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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am replacing the fuel filter on a 1996 Camry 5SFE. I already have a new Wix filter. The car originally came from Wisconsin and has rust. I used a flare wrench to try to remove the fuel line from the filter, but it absolutely would not work. I had to cut the line. Now, I'm having a problem in reconnecting the new filter to the line. I can cut out a section of the fuel line, flare it, bend it, and get a 14 mm fitting, which goes into the filter. I was then planning on connecting the line from the filter to the rest of the line (where I will cut it) and connect it with fuel injection hose and clamps. The guy at the parts store told me that any screw clamp will not withstand the pressure from the fuel injection line and will burst or become otherwise dangerous and that I should only use metal compression fittings. I thought as long as the rubber hose I am using to connect the two ends of the fuel line is the type made for fuel injection, then it is not a problem using a couple of screw-type clamps to secure the rubber hose to the steel fuel line. Is the parts store guy right, or is it perfectly fine to do what I was planning?
 

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The parts store guy is correct, you cannot rely on a screw clamp. It may work for a time but there is the risk of it letting go which is extremely dangerous, especially if you happen to park the car in an enclosed space at some point.
 

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The parts store guy is correct, you cannot rely on a screw clamp. It may work for a time but there is the risk of it letting go which is extremely dangerous, especially if you happen to park the car in an enclosed space at some point.
Spot-on response. You will never see a flexible fuel line connected to a fitting by using screw clamps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So, how do I join the two ends of the metal fuel line? Compression fittings? Or is it better to go to a junk yard and replace the entire line from filter to tank?
 

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i think i'd go with replacing the entire line. i'm sure there are guys that can do these compression fittings on stainless steel but i can't.
tony
 

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So, how do I join the two ends of the metal fuel line? Compression fittings? Or is it better to go to a junk yard and replace the entire line from filter to tank?
How much of the old fuel line did you cut out?

An auto parts store should have a free rental tool to take your old line and put a flare end on it. If you purchase a new compression fitting on the old cut line, then flare the end, you can buy another small length of metal tubing to connect to your old, now short piece, and your new fuel filter.

This video will help you understand how to get your old, now short fuel line set up to attach and small section onto it and onto your new fuel filter:

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I only cut a small part of it right behind the 14mm fitting that screws into the filter. The problem is that there is not enough room in there to use a double flare tool and there is a 90 degree bend that won't allow it to be flared because it is too short after being cut. It would need to be straightened, flared, and then bent again, which will make it too short to reach the filter at the right angle. Thanks 93Celicaconv for the good video.....I have watched other very similar videos and the problem is that the videos make it look easy, because it is done on a bench or in a vise. There is not enough room while the line is still attached to the car. So, I would have to cut the line somewhere in the middle, take out the front portion and flare it at the bench/vise so I can then attach it to the filter with a new 14mm fitting. Problem is that the metal line is then cut and how to join the two together.

Bitter, are you saying that I CAN connect the two ends of the metal fuel line with rubber fuel injection hose if I use these clamps of which you have posted photos? Everyone else seems to think it is dangerous. What does everyone think? Has anyone removed the entire fuel line? Any idea how much a junk yard charges for that? I'm not sure where exactly it connects in the back of the car (and I'm betting it is rusty too).
 

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Look into Papco (Paulin Automotive ) fuel line repair / replacement kits.

They come with compression olive type fittings for your hard line and the threaded (or quick connect) on the other. I see them at NAPA and carquests.
 

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Use a fuel line clamp.


Hell, VW uses....
spring clamps
You CAN use fuel-injection rated hose with fuel-injection screw-clamps BUT - The metal lines need to have a bubble or barb on the ends where the hose is to be fastened to prevent the hose from working it's way loose. You can do that with a double-flare tool.
Otherwise your best bet is to use a compression fitting to splice the new metal line to the old.

Happy Motoring, Mark
 

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Correct, I forgot to clarify that point.

Easiest fix is to get a bit of pre-flared line, bend it to to line up with the filter, then cut the stock line on a flat section and use a compression fitting to mate the two lines together. A compression fitting is perfectly acceptable to use on a fuel line, just make sure the old line is clean smooth bare metal where the fitting will be used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If I do that, does the other (cut) end of the fuel line that goes into the compression fitting need to be flared? I can't flare it while it's on the car because there is not enough room.
 

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The old fuel line will have a threaded fitting that crushes a brass 'olive' that will seal, so you do not need to flare it.
 

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If I do that, does the other (cut) end of the fuel line that goes into the compression fitting need to be flared? I can't flare it while it's on the car because there is not enough room.
The section of new fuel line you get to replace the one you had to cut, should have the nut & flare to fit your fuel filter. The other end, and the end of the original line on the car, just need to be cut clean and round to fit the nuts and brass ferrules for the compression fitting. No flaring is required there.

Happy Motoring, Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hajoca, I'm sure it's my lack of clear explanation, but I cut off the rusted threaded fitting that goes into the fuel filter, so it is just a plain cut metal fuel line on the car now. Thanks for responding and trying to help.

Mark D, thanks for that info. From where can I purchase the compression fitting? Would a place like a hardware store have that (Home Depot, Lowe's)? Can you tell me if there is a number or size or whatever info I need?
 

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Ok why not simply replace the line?

Auto stores carry lines of various sized with flare fittings already attached on both ends...


Just pop.in a new line...


Bend the line by hand... loop or twist any extra to make it the right.length..


This is the proper way to deal with a hacked gas line: replace it completely


This is IF you can't re flair your hacked line...


What am.I missing here?
 

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Ok why not simply replace the line?

Auto stores carry lines of various sized with flare fittings already attached on both ends...


Just pop.in a new line...


Bend the line by hand... loop or twist any extra to make it the right.length..


This is the proper way to deal with a hacked gas line: replace it completely


This is IF you can't re flair your hacked line...


What am.I missing here?
Finding one replacement line that's long enough, and already equipped with the correct fittings, might be a problem if it's a single line all the way from the engine compartment to the tank. It's probably going to need another union or connection somewhere anyway. Then the new line should be run around, over, under or through the spaces or brackets where the old line was. So it's not so simple.

Happy Motoring, Mark
 

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Do the repair properly and replace the fuel line. I *think* the part number is 77251-06020 but hard to tell from the diagram. Not that expensive about $35 from Toyota.
 
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