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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all-

This might be an old mode of thinking, but I have always thought heard that starting an ICE is one of the most wear-inducing moments it goes through. Obviously a cold start is probably much harder on it than a warm-start.

This is one of my concerns as I consider HiHy's with 50-120k miles on them--that's a whole lot of starts!

Can anyone assuage my fears?

Also, do you "buy" the dealer's pitch that the ICE on a hybrid is under much less stress than a standard non-hybrid, due to it:

-having time to cool-down between uses
-operating at more optimal/efficient RPM bands
-not needing to provide torque at relatively low RPM's

Thanks much!
 

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Dealer talking? Buyer listening?
Joking?
We have known club of over 200 000 miles on hybrids here and at Camry hybrid forums. Some on everything original brake pads included - or so they claim. I think I saw one with 273 000 miles odo picture posted here.
That answers your question.
Come and see. Ihi passico. Come here to Seattle - and see that likely 75% of taxi cabs are Prius.
That answers your question also.
Not dealer sucked out of pinky sales pitch.
Again, see my response in your other post. Hybrids are NOT for everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Definitely not joking--just a cautious buyer here.

I suppose that taxi's being hybrids is a pretty good indicator that they'll last! Thanks for that bit of perspective.
 

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Oh yeah. But there is HUGE difference between Prius and Highlander. I'd recommend Prius V hands down no questions asked even for your commute parameters.
Not a Highlander. nope.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I should have also mentioned that we have 1 baby, and another probably on the way in a year or two...so a smaller car is not really an option.

Also, all-wheel-drive is a must--it is really the motivation for getting rid of our faithful Camry.
 

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There is Toyota Sienna with AWD option.
Likely a better choice.
I have 2012 Limited Hybrid. 3rd row. I fit 6 adults in comfortably plus luggage. Vehicle is very utilitarian. But again, if 4WD is of concern with decent size space - large Subaru will do. Some folks are opposed to minivans. Or, regular Highlander.
It depends. Say, in Minnesota, with harsh winters, Subaru or 4Runner are totally appropriate.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
. Some folks are opposed to minivans.
You nailed it here...in this case, "Some folks" = the primary driver of this vehicle, my lovely wife!

Considered Subaru, but the reliability record (head gasket issues, oil leaks, etc.) and totally uninspired driving experience is nixing that.

I think a conventional Highlander is the way forward. Thank you for your help!
 

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She makes BIG mistake. One thing I know about babies is cargo room is never enough. Minivan is minivan.
Subies are not that bad. Older ones did have those issues but they worked with it. But it's totally superb 4WD.
Yeah, regular Highlander will do. Lexus even better but they are much less utalitarian. We have Highlander clone, RX350 side to side. No comparison. But reliability is stellar.
So it's a toss.
Either way, I'd not buy a hybrid that old. 10 years... Nope. I like them at least with marginal warranty left, as it shows itself in first few weeks of ownership. So you are covered. That's how cars are.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
She makes BIG mistake. One thing I know about babies is cargo room is never enough. Minivan is minivan.
Subies are not that bad. Older ones did have those issues but they worked with it. But it's totally superb 4WD.
Yeah, regular Highlander will do. Lexus even better but they are much less utalitarian. We have Highlander clone, RX350 side to side. No comparison. But reliability is stellar.
So it's a toss.
Either way, I'd not buy a hybrid that old. 10 years... Nope. I like them at least with marginal warranty left, as it shows itself in first few weeks of ownership. So you are covered. That's how cars are.
I don't fit in an RX350--headroom much reduced, and I do not like the limited visibility out the front windshield--feels very low. I'm pretty tall and very-long torsoed--so its probably an issue unique to me.

Am I understanding you correctly that the Lexus RX350's AWD is superior to the Highlander?

Thanks again for your help.
 

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I'm 6'4.5"" and I fit excellently well into HiHy. Less so in RX350. It's a canoe.
Yes, you have mechanical transfer case and viscous differential in RX350 or RX300. With formal drive shaft from T-case to the rear diff. Also, our 2011 Rx350 has AWD lock feature. What makes it a very hefty 4WD for winter. Not for off roading, but for less harsh yet requiring 4WD conditions. In HiHy, you can not have that as there is no connection between the front and rear ends. So all four can't be locked, like you have in formal 4WD systems. 4Runner has permanent 4WD. Sienna has same setup as RX350 or conventional Highlander - t-case, driveshaft, rear mechanical differential. RAV4 also. Btw, RAV4 is not much smaller now from Highlander and is very good car.
 

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Well, well, well.. And the timing chain itself, that stretches. And the temsioner hydraulics that eventually start giving up on pressure. Though Toyota been much better about this than say Nissan. But V6 that we have has a very dystrophic timing chain for the engine size.
But what they did, they designed engine to stop with piston right past the DTC, what makes it easier to start.
 
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