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What can be causing every battery put in my 2017 Camry to leak and cause car not to crank. Happens about every 2 weeks. I was thinking it had to be too much voltage getting to it or something
 

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I find that too may clueless will over-tighten the battery hold downs.

I don't understand why everybody thinks it needs to have a death grip.

Squeeze that battery into an hourglass shape and wonder why batteries crack, leak, or explode. It must be rocket science and sense isn't common.

If the battery is dying or the charge is diminishing, you are either not driving it enough to charge it, have an electrical gremlin, are using a cheap battery, need to clean terminals, need to test alternator, or use a trickle charger when parked.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I find that too may clueless will over-tighten the battery hold downs.

I don't understand why everybody thinks it needs to have a death grip.

Squeeze that battery into an hourglass shape and wonder why batteries crack, leak, or explode. It must be rocket science and sense isn't common.

If the battery is dying or the charge is diminishing, you are either not driving it enough to charge it, have an electrical gremlin, are using a cheap battery, need to clean terminals, need to test alternator, or use a trickle charger when parked.
It will crank for about 2 weeks. I drive 130 miles a day to work and back. Then all of a sudden you have to jump it off and the mechanic says he cleaned battery acid off and that there are no problems with the car. I told him there is a short with the lights but he says diagnostics checks are good
 

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It will crank for about 2 weeks. I drive 130 miles a day to work and back. Then all of a sudden you have to jump it off and the mechanic says he cleaned battery acid off and that there are no problems with the car. I told him there is a short with the lights but he says diagnostics checks are good
It is quite common with modern batteries for them to have internal damage the plastic cell dividers where the integrity of each cell is compromised and that cell dies. There are 6 cells in a 12V lead acid car battery. The symptom can be intermittent and you can't tell just by looking at the battery.

There can also be damage to the external plastic case which causes similar problems. As mentioned, do not over-tighten the battery hold down.

But your problems could also be caused by an electrical short or something, not having to do with the battery.
 

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Time to get a new mechanic
 

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2017 Camry? How many miles?

In your original post, you stated "every battery" you've put in car has leaked or caused a long crank. How many batteries have you put in this car? Did you buy this vehicle new? is everything in the vehicle original to the vehicle, i.e. did you or anyone else add or replace equipment to the car?

Sounds like something is draining your battery when you park. As others have stated, try another mechanic.

Good luck.
 

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On my old car, it turned out to be the alternator putting out way too much voltage, pressurizing and destroying one battery after another.
Lucky me, it is why the previous owner let the car go for $40! I found a new alternator for it for under $100 and it was fine from that point on until I sold it many months later for pretty good money.

Definitely get a voltmeter on the battery with engine running on a fully-charged battery.
If the voltage is reading above the 14v-14.5v range, there you go, the voltage regulator (which was part of the alternator in my old car) needs replacement. The battery too may likely be toast already due to overcharging.

One thing I see a lot of with people diagnosing a troublesome car is their misunderstanding of how long it takes to get a battery up to full charge. They'll get the car jumped and then think that the battery is fully charged after they drive for a while. It actually takes many hours of driving for a battery to be back up to charge, even though there is enough surface charge on the battery to start the car. So a bit of time sitting unused, or time spent diagnosing the car with the door open or the key on, and that "charged" battery is back to not being able to start the car.
Also, the very high charge rate from driving the car to recharge a battery is very bad for the battery, heats it up and might make it lose fluid as gas bubbles form inside at too high of a rate. For this reason, and for the good of the car's charging system, a discharged battery should be recharged using a real car battery charger that will charge the battery at the correct rate over 12 hours or so.
From various abuses heaped on a battery, fluid loss from leakage or outgassing may leave it with low acid level and/or greatly reduced capacity. Such a battery will tend to out-gas and corrode the terminal wiring or leak outright.

So I think you should get this car's battery and charging voltage tested, before proceding further.
 
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