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Another question, Does everyone delete distributor and use cop ignition with 7afe or 4afe engine?
must change ecu and use standalone ecu or another car ecu.
also provide crank trigger wheel for tdc.

if
 

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1994 Corolla DX
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Discussion Starter #42
Another question, Does everyone delete distributor and use cop ignition with 7afe or 4afe engine?
must change ecu and use standalone ecu or another car ecu.
also provide crank trigger wheel for tdc.
Are you trying to ask if anyone has converted their setup from distributor to coil packs? Given what would be involved that doesn't seem like a good use of time and money.
 

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Are you trying to ask if anyone has converted their setup from distributor to coil packs? Given what would be involved that doesn't seem like a good use of time and money.
Hi, I apologize for the bad English, yes i mean what you say
I know somebody change from carbi to injection
They delete distributor and use another car ecu ( kia motors)
they add crank position sensor and trigger wheel
and They relieved themselves of distributor troubles forever
 

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1994 Corolla DX
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Discussion Starter #44
Hi, I apologize for the bad English, yes i mean what you say
I know somebody change from carbi to injection
They delete distributor and use another car ecu ( kia motors)
they add crank position sensor and trigger wheel
and They relieved themselves of distributor troubles forever
In the case of our cars, already fuel injected, I think that's a solution in search of a problem. For a full carb-to-fuel injected conversion, sure, you're already fundamentally changing all these things.

Let's not lose sight of the fact that the distributors on these cars are 25 years old, typically with more than 100k miles on them. I created this thread not because the distributor setup on these cars is inherently bad or low quality, but because it's one of the issues that will emerge as the car ages and gets higher mileage. Some new OEM parts, and you're good to go for another 20 years. That's a rather acceptable solution to me.
 

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The issue is heat and electronic components, but it doesn't end there. The outlawing of PCBs used in coils and capacitors is also an issue. I worked on the early Datsun Z cars, first month of production was my 19th birthday month.

I still have a set of OE Datsun points for a 1970 240Z, now 49 years old. We kept them in stock because the aftermarket was total crap, 50 years ago.

The fist fuel injected Z cars were 1975 models, a very primitive system actually licensed from Bosch. They used a magnetic pickup in the distributor with a module that was not near the heat sources and they held up very well.

When the 280 ZXs came out in 1979 they had modules on the side of the distributor. At 100k miles they practically all failed from heat exposure. The issue was the exhaust manifold was on the same side as the intake. The modules just could not take the heat from the exhaust. Nissan had to add an auxiliary cooling fan to blow air on the injectors to keep the engines from vapor locking the injectors, boiling the fuel inside the lines. A hot restart was a constant complaint from customers, that was never really corrected in the 79-83 models, aggravated by the engine compartments getting cluttered with additional components. I sold so many of those modules I still remember the part number 22080P7901 and 22080 P8101 for the later high compression engines.

The trend I see is trying to cheap out on the parts. We did not sell aftermarket parts, our reputation and warranty was 1 year regardless of mileage and we almost never had to warranty anything. One customer replaced more starters on his single car, in a week, than we did in 15 years using only Nissan rebuilt units. The Advance Auto Parts replacements were for a 4 cylinder car. The originals were gear reduction starters, which were popular in drag racing due to their weight and power. Same customer came back, told me after 4 starters in a week he just wanted his car fixed and it was fixed when it left the shop.

See the pattern here. I once told a good customer "if you bought a new car and went to #$%^&* auto parts and replaced everything they offered for your car, it wouldn't run a week without a failure of a critical part". I sold my shop in 1999 and it just got worse after that. It's especially bad with the labor required to install some parts these days and we had a tech who could drop the transmission in a 300 twin turbo so fast when I got it to the machine shop to have the flywheel turned, they told me it was too hot to resurface.

I understand this post may not be relevant to this thread. Let me put it this way. I have a parts cars worth of used parts in my garage to replace stuff on my Echo, in some cases parts you can't get from Toyota any more, critical parts.

I WOULD RATHER USE USED PARTS THAT NEW AFTERMARKET CRAP.

Mods, if you feel this post should not be here, I understand if it is deleted. Aftermarket crap is nothing new, sure save a buck on things that don't leave you stranded on the side of the road.
 

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Do these things leak oil internally? I replaced the O-ring because there was oil all over the driver's side of the engine/transmission. I thought the leak was fixed but there is still oil collecting inside the cap and it drips out of the lowest elevation spark plug wire coming out of the cap. It's a bummer having to do it again because I don't have a timing light.
 

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1994 Corolla DX
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Discussion Starter #47
Do these things leak oil internally? I replaced the O-ring because there was oil all over the driver's side of the engine/transmission. I thought the leak was fixed but there is still oil collecting inside the cap and it drips out of the lowest elevation spark plug wire coming out of the cap. It's a bummer having to do it again because I don't have a timing light.
Yes, they can leak internally. The o-ring you replaced takes care of any leaks between the engine block and the distributor. But the distributor shaft itself obviously need to rotate, and as such there is a set of internal seals that can fail over time. DannoXYZ posted somewhere about how one would go about picking the distributor apart to fix those leaks... I recall it being rather involved. I'd personally replace the distributor instead.
 

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Usually by the time the seals leak, you might as well get a rebuilt, especially with an igniter included, keep old one for a spare and give them back a known bad one. OE is best but not cheap, in some cases more for the OE igniter than a whole rebuilt dist, so make sure you get a warranty.

Love the coil overs on my Echo.
 
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