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Stay away from Rav4 hybrid (crazy long wait times in Canada). I put deposit down within the first week of sales in april 2019. Sleezy sales team at Toyotaonthepark had me waiting until sept 2019 (5months). They contacted me back finally and tried to renegotiate the sales agreement (asking for more money realizing the high demand). This made me suspect they were selling to highest bidder irrespective of who signed their deal first.

I cancelled my rav4 hybrid order. Had my worse car purchasing experience ever at this dealership. When I complained about my experience to Toyota they said it was out of their control.
 

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Yes. Signed sales agreement with $1000 deposit. They actually called me in august to say my car would be ready. Then a few days later said there was a mix up and attempted to renegotiate the terms of the sale.

When I called Toyota canada to complain about extortion they said they cannot control what happens at dealership level.
 

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Yes. Signed sales agreement with $1000 deposit. They actually called me in august to say my car would be ready. Then a few days later said there was a mix up and attempted to renegotiate the terms of the sale.

When I called Toyota canada to complain about extortion they said they cannot control what happens at dealership level.
I don't know how Canada works, but in the USA the dealers are required by law to be independent from the manufacturer/distributor (with some minor exceptions). So any sales contract dispute you have is with the dealer. If you have a warranty dispute, you can contact Toyota since they offer the warranty (and pay the dealer to make repairs).

In the USA, if one has a sales contract, one can sue for specific performance or damages. But one would have to provide reasonable proof that they actually had the car and would not sell it at the agreed upon price. Lawsuits can be expensive, but we can go to Small Claims Court for very small filing fees (judgements are limited to $2,500 - $15,000 depending on the state).

The other option in the US is contacting a consumer affairs reporter at a local TV station, as they are always looking for stories to put on the air (and they usually get results).
 

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Thanks for the tips. I thought about many of those options, but they all just seemed to involve a lot of time and I needed a car by October. Ended up cancelling the order, getting my $1000 deposit refunded, and buying from a competitor car maker that delivered vehicle within 2 days of purchase.

Looking at google reviews indicate that other buyers have had similair experiences with this dealership.

Sad that this particular dealership can get away with this behaviour without any repercussions and tarnish the Toyota brand. I’ve purchased from Lexus in the past without any issues, so I feel like the problems are specifically with this dealer
 

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I don't know how Canada works, but in the USA the dealers are required by law to be independent from the manufacturer/distributor (with some minor exceptions). So any sales contract dispute you have is with the dealer. If you have a warranty dispute, you can contact Toyota since they offer the warranty (and pay the dealer to make repairs).

In the USA, if one has a sales contract, one can sue for specific performance or damages. But one would have to provide reasonable proof that they actually had the car and would not sell it at the agreed upon price. Lawsuits can be expensive, but we can go to Small Claims Court for very small filing fees (judgements are limited to $2,500 - $15,000 depending on the state).

The other option in the US is contacting a consumer affairs reporter at a local TV station, as they are always looking for stories to put on the air (and they usually get results).
Most powerful, effective thing you can do IMO for anything consumer related is to contact your state's attorney general's office, which most often have a consumer affairs division. Most businesses will crumble at just the threat of contacting a state's AG, and I assume Canadians have something similar. It's worked miracles for me a couple times, including an Acura dealership twenty years ago that tried to screw me over and ended up refunding me almost $500 to make me go away. :)
 
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