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1996 Corolla
My cousin has a hydraulic lift in his garage. We want to use the lift to raise the car when we bleed the brakes after we install the master cylinder. Can we put the lift arms where the screw jack picks the car up? Or, is there lift points just for a garage lift?
 

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Only touch pinch-welds at spots used by factory jack. Notice that factory jack does NOT touch pinch-welds. That's on body ABOVE spot-weld. You can get jack adapter-pads that has slot for pinch-weld to fall into, then load is actually carried by body of car. Jack-stands also have slot in middle to not touch pinch-weld.

As test, jack up car on all 4-corners supported only by tip of pinch-welds. Then shove car sideways as hard as you can and see what happens.


Also note where Toyota dealer mechanics actually place jack...
 

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2008 Toyota Camry Base / CE
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18,382 Posts
What do you think "lift blocks" are?
And why they are only needed on the side body panel?
And not on the beefier crossmember points?
Do you guys really think that Toyota would allow their mechanics to do this to their customer's brand-new cars?
Yes. It depends on the dealerships willingness to invest on hoist accessories.
 

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I guess I care about my cars more than others. I would never take my cars to any shop that would do that kind of damage. It's attention to detail. If they cause that kind of damage with simple jacking operation, makes you wonder what kind of work they do with the mechanicals. Cars should come back cleaned and vacuumed with no grease on floor or steering-wheel.

To answer the OP's questions, yes follow the manual:

1. if you have proper "lift blocks" to support the pinch welds, then go ahead and use them.

2. otherwise use the frame-rails points, which are extra re-inforced beefy box-sections (blue).

3. for HF hydraulic floor jacks, use the cross-members (green). This is fast and balanced, and you don't twist body of car. Notice how doors don't close quite right when you jack up just one corner?

Another benefit of not damaging pinch-welds is rust. With such small contact-surface area, it's inevitable that you'll scrape off paint down to bare metal. Then rust sets in (see photo above), especially if you live in rainy/snow area. Before you know it, you'll have holes through bottom of body. With much larger contact-area and lower pressure on crossmembers and frame-rails, paint stays intact and no rusing.

 

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1995 Toyota Corolla
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I guess I care about my cars more than others. I would never take my cars to any shop that would do that kind of damage. It's attention to detail. If they cause that kind of damage with simple jacking operation, makes you wonder what kind of work they do with the mechanicals. Cars should come back cleaned and vacuumed with no grease on floor or steering-wheel.

To answer the OP's questions, yes follow the manual:

1. if you have proper "lift blocks" to support the pinch welds, then go ahead and use them.

2. otherwise use the frame-rails points, which are extra re-inforced beefy box-sections (blue).

3. for HF hydraulic floor jacks, use the cross-members (green). This is fast and balanced, and you don't twist body of car. Notice how doors don't close quite right when you jack up just one corner?

Another benefit of not damaging pinch-welds is rust. With such small contact-surface area, it's inevitable that you'll scrape off paint down to bare metal. Then rust sets in (see photo above), especially if you live in rainy/snow area. Before you know it, you'll have holes through bottom of body. With much larger contact-area and lower pressure on crossmembers and frame-rails, paint stays intact and no rusing.

The lower diagram is for a frame-based vehicle. The upper diagram is for a Corolla, at the pinch welds (black dots).
 

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2008 Toyota Camry Base / CE
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18,382 Posts
You put the lift or hoist arm or jack stand where you gotta put it so it doesn't fall. If it is gonna bend a pinch weld or eventually make it rust, oh well. At least the car is not falling and destroying itself or killing someone. If you can do the frame, do the frame. If you gotta go to the pinch weld, you gotta go to the pinch weld. The only way to lift my 08 Camry on a hoist is with the front arms on the frame and the rear arms with an extension on the pinch welds. I don't jack my car on the frame because I don't trust jacking on the frame. I at times will use the crossmember to lift my car but the last time I did it it ended up slipping off the jack, smacking onto the radiator support, smacking on the the ATF line, and tearing the plastic of my radiator with that ATF line.
 
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