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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?

It would be great to put something in there that would draw less power and
put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night when I do deliveries.



--
- Mama Bear
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I think it was Mama Bear <[email protected]> who stated:

>I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
>replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?
>
>It would be great to put something in there that would draw less power and
>put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night when I do deliveries.


http://www.autolumination.com/festoon.htm has 'em.

*I* have no idea if they're any good, but someone from the Scion Life
list seemed to like 'em . . . .

-Don

--
He who laughs last thinks slowest
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 17:58:51 -0600, Reasoned Insanity wrote:

>
> "Mama Bear" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
>> replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?
>>
>> It would be great to put something in there that would draw less power
>> and put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night when I do
>> deliveries.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> - Mama Bear

>
> I've actually been wanting the same thing for my 95 Geo and so far no
> luck. Autozone didn't really have crap other than the regular replacement.



LEDs are generally a lower light level replacement. Look on-line.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Don Fearn <[email protected]> wrote :

> I think it was Mama Bear <[email protected]> who stated:
>
>>I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
>>replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?
>>
>>It would be great to put something in there that would draw less
>>power and put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night when I
>>do deliveries.

>
> http://www.autolumination.com/festoon.htm has 'em.
>
> *I* have no idea if they're any good, but someone from the Scion Life
> list seemed to like 'em . . . .


What's a "festoon" bulb?





--
- Mama Bear
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:13:49 GMT, Hachiroku ???? <[email protected]>
wrote:
>
>LEDs are generally a lower light level replacement. Look on-line.


They don't have to be lower light just because they're LED's.

My airplane has aftermarket wingtip and tail strobes that are actually
LEDs. Those suckers are BRIGHT!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:13:49 GMT, Hachiroku ???? <[email protected]>
wrote:
>On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 17:58:51 -0600, Reasoned Insanity wrote:
>> "Mama Bear" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]


>>>I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
>>> replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?
>>>
>>> It would be great to put something in there that would draw less power
>>> and put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night when I do
>>> deliveries.

>>
>> I've actually been wanting the same thing for my 95 Geo and so far no
>> luck. Autozone didn't really have crap other than the regular replacement.

>
>LEDs are generally a lower light level replacement. Look on-line.


You'll have to make an LED array and put it in the housing yourself.
But you can get some serious light output for only a few bucks each.

Light output is no longer a problem - They have 1-watt and 3-watt
Phillips Luxeon LED's have the "Stars" version that are mounted to a
PCB and hexagonal copper substrate chip, and need to be fastened to a
larger heat-sink to cool them - All the light you could want from only
one or two emitters.

www.lumileds.com

You'd have to trim the back out of the factory dome light and make
little brackets to hold a small CPU-size heatsink at the desired
angle.

--<< Bruce >>--
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bonehenge <[email protected]> wrote :

> On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:13:49 GMT, Hachiroku ???? <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>>
>>LEDs are generally a lower light level replacement. Look on-line.

>
> They don't have to be lower light just because they're LED's.
>
> My airplane has aftermarket wingtip and tail strobes that are actually
> LEDs. Those suckers are BRIGHT!
>
>
>


http://www.ultraleds.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=50&products_id=1334

"The LXK2-PW14-U00 White Luxeon K2 is part of the next generation of
LEDs that raises the industry standard for light output, thermal
management, cost and manufacturability. The K2 Power LED offer the
world’s best LED light output with 130 lumens of pure White light,
outstripping the performance of other power LEDs by 15 to 30% and
significantly lowering the cost per lumen."


I saw another article saying that incandescents produce about 15-20
lumens per watt.





--
- Mama Bear
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
http://www.treehugger.com/files/2005/11/white_led_break.php

White LED Breakthrough: Efficiency Doubles
by Michael Graham Richard, Gatineau, Canada on 11.20.05
Science & Technology (electronics)

white-led-breakthrough-01.jpg

It seems like the light emitting diode (LED) world is going from one
breakthrough to the next. The last one was the accidental invention of
warm white LEDs using quantum dots, and now a Japanese researcher at the
Meijo University, professor Satoshi Kamiyama, has found a way to make
white LEDs more efficient using a purple LED and a silicon carbide
substrate. This new white LED has a brightness of 130 lumens per watt!
"Normal incandescent light bulbs produce 15-20 lumens per watt; modern
fluorescent bulbs produce between 60-110 lumens per watt; and current
LED methods allow for a maximum of 60-70 lumens per watt. In short, if
this is real, it's a big breakthrough." Professor Satoshi Kamiyama will
establish a startup in January to manufacture and sell the LED units. He
already has 40 million yen, but it is expected that other companies will
want a stake in this. Thanks to reader Chris for the tip. ::White LED
doubles efficiency, ::White LED Efficiency Breakthrough?, ::Brighter LED
Break-Through




--
- Mama Bear
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bruce L. Bergman <[email protected]> wrote :

> On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:13:49 GMT, Hachiroku ???? <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>>On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 17:58:51 -0600, Reasoned Insanity wrote:
>>> "Mama Bear" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>> news:[email protected]

>
>>>>I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
>>>> replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?
>>>>
>>>> It would be great to put something in there that would draw less
>>>> power and put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night
>>>> when I do deliveries.
>>>
>>> I've actually been wanting the same thing for my 95 Geo and so far
>>> no luck. Autozone didn't really have crap other than the regular
>>> replacement.

>>
>>LEDs are generally a lower light level replacement. Look on-line.

>
> You'll have to make an LED array and put it in the housing
> yourself.


Nahhh. The ones on that one page already have 4 LED's in a bulb
equivalent. My question is, how many watts they draw and how many lumens
they put out, which they apparently don't want to tell at that site.

If they put four of the newer 1 watt white LED's in series with a
regulator, they could probably get some nice light output.

I think LED's drop about 1.2 volts, so maybe they could put 10 of the 1
watt ones in series for a dome light and REALLY have some nice output.
Might be pricy though.






--
- Mama Bear
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:39:50 +0000, Bonehenge wrote:

> On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:13:49 GMT, Hachiroku ???? <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>LEDs are generally a lower light level replacement. Look on-line.

>
> They don't have to be lower light just because they're LED's.
>
> My airplane has aftermarket wingtip and tail strobes that are actually
> LEDs. Those suckers are BRIGHT!



Are they arrays? And are you running a 12 or 24V system?
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 19:33:05 -0600, Mama Bear wrote:

> Bonehenge <[email protected]> wrote :
>
>> On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:13:49 GMT, Hachiroku ???? <[email protected]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>>LEDs are generally a lower light level replacement. Look on-line.

>>
>> They don't have to be lower light just because they're LED's.
>>
>> My airplane has aftermarket wingtip and tail strobes that are actually
>> LEDs. Those suckers are BRIGHT!
>>
>>
>>
>>

> http://www.ultraleds.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=50&products_id=1334
>
> "The LXK2-PW14-U00 White Luxeon K2 is part of the next generation of LEDs
> that raises the industry standard for light output, thermal management,
> cost and manufacturability. The K2 Power LED offer the world’s best LED
> light output with 130 lumens of pure White light, outstripping the
> performance of other power LEDs by 15 to 30% and significantly lowering
> the cost per lumen."
>
>
> I saw another article saying that incandescents produce about 15-20 lumens
> per watt.



Damn!
Thanks for the enlightenment! (No pun intended, but it got through anyway!)
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
In article <[email protected]>
[email protected] "Mama Bear" writes:

> I think LED's drop about 1.2 volts, [...]


It varies with colour and precise technology. Frex, the tiny red
ones I used around 1976 dropped 2.7v or so, IIRC. I am not up to
date on LEDs but expect similar problems still arise when driving
the things. Light output tended to be set by current (as well as
by precise efficiency and optical characteristics). And the way
volts developed across each LED varied with current made driving
them awkward. Simplest is to string a few LEDs in series but one
needs some kind of device to limit the current. This can be just
a resistor or something more complex like a transistor plus diode
plus two resistors in a "current source". Or something intricate
could be dreamed up; pass there but there is heat to lose, both
from the LEDs and from the current limiter. The big bind was the
variation in characteristics from device to device, though.

Hmm, I really should go mug up on modern LEDs.
--
Andrew Stephenson
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
"Mama Bear" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
> replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?
>
> It would be great to put something in there that would draw less power and
> put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night when I do deliveries.
>
>
>
> --
> - Mama Bear


Try a google search "3175 led bulb" to see the possibilities.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 02:11:54 +0000, Andrew Stephenson wrote:

> In article <[email protected]>
> [email protected] "Mama Bear" writes:
>
>> I think LED's drop about 1.2 volts, [...]

>
> It varies with colour and precise technology. Frex, the tiny red ones I
> used around 1976 dropped 2.7v or so, IIRC. I am not up to date on LEDs
> but expect similar problems still arise when driving the things. Light
> output tended to be set by current (as well as by precise efficiency and
> optical characteristics). And the way volts developed across each LED
> varied with current made driving them awkward. Simplest is to string a
> few LEDs in series but one needs some kind of device to limit the current.
> This can be just a resistor or something more complex like a transistor
> plus diode plus two resistors in a "current source". Or something
> intricate could be dreamed up; pass there but there is heat to lose, both
> from the LEDs and from the current limiter. The big bind was the
> variation in characteristics from device to device, though.
>
> Hmm, I really should go mug up on modern LEDs.



I remember back in '83 we were making a proprietary Power Supply for
Nashua Corp, IIRC, and it had to have these square LEDS as status
indicators. The ones we used glowed green if the unit was operating
properly and yellow/orange-ish if there was a problem. It was about the
ONLY circuit we DIDN'T have trouble with, so I never really learned how it
worked...
 
G

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think it was Mama Bear <[email protected]> who stated:

>Don Fearn <[email protected]> wrote :
>
>> I think it was Mama Bear <[email protected]> who stated:
>>
>>>I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
>>>replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?
>>>
>>>It would be great to put something in there that would draw less
>>>power and put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night when I
>>>do deliveries.

>>
>> http://www.autolumination.com/festoon.htm has 'em.
>>
>> *I* have no idea if they're any good, but someone from the Scion Life
>> list seemed to like 'em . . . .

>
>What's a "festoon" bulb?


From Google (define: festoon)

festoon -- A carved or painted ornament in the form of a garland of
fruit and flowers tied with ribbons and suspended at both ends in a
swag or loop.

I guess it's a bulb shaped like a festoon.

Well, sort of:

http://autolumination.com/images/auto_bulbs/31mm_hf_w_wm.jpg

-Don (Google is my friend)

--
He who laughs last thinks slowest
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 18:21:51 -0600, Mama Bear <[email protected]>
wrote:
>Don Fearn <[email protected]> wrote :
>> I think it was Mama Bear <[email protected]> who stated:


>>>I have a 93 Corolla wagon and am wondering if anyone sells an LED
>>>replacement for the overhead dome light bulb inside?
>>>
>>>It would be great to put something in there that would draw less
>>>power and put out a lot more light so I can read maps at night when I
>>>do deliveries.

>>
>> http://www.autolumination.com/festoon.htm has 'em.
>> *I* have no idea if they're any good, but someone from the Scion Life
>> list seemed to like 'em . . . .


That looks a lot easier than assembling them yourself, though a
wattage/lumen rating for the various models would be nice.

>What's a "festoon" bulb?


That's a UK-ian term for the end-terminal bulbs that look like an
old-style glass fuse. The original US version was the #211 lamp.

Originally designed to make building car dome light fixtures as
cheap as possible - just takes a couple of pieces of stamped steel to
hold the lamp, and a few rivets to hold them to the plastic housing.
No springs, no soldered wires, no complex bakelite or ceramic socket
components...

The term comes from festoon outdoor lighting - when you take a
string of christmas lights and string them between poles, trees or
buildings. Once upon a time, before the invention of standardized
lamp sockets and bases, you soldered light bulbs with bare leads into
the circuit by hand between two bare spots on the wires...

(Yeah, it wasn't too safe.)

Look at the temporary lighting at any christmas tree lot, or the
pre-made 100' long molded strings used on construction sites, that's a
higher wattage version.

--<< Bruce >>--
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 01:48:56 GMT, Hachiroku ???? <[email protected]>
wrote:

>On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:39:50 +0000, Bonehenge wrote:
>
>> On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 00:13:49 GMT, Hachiroku ???? <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>LEDs are generally a lower light level replacement. Look on-line.

>>
>> They don't have to be lower light just because they're LED's.
>>
>> My airplane has aftermarket wingtip and tail strobes that are actually
>> LEDs. Those suckers are BRIGHT!

>
>
>Are they arrays? And are you running a 12 or 24V system?


In the aircraft world, they call it 14 or 28 volt, even though it's
really what you say. <G>

We have 14v Whelen systems, each has some sort of LED array, not a
single LED.

The tail strobe replaced a 1970's "bubble gum machine" rotary beacon,
the wingtips were Xenon bulbs. Nowadays, most aftermarket navigation
and position lights are also LED, due to the low power draw,
brightness, and high reliability.

The down side? The tail strobe was almost $600. 8^( You can
probably buy the same part for a tow truck for $75, but it dosen't say
FAA Approved on the box.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I forgot to mention that all of my onboard "AA" battery flashlights
(red, green, blue, and white) are also LED.

They get so much better battery life than mini Maglites, that I
frequently don't bother to turn them off during a flight. I've
changed lots of Mag bulbs, but never had an LED flashlight fail.

Different colors work better for different charts, hence the
selection. The white one is only used for preflight inspection, as
it's much too bright for cockpit use.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
In article <[email protected]>
[email protected]
"=?iso-2022-jp?q?Hachiroku_=1B$B%O%A%m%=2F=1B=28B?=" writes:

> I remember back in '83 we were making a proprietary Power Supply for
> Nashua Corp, IIRC, and it had to have these square LEDS as status
> indicators. The ones we used glowed green if the unit was operating
> properly and yellow/orange-ish if there was a problem. It was about the
> ONLY circuit we DIDN'T have trouble with, so I never really learned how it
> worked...


Yes, if a LED is being used simply as an indicator (low power, no
precise light output specified) then the circuit is trivial. You
can usually get away with LED, series resistor (appropriate size)
and something to switch the current on/off (eg, transistor or one
of those ICs containing a set of open-collector transistors meant
for this kind of job).
--
Andrew Stephenson
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think it was Bruce L. Bergman <[email protected]>
who stated:

>On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 18:21:51 -0600, Mama Bear <[email protected]>
>wrote:


>>What's a "festoon" bulb?

>
> That's a UK-ian term for the end-terminal bulbs that look like an
>old-style glass fuse. The original US version was the #211 lamp.
>
> Originally designed to make building car dome light fixtures as
>cheap as possible - just takes a couple of pieces of stamped steel to
>hold the lamp, and a few rivets to hold them to the plastic housing.
>No springs, no soldered wires, no complex bakelite or ceramic socket
>components...
>
> The term comes from festoon outdoor lighting - when you take a
>string of christmas lights and string them between poles, trees or
>buildings. Once upon a time, before the invention of standardized
>lamp sockets and bases, you soldered light bulbs with bare leads into
>the circuit by hand between two bare spots on the wires...
>
> (Yeah, it wasn't too safe.)
>
> Look at the temporary lighting at any christmas tree lot, or the
>pre-made 100' long molded strings used on construction sites, that's a
>higher wattage version.
>
> --<< Bruce >>--


Thanx Bruce; your explanation was a LOT better than my lame attempt to
figure it out using Google. Now I have to use the term in a sentence
somewhere so I'll remember it . . . .

-Don

--
He who laughs last thinks slowest
 
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