lot, but by percentage wise it would be. Another reason to change out the initial break-in oil earlier, if the car's a keeper. Just to get rid of those wear metals.
 

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For the DIY'ers, this is not the easiest oil change. The plastic engine guard/pan or whatever they call it is a real pain. It goes WAY the heck toward the rear of the car, so if you jack up the front end and put on jack stands, make SURE you are way up in the air. You can't see the rear fastener and have to release it by feel unless the car is really really jacked up.
Is there an oil service access panel like on the 8th gen (2018 - ) Camry? So the procedure is pretty much the same as the 8th gen Camry like this video? Or do you have to remove something bigger that goes all the way to the back of the car?

I know nowadays since 2017 or so every mid-size and full-size sedan is coming with way more underbody covers to reduce road noise and give a quieter ride and any sensible manufacturer either includes cutouts or removable access panels to get to the oil and filter. Would have preferred a cutout so that you don't have to remove any panels at all, but you only see that on a few compacts (i.e. Kia Forte/Hyundai Elantra) and compact crossovers (i.e. Subaru Crosstrek). "Classier" cars tend to have removable panels unless you get something from a crazy manufacturer like Audi where they don't even have a drain plug and you have to suck the oil from the top.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
You can get to the drain plug without removing any panels, but to get to the oil filter, a rather large panel has to be removed which goes a way to the rear of the car. 3 front 10mm I think hex head fasteners and a few plastic "push lock" type of things in the back. I'm curious as to how long those will last and stay "locked". Seems like it might be a good idea to have a few on hand in the future. We had a KIA Forte before and it was nice with the 2 smaller access panels to get to the filter and drain plug. Seems that is the way to go if larger panel is in place.
 

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You can get to the drain plug without removing any panels, but to get to the oil filter, a rather large panel has to be removed which goes a way to the rear of the car. 3 front 10mm I think hex head fasteners and a few plastic "push lock" type of things in the back. I'm curious as to how long those will last and stay "locked". Seems like it might be a good idea to have a few on hand in the future. We had a KIA Forte before and it was nice with the 2 smaller access panels to get to the filter and drain plug. Seems that is the way to go if larger panel is in place.
Oh man, sounds difficult. I found a oil change tip video on the 2020 Lexus ES 350 and while it doesn't show the full process, I assume that's the same plate since the ES and Avalon share the same platform, wheelbase, and a lot of other things.

One last question: do you have to replace the gasket or some kind of copper crush ring on the oil drain plug? I saw a post on the Club Lexus forums where someone mentioned "the copper crush ring for the oil draining bolt needs to be replaced."
 

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One last question: do you have to replace the gasket or some kind of copper crush ring on the oil drain plug? I saw a post on the Club Lexus forums where someone mentioned "the copper crush ring for the oil draining bolt needs to be replaced."
It's highly recommended to replace the crush washer. I'll be getting one of these drain valves once the 2 year complimentary service on my avalon is up: Amazon.com: EZ Oil Drain Valve EZ-103RH Oil Drain Valve, 1 Pack: Automotive
I've used it on all my previous vehicles. Makes oil change jobs fast, easy, and less messy.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I think the crush washer is aluminum and I think I got a pack of like 5 or so. Can't really remember if I replaced it or not actually. It's one of those things where all OEM's tell you to do that. For what it cost, it's cheap insurance I think. The job is not really "difficult" per se, but could have been designed to be easier. Make sure you follow the torque specs when going back together with the oil filter housing and drain cap. Easy to over torque and then becomes a real pain the next time.
 

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FYI for anyone claiming Toyota Care is great for the 1st oil change, they didn't want to change the oil in my 2020 XSE at 5k miles - I asked them to and I will skip the 10K oil change with them and they agreed.
The reason given was that it doesn't need to be done for 10K because it is "full synthetic" - I told them it was break-in oil and I wanted it changed. They agreed with the caveat that the 10K oil change is on me. Fine - I don't mind splashing a little oil on the garage floor for peace of mind...
I live in Florida - where the car was run in 90+F temps for 3000 of the 5000 miles and the other 2K was between 40 - 85F. I would consider it light extreme duty conditions
 

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At least in my hybrid the 5,000 mi required maintenance items are pretty minimal and does not include oil change. I did change my oil initially at about 3,000 mi but I did this myself. At 10,000 mi I got my first free oil change and tire rotation at the Toyota dealership.will change. I'm now sitting at 15,000 mi. My next free oil change will be at 20,000 mi. After that I'll be doing most of the maintenance myself. In my estimation there's no significant maintenance required at 5,000 mi.
 

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The Car Care Nut (a Toyota dealer service tech) released a video talking about oil burning in modern (Toyota) engines and convinced me that oil changes should be at 5,000 miles given the 70 miles of rush hour traffic that I have to commute through every day. Yes, manufacturers want to tell the consumer that their cars are low maintenance and oil changes only need to happen every 10k but oil is cheap and a new engine or car is not. Will definitely be doing my first oil change myself at 5k and another at 15k.
 

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For those who are following this thread and considering changing your own oil I did not find the engine access panels on my hybrid to be an issue other than adding a few minutes to remove and reinstall those. Just take your time and it should not be an issue. If you are comfortable changing oil on most engines then give it a try. I used standard drive up ramps although I did use some lumber to start lifting the car before I hit the actual ramp. Without using the lumber, the low hanging front edge of the car would have hit the ramp before the lifting began. I reused the crush washer on my first change but I would plan to change it next time. I found the proper Toyota crush washer part number for my 2020 hybrid engine as SKU: 90430-A0006. The specs for the crush washer listed are shown below. It looks like it would fit a 2.5 L gas as well but double check for your application.
  • Genuine:
    SKU: 90430-A0006
    Positions: Lower
  • Other Names: Lower Oil Pan Gasket, Drain Plug Gasket, Gasket
  • Description:
    3.5L. 2011-16. 2017-20. 2.5L, type 2. Us built, eng# a-j. Exc.Japan Built Part. Engine # axxxxxx-jxxxxxx.
I do periodic oil analysis on all my engines. Not everytime but enough to establish a history and a sense of how the oil is holding up. My driving is mostly highway so for the moment, I anticipate staying with 10,000 mile change intervals unless I see issues from the oil analysis.
 

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The Car Care Nut (a Toyota dealer service tech) released a video talking about oil burning in modern (Toyota) engines and convinced me that oil changes should be at 5,000 miles given the 70 miles of rush hour traffic that I have to commute through every day. Yes, manufacturers want to tell the consumer that their cars are low maintenance and oil changes only need to happen every 10k but oil is cheap and a new engine or car is not. Will definitely be doing my first oil change myself at 5k and another at 15k.
Is the below video the one you are referring to above?

Why do Toyota engines consume oil ? And how to prevent it? - YouTube
 

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Is the below video the one you are referring to above?

Why do Toyota engines consume oil ? And how to prevent it? - YouTube
Yes, they are the same video.

  • Genuine:
    SKU: 90430-A0006
    Positions: Lower
  • Other Names: Lower Oil Pan Gasket, Drain Plug Gasket, Gasket
  • Description:
    3.5L. 2011-16. 2017-20. 2.5L, type 2. Us built, eng# a-j. Exc.Japan Built Part. Engine # axxxxxx-jxxxxxx
Thanks for finding the part number! 0W-20 Oil, the crush washer and Part Number: 04152YZZA1 (oil filter element) are all we need, right? It's my first time seeing one of these type of filters vs the old spin-on type. Already hit my initial 1000 miles so I'm planning to do the change this weekend.
 

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Yes, they are the same video.


Thanks for finding the part number! 0W-20 Oil, the crush washer and Part Number: 04152YZZA1 (oil filter element) are all we need, right? It's my first time seeing one of these type of filters vs the old spin-on type. Already hit my initial 1000 miles so I'm planning to do the change this weekend.
You may want to pick up a oil filter canister socket/wrench or use a ratchet strap on the canister. They generally don't come off as easily as a all-in-one oil filter.
I like the Motivx branded ones - good quality
 
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