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Well, there is large... and then there is practical.

Largest factory size for modern Corollas is 225/40R18

Largest practical size would be 225/35R19 as after that rim and tire clearance would be a concern, ride suffers greatly, and damage is a high probability

20" could be possible with super low profile tires, spacers, and fender manipulation, but ride will be absolutely terrible.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, there is large... and then there is practical.

Largest factory size for modern Corollas is 225/40R18

Largest practical size would be 225/35R19 as after that rim and tire clearance would be a concern, ride suffers greatly, and damage is a high probability

20" could be possible with super low profile tires, spacers, and fender manipulation, but ride will be absolutely terrible.
I was referring to tire size not wheel sizes. Just wondering whats the biggest tire size you can go on the 17 in wheel sports model. Like has anyone here done P235/50/17 ?
 

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I had snow tires that were larger than OE because I needed them and it's what the tireshop had that would fit. Filled up the wheel arch really well actually and had a nice aggressive tread too. The ride was instantly improved as well from the extra sidewall.

I think they were a P205/50r17 size. You could go up just a little more than that if you really wanted to, but your speedometer will be off.

Any reason why you are wanting to go bigger? I'm genuinely curious.


Here's mine with the slightly larger snow tires.
 

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Just stay with what tires are recommended a wider tire or going from 50 series to 55 is not going to make the ride any better. Vehicle manufactures choose things like tire sizes to give the best all around results. Besides with the sorry state of the roads in most areas nothing will help.
 

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I had snow tires that were larger than OE because I needed them and it's what the tireshop had that would fit. Filled up the wheel arch really well actually and had a nice aggressive tread too. The ride was instantly improved as well from the extra sidewall.

I think they were a P205/50r17 size. You could go up just a little more than that if you really wanted to, but your speedometer will be off.

Any reason why you are wanting to go bigger? I'm genuinely curious.
The Corolla OEM sizes are around 25" diameter. The 205/50R17 is a proper size as it also has a 25" diameter. Here are the OEM tires.

195/65R15 25.0" diameter
205/55R16 24.9" diameter
215/45R17 24.6" diameter *** Too Small ***

The r17" sizes that work perfectly.
205/50R17 25.1" diameter
225/45R17 25.0" diameter
245/40R17 25.0" diameter

I run 225/45R17 for my 3 season tires and 205/50R17 for my winter tires. The narrower tire is better for winter but the sidewall height is the same.
 

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Just stay with what tires are recommended a wider tire or going from 50 series to 55 is not going to make the ride any better. Vehicle manufactures choose things like tire sizes to give the best all around results. Besides with the sorry state of the roads in most areas nothing will help.
The OEM 215/45R17 tire is too small. The 225/45R17 tire is perfect and will also correct speedometer error. The same can be said about the 205/50R17 too.
 

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Bigger tires have a better ride. P225/50/17

I might have the biggest tires here for a 17in wheel. Best upgrade for ride and performance.
But that is too big a tire size and will throw off your speedometer. Getting the right tire that has a nice ride can make all the difference. You can find 225/45R17 tire that can have a better ride then a 225/50R17. The ride provided by different tires can vary greatly.

And I think the 245/40 might be pushing it a bit on the stock wheel width.

Can't wait to wear out my Stones and get some 225s on there.
True, if you went with 245/40R17 tires an 8" wide wheel would be better. I listed it since the diameter is correct.
 

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Fuel economy did take a hit. Used to get around 38 highway. Now get 35 mpg highway. As far ride quality it's amazing and I do not get any rubbing at all. A bigger tire will give a better ride and it's a plus it's wider for better handling. Also big fan of Michelin Tires. Highly recommend!
 

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Fuel economy did take a hit. Used to get around 38 highway. Now get 35 mpg highway. As far ride quality it's amazing and I do not get any rubbing at all. A bigger tire will give a better ride and it's a plus it's wider for better handling. Also big fan of Michelin Tires. Highly recommend!
That 38 to 35 may not be "real" though.
Since you've effectively increased your final drive ratio, your engine is running at a lower RPM for a given speed, thus, potentially saving fuel.

I know separate dash-mount GPS units are pretty much a thing of the past, and it's a pain to set one up every time you drive, but I'd be willing to bet that if you did so and used the GPS as your odometer, you'd find that you haven't lost much.
Stock tires compared to those 225/50s, the circumference is about 5.3% more, meaning that your speedometer (and odometer) will read 5.3% lower.
For every 100 miles you drive, your odometer is only registering 94.7 miles.
5% of 38 is 2, so I would expect to see a mathematical drop to 36mpg without actually using any more fuel over a given distance. You're at 35, which is pretty close to that.

I'd be more concerned about loss of power for climbing hills and acceleration away from an onramp, and in this area you may use more fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Fuel economy did take a hit. Used to get around 38 highway. Now get 35 mpg highway. As far ride quality it's amazing and I do not get any rubbing at all. A bigger tire will give a better ride and it's a plus it's wider for better handling. Also big fan of Michelin Tires. Highly recommend!
That 38 to 35 may not be "real" though.
Since you've effectively increased your final drive ratio, your engine is running at a lower RPM for a given speed, thus, potentially saving fuel.

I know separate dash-mount GPS units are pretty much a thing of the past, and it's a pain to set one up every time you drive, but I'd be willing to bet that if you did so and used the GPS as your odometer, you'd find that you haven't lost much.
Stock tires compared to those 225/50s, the circumference is about 5.3% more, meaning that your speedometer (and odometer) will read 5.3% lower.
For every 100 miles you drive, your odometer is only registering 94.7 miles.
5% of 38 is 2, so I would expect to see a mathematical drop to 36mpg without actually using any more fuel over a given distance. You're at 35, which is pretty close to that.

I'd be more concerned about loss of power for climbing hills and acceleration away from an onramp, and in this area you may use more fuel.
Yes you are correct for the fuel economy. I didn't see it that way. As far as power, there is a little loss in power in terms of pick up power.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yes you are correct for the fuel economy. I didn't see it that way. As far as power, there is a little loss in power in terms of pick up power.
The low end power was my biggest concern.
Guess I'll stick with my plans to go with 225/45.
Good choice of tire size. You will notice the difference in the way the car will handle.
 

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I have 245/45/17 for my corolla 16 s plus very smooth more tall i don't feel too much the pothole or bad roads very enjoyable only alik more slow when i star but its ok
 
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