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Discussion Starter #1
so i can hear my timing chain its pretty loud its all slappy like, i dont have any money to do anything about it so any of you think it will be good until its warmer and i have muneys to actually get it fixed along with a complete tune up of my truck
 

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Discussion Starter #2
lol and dont pick on my im only 16 and i work at friendlys i can barely pay for gas but my vo tech instructor is finding me a good diesel job
 

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One with the farce
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I hate to tell you, but if you don't change it very very very soon, you will have to pull apart the whole engine. The reason is that the timing chain will slap its way through the timing cover into the coolant passage. Then all your coolant will go into your oilpan and that sludge will get pumped through everything. Also, because you have no coolant, the headgasket will blow, crack the head.....You get the idea I hope.
 

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It gets better.. If you know its the timing chain and that bad boy breaks on yea.. not only wil the odds are you will need a new timing cover.. and the whole coolant in the oil thing.. but its possible a value could hit a pistion.. or a pistion a value same difference then you need new pistions too... so i would either stop driving it if possible or get it worked on asap.. things will get much worse for you if you dont..


and if you get it replaced i would conisder doing a metal dampers :)... damn plastic things break.. and problems happen...
 

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Replace it now. It's not going to get any cheaper or easier.

If you are really squeezed for cash, you might get away with just replacing the plastic guides with new ones but that requires almost as much labor as replacing the whole chain so it's really not worth it.
 

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YOTA Master
'93 2wd P/U
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if the timing chain fails, it is not just possible, but likely that engine damage will occur.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hmm well im not sure if its normal with a healthy 22re it sounds as if you were riding a mountain bike in maybe 2nd or 1st gear but alot less loud, you can hear it when accelerating in higher gears under a load like if your in 4th gear and you give it a little gas
 

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YOTA Master
'93 2wd P/U
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timing chains rattle at idle mostly. Noises like you are describing more often are drivetrain related

If you are concerned about the timing chain it is not hard to inspect it. Just remove the valve cover for a look-see. what you are looking for is a broken chain guide. They are made from nylon and are notorious for breaking.

When this happens you will notice a lot more rattling noise on start-up and at idle especially when the engine is at operating temperature. pieces from the broken guide can fall into the chain and cause it to jump time. also with no guide the chain is flopping around a bunch and is more likely to break.

You hear a lot about these chains failing, and it does happen, but it is not really that frequent. I'm driving a '93 with 213k and the guide is still intact (well at least it was last week when I looked).

So anyhow if you are unable to identify the noise you are hearing I would suggest finding someone who can listen to it and get you going in the correct (never go right) direction.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
oh i see, yeah i dont really hear anything when idling except for the fan freewheeling and the normal 22r sounds, like tick tick tick tick
 

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oh-pin-yun-A-ted
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when my guide broke on my pickup, it rattled on start up and idle and cruising in 4th adn 5th gears. couldnt hear it much other than that.
 

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When I bought my truck, it had a timing chain problem and I didnt know it. I eventually wanted to know what the noise I was hearing was. It was my timing chain. And I had driven on it for months without anything happening. LUCKY ME!

The timing chain tensioner was broken off and it had fallen down into the oil pan. The plastic guides, were broken as well. IT was just my timing chain and the gears and lucky for me, it all worked until I had the chance to figure out what it was and fix the problem. But BECAREFUL putting your timing chain cover back on, because I messed up my head gasket and had to put a new head gasket on it after I had put it all back together, I had to take it back apart. FUN FUN. Never again would I want to do that. I'm inexperienced.
 

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I would still inspect the guides as vicoor mentioned just to be safe. Otherewise, it sounds like it could possibly be the infamous valve noise.
 

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If you cannot afford to change your timing chain then find a local community college (vocational school) as they will change it for free in their car mechanics course.Or find a friend,relative,neighbour or co-worker who has heated shed or garage and has experience doing these.
Finally find a local off-road club near you as many members drive Toyotas and have lots of experience so are able to repair your problem for a couple hundred bucks.

Most engine wear on any engine occurs at startup with that said the R series Toyota engines such as the 18R,20R and 22R all use a timing chain which it's tension is supplied by hydraulically driven timing chain tensioner which has it's oil pressure build up few seconds after the engine has started therefore the timing chain rubs on the driver's side brown colored nylon/plastic timing chain dampener or guide and after so many miles (140-170 000 miles in the city with the average 4 starts per day) the driver's side guide breaks through causing the chain to rub on the timing chain cover for the first few seconds upon startup and when driving in 5th gear and letting off the gas.

Usually by this point the other timing components such as the camshaft sprocket,crankshaft sprocket and chain have their specs out of tolerance and hence must be replaced as well.The tensioner sometimes sticks due to dirt build up and other problems arise as well and must be replaced as well,all of those parts are sold in the aftermarket world as a "timing chain kit" which also include gaskets and a front oil crankshaft seal.Toyota on the other hand for some reason does not sell the parts as a kit but as individual parts which would cost around $400+ and from all of the reading I have done on many Toyota 4-Runner/pickup discussion sites I have come to the conclusion that many experienced off-roaders who cannot afford to buy all of the genuine Toyota timing parts instead buy the chain and tensioner from Toyota and the other parts from aftermarket as a kit but of course don't use the aftermarket chain or tensioner.

The best brand of aftermarket timing chain parts to use on the 20R & 22R series Toyota motors are:

http://www.engnbldr.com/ToyotaHotlicks.htm
http://www.22r.biz
http://www.rpmrons.com/toyotatiming.html
http://www.toyota-engine-parts.com
http://www.europeanautomotive.com

and if you choose to buy from Toyota these places have the best prices in the USA & probably the whole world:

http://www.1sttoyotaparts.com/partscat.html (10% shipping by Fed Ex or free shipping with $100 & over speak to Roger at 1-888-271-3948)
http://www.toyotadiscountparts.com (free shipping with $100 & up)
http://www.Toyotaparts4U.com
http://www.toyotaofplano.com

Other ways to check timing chain wear are:

http://www.misterfixit.com/chanslop.htm

you can also remove the valve cover and take a flashlight and see if the driver's side timing chain dampener or guide wore through.

You can bend 1 to all 8 valves and have timing cover eaten through if you wait and then coolant and oil mix together to give you butterflies in your stomach.You can do a fluid analysis on your engine oil by going to any Caterpillar and buying a fluid analysis kit for around $15-20 and taking a sample of your old oil.

Finally these sites explain the timing chain replacement well:

http://yotarepair.com/22R timingchain.html
http://www.4crawler.com/4x4/CheapTricks/EngineMods/TimingChain.shtml
http://www.4x4wire.com/toyota/maintenance/timingchain
http://www.4x4wire.com/toyota/reviews/doatimingchain

Make sure you use 50% Toyota long life red low silicates radiator coolant to reduce corrosion build up on the tiny water bypass passages found in the aluminum cylinder head and preferably 50% distilled water,rain water or snow water.

I would pour the mixed coolant & water combination into the thermostat hole until full then install new stat and stat cover/hose tighten up.Start the truck on an incline or car ramps and start pouring mixed coolant & water combo into radiatior almost to the neck wait for stat to open which is about 10 minutes of idling then turn your heater on to high and hot (as well as your back seat heater controls for those with 4-Runners) and rev the engine back and forth but not too high.Re-top the coolant and continue to do so for one or more stat cycles.

Finally turn the heater control from hot to cold repeatedly and from high to low and place about half mixed coolant & water into overflow bottle and place stat cap back on,take for a test drive.Once engine has cooled off check the rad level and overflow bottle.

Sidney®
Repairs tv's,vcr's,home/car audio out of my home
E-mail:[email protected]
Dartmouth,Nova Scotia
Canada
1985 Toyota 4-Runner,solid front straight axle,factory cruise control,sunroof,22R-E,W56,RN60LV-MSEK,with 253 000 KM

:kingme: for I am :canada:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
wow thanks for all that advice but i asked my dad about it and he talked to the previous owner who had the timing chain stuffs replaced, and also a mechanic checked over it and he said "this truck is virtually indestructable"lol and my dad was there
 

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YOTA Master
'93 2wd P/U
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Tip from Vicoor....

This is top secret, so before you read you must swear on a Toyota Factory Service Manual (.pdf will do in a pinch) that you will not reveal this to anyone.

If you choose to replace your timing chain without removing the cylinder head, Take the oil pump off of the timing cover and remove the oil pump drive collar from the crankshaft. This will allow for more maneuverablility of the timing cover and save damge to the head gasket.
 
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